Home | Webstore
Latest News: OOTP Update 20.5 - OOTP 20 Available - FHM 5 Available

Collection Missions for Perfect Team Released!

  

Go Back   OOTP Developments Forums > Out of the Park Baseball 20 > OOTP 20 - General Discussions

OOTP 20 - General Discussions Everything about the newest version of Out of the Park Baseball - officially licensed by MLB.com and the MLBPA.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-23-2019, 12:05 AM   #1
Swimmer
Minors (Double A)
 
Swimmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Castle Rock, Colorado
Posts: 158
Thanks: 1
Thanked 26x in 6 posts
Anomalous Relief Statistics

Here's something I haven't seen before. I'm running a league using 1937 PCMs and league totals. I've got league totals locked and autocalc set on. I've run about 45 years of time.

Poking around through my results, I've uncovered some truly weird stats that a number of relief pitchers have accumulated. Pretty much like nothing I've ever seen before, and I go back to OOTP 2.

I have a cohort of relievers that have posted huge numbers of appearances, but not a lot of innings, and nevertheless have posted huge numbers of both saves and wins. They have very unremarkable ERA, OppAVG, WHIP, and K/9 numbers.

For instance: look at this career line:
1825 G, 0 GS, 241 W, 164 L, 333 SV, 109 HLD, 3117 IP, ERA 3.80, oAvg .251, WHIP 1.42, K/9 4.9

Looking year to year, he has 14 consecutive years with both double digit wins and double digit saves, and with one exception during that run, over 100 appearances each year. No starts at all. Openers/followers are not enabled in this league. He has a year where he won 25 games, and saved 27, leading both of those statistics. In that year he had 104 appearances and only 179 innings pitched.

There are about 25 relievers in the game that have similar stats. Very high appearances, relatively low innings, large numbers of both wins and saves. Other stats good but unremarkable. If you sort career stats by appearances, there's a chunk of relievers who all have 1700 or more appearances and general stats like this, and then there's a gap all the way down to the high 1400s, and then there are more normal numbers after that.

The thing is, I can't even think of what mechanism would create this. Most of the players overlapped about a 25 year period starting about 8-10 years after the beginning of the league and finishing up about 10 years before now. I didn't notice it when it was happening, and it's not happening now.

Any thoughts from the gurus about what would create a bubble of players like this?
__________________
People ask me what I do in the winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring.
--Rogers Hornsby
Swimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 02:00 AM   #2
Findest2001
All Star Reserve
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Boston
Posts: 824
Thanks: 218
Thanked 155x in 124 posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swimmer View Post
Here's something I haven't seen before. I'm running a league using 1937 PCMs and league totals. I've got league totals locked and autocalc set on. I've run about 45 years of time.

Poking around through my results, I've uncovered some truly weird stats that a number of relief pitchers have accumulated. Pretty much like nothing I've ever seen before, and I go back to OOTP 2.

I have a cohort of relievers that have posted huge numbers of appearances, but not a lot of innings, and nevertheless have posted huge numbers of both saves and wins. They have very unremarkable ERA, OppAVG, WHIP, and K/9 numbers.

For instance: look at this career line:
1825 G, 0 GS, 241 W, 164 L, 333 SV, 109 HLD, 3117 IP, ERA 3.80, oAvg .251, WHIP 1.42, K/9 4.9

Looking year to year, he has 14 consecutive years with both double digit wins and double digit saves, and with one exception during that run, over 100 appearances each year. No starts at all. Openers/followers are not enabled in this league. He has a year where he won 25 games, and saved 27, leading both of those statistics. In that year he had 104 appearances and only 179 innings pitched.

There are about 25 relievers in the game that have similar stats. Very high appearances, relatively low innings, large numbers of both wins and saves. Other stats good but unremarkable. If you sort career stats by appearances, there's a chunk of relievers who all have 1700 or more appearances and general stats like this, and then there's a gap all the way down to the high 1400s, and then there are more normal numbers after that.

The thing is, I can't even think of what mechanism would create this. Most of the players overlapped about a 25 year period starting about 8-10 years after the beginning of the league and finishing up about 10 years before now. I didn't notice it when it was happening, and it's not happening now.

Any thoughts from the gurus about what would create a bubble of players like this?

Most likely they were stoppers. Stoppers are basically the Nolan Ryans of the RP world. They pitch anywhere from 1-5 innings. They play a lot. They are the 1950's-1990's closers, basically. Except they excel in getting wins during key, high-leverage situations. I have had several stoppers have 20+ saves, 15-20 wins, 100 appearances, 150+ innings in the same season.


That's my guess based on my experience, and my understanding of the stopper role, anyways.
__________________
Findest2001 is online now   Reply With Quote
Thank you for this post:
polydamas (05-23-2019)
Old 05-23-2019, 06:23 AM   #3
Reed
All Star Reserve
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 683
Thanks: 101
Thanked 261x in 184 posts
What are your setting for using relievers/closers? Very rarely, rarely, normal, etc.. what is their stamina setting? Very low, low, normal, etc..
Reed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 09:13 AM   #4
Mariner and Giants Fan
All Star Reserve
 
Mariner and Giants Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Kent, WA.
Posts: 905
Thanks: 246
Thanked 80x in 52 posts
These RP stats are not to dissimilar to Mike Marshall circa 1972-1975, so it is not unheard of.
__________________
Hebrews 11:1 "Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen"
Mariner and Giants Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 12:13 PM   #5
Swimmer
Minors (Double A)
 
Swimmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Castle Rock, Colorado
Posts: 158
Thanks: 1
Thanked 26x in 6 posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reed View Post
What are your setting for using relievers/closers? Very rarely, rarely, normal, etc.. what is their stamina setting? Very low, low, normal, etc..
Relievers - Rarely/Closers Very Rarely. Interestingly, both Hooks are set to Very Quick, which doesn't seem right for 1937. Pitcher stamina is High.
__________________
People ask me what I do in the winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring.
--Rogers Hornsby
Swimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 12:19 PM   #6
Swimmer
Minors (Double A)
 
Swimmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Castle Rock, Colorado
Posts: 158
Thanks: 1
Thanked 26x in 6 posts
OK. I restored a backup and loaded 1937 strategy settings to check. 1937 strategy is by default a -5 (very quick) hook for both starters and relievers. Use of relievers and closers is rarely and very rarely.

In fact, the very quick hook setting is throughout the dead ball era. I've loaded strategy from multiple years all the way back to 1871, and the hook is always very quick. That doesn't seem right to me.
__________________
People ask me what I do in the winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring.
--Rogers Hornsby

Last edited by Swimmer; 05-23-2019 at 05:48 PM. Reason: Originally said I created a new game, which is inaccurate. I'm getting old.
Swimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 12:38 PM   #7
Swimmer
Minors (Double A)
 
Swimmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Castle Rock, Colorado
Posts: 158
Thanks: 1
Thanked 26x in 6 posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariner and Giants Fan View Post
These RP stats are not to dissimilar to Mike Marshall circa 1972-1975, so it is not unheard of.
It does, especially his Cy Young year. But, Mike Marshall is a bit of an outlier. I have dozens of relievers building up stats like that.

Also, Marshall's 106 games played in 1974 is still the MLB record. No one else IRL is over 100 games played. In my universe, I have hundreds of relievers with over 100 games played in a season, with the record as 148. It takes 136 games played in my universe just to get you onto the leaderboard.

Career wise, the record in my universe for games is 2792 (!). The real life record is 1252.
__________________
People ask me what I do in the winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring.
--Rogers Hornsby

Last edited by Swimmer; 05-23-2019 at 12:39 PM.
Swimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 02:16 PM   #8
Findest2001
All Star Reserve
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Boston
Posts: 824
Thanks: 218
Thanked 155x in 124 posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swimmer View Post
It does, especially his Cy Young year. But, Mike Marshall is a bit of an outlier. I have dozens of relievers building up stats like that.

Also, Marshall's 106 games played in 1974 is still the MLB record. No one else IRL is over 100 games played. In my universe, I have hundreds of relievers with over 100 games played in a season, with the record as 148. It takes 136 games played in my universe just to get you onto the leaderboard.

Career wise, the record in my universe for games is 2792 (!). The real life record is 1252.

With that bolded part being key, your experience is definitely out of the ordinary. In the heyday of pitching I would expect 5-10 pitchers AT MOST having numbers like that (dead ball numbers), but not so many the leaderboard is filled. That's absurd.
__________________
Findest2001 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 02:39 PM   #9
Swimmer
Minors (Double A)
 
Swimmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Castle Rock, Colorado
Posts: 158
Thanks: 1
Thanked 26x in 6 posts
Update:

It was definitely the Hook settings. Combining a Very Quick Hook with use of relievers and closers set to Rarely and Very Rarely creates situations that the game obviously doesn't handle well. Thanks for making me look at that more closely, I hadn't noticed that.

I changed the Hook back to default and ran a couple of years ahead. Presto, back to normal.

Now the question is, how did the hook setting get to -5? I certainly never set it at that. I've started a test league in 1937, and the hook is set to default. In fact, I've tried a number of years from the deadball era to today, and the hook always starts at default, and changing the year within the game does not change it from default.

I have no idea how it got set to very quick, but I'll certainly be watching that in the future...
__________________
People ask me what I do in the winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring.
--Rogers Hornsby
Swimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 02:42 PM   #10
bertha
Bat Boy
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 11
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1x in 1 post
subscribed, this seems like a very interesting thread

Last edited by bertha; 05-23-2019 at 02:46 PM.
bertha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2019, 03:17 PM   #11
damientheomen3
Hall Of Famer
 
damientheomen3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: with my army of orangutans
Posts: 2,630
Thanks: 1,221
Thanked 603x in 373 posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swimmer View Post
Update:

It was definitely the Hook settings. Combining a Very Quick Hook with use of relievers and closers set to Rarely and Very Rarely creates situations that the game obviously doesn't handle well. Thanks for making me look at that more closely, I hadn't noticed that.

I changed the Hook back to default and ran a couple of years ahead. Presto, back to normal.

Now the question is, how did the hook setting get to -5? I certainly never set it at that. I've started a test league in 1937, and the hook is set to default. In fact, I've tried a number of years from the deadball era to today, and the hook always starts at default, and changing the year within the game does not change it from default.

I have no idea how it got set to very quick, but I'll certainly be watching that in the future...
I noticed the other day one of my OOTP 19 leagues switched itself up at some point from 0's in the hook settings to what I believe is the modern day setting, -3 for starters and -5 for relievers. Considering that was a feature that iirc was added in during an OOTP 19 patch, maybe there's a bug that's switching leagues to the modern day setting for the feature.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by axezzy View Post
spotted an 11-run lead, then going into the 9th up by 8 and not a single out recorded (using three relief pitchers all warmed up), nine runs score... game over? nope, thank the demo for saving me $20 on the after the season special or/and another $35-40 on 14. I will NOT be purchasing this piece of crap!
You see, this guy here, he is that guy. Don't be that guy.


Join the VHL today!
damientheomen3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:36 AM.

 

Major League Baseball trademarks and copyrights are used with permission of MLB Advanced Media, L.P. Minor League Baseball trademarks and copyrights are used with the permission of Minor League Baseball. All rights reserved.

The Major League Baseball Players Association (www.MLBPLAYERS.com ) is the collective bargaining representative for all professional baseball players of the thirty Major League Baseball teams and serves as the exclusive group licensing agent for commercial and licensing activities involving active Major League baseball players. On behalf of its members, it operates the Players Choice licensing program and the Players Choice Awards, which benefit the needy through the Major League Baseball Players Trust, a charitable foundation established and run entirely by Major League baseball players. Follow: @MLB_Players; @MLBPAClubhouse; @MLBPlayersTrust

Out of the Park Baseball is a registered trademark of Out of the Park Developments GmbH & Co. KG

Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.

Apple, iPhone, iPod touch and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

COPYRIGHT © 2017 OUT OF THE PARK DEVELOPMENTS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

 

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © 2018 Out of the Park Developments