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OOTP 19 - Historical Simulations Discuss historical simulations and their results in this forum.

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Old 06-15-2018, 01:02 PM   #41
JaBurns
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Early Wynn has either been boom or bust in my many misguided attempts, but he always seems to come into the draft in the early years. Which makes me think, I haven’t yet seen him in any of my 13 drafts in my current league.
Has anyone else noticed that certain players always show up early in random debut drafts?

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Old 06-17-2018, 12:40 AM   #42
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2014 Year in Review

Frontier League: After a disappointing first half, the Baltimore Robins clinched their third straight playoff spot, narrowly winning the Northeast Division in a one-game playoff over the Buffalo Fighting Elk. The Robins were led by star rookie catcher Willson Contreras, who hit .342 with 27 homers and 86 RBIs, and their versatile outfield of John Hummel, Rick Monday, and Leon Durham, who missed by one home run from having all three members join the 30-30 club. Durham led the way with 34 homers, 41 steals, and scored 113 runs. Buffalo appeared to have the division title comfortably in hand, but lost 7 of their final 11 games. They were led once again by catcher Dave Nilsson, who hit .331 and slugged .501, and pitcher Jair Jurrjens, who went 17-9 with a 2.58 ERA.

The London Werewolves seized control of the Great Lakes division in mid-April, and cruised to the division title with 95 wins, led by right fielder Trevor Plouffe, who hit .316 with 34 homers and 104 RBI's, and rookie righthander Cy Blanton, who went 21-8 with a 2.49 ERA. The Cleveland Rocks returned to the postseason with a well-balanced attack, led by right fielder Aaron Judge, who hit .318 with 41 homers and 111 RBI's, shortstop Jose Reyes, who hit .300 with 16 homers, 75 steals, and 112 runs scored, and perennial Cy Young award candidate Jack Chesbro, who went 19-9 with a sparkling 1.77 ERA, an 0.94 WHIP, and led all pitchers with 10.9 WAR.

The Kansas City Mad Hatters won a league-best 101 games, led by an elite pitching staff which surrendered just 506 runs on the season. Billy Pierce and Joe Hesketh won 20 games and topped 200 strikeouts apiece, and four members of their rotation (Pierce, Hesketh, Rube Foster, and Manny Parra) sported sub-2.50 ERA's. Second baseman George Grantham hit .341 with 78 steals and scored 107 runs, while left fielder Lonnie Smith hit .322 with 21 homers, 72 steals, and scored 101 runs. Yet, for much of the season, Kansas City trailed the Minneapolis Penguins, who finished with 95 wins thanks to a similarly deep pitching staff. But staff ace Madison Bumgarner, who had a hard-luck 11-9 record despite a stellar 2.47 ERA, would miss the first round, and potentially part of the second round of the playoffs with a shoulder injury. Andy Van Slyke had another strong all-around season, hitting .332 with 25 homers, 88 RBI's, and 62 steals for the Penguins.

Mickey Mantle led the 98-win Denver Spikes back into the postseason by winning the Frontier League triple crown, hitting .359 with 44 homers and 136 RBI's. Slugging first baseman Kent Hrbek ripped 36 homers and drove in 123 runs as well, while southpaw Rube Bressler went 18-8 with a strong 3.04 ERA despite the thin mountain air. The San Francisco Longshoremen made their maiden entry into the postseason, as a deep pitching staff led by 19-game winner Michael Wacha and a bullpen anchored by Brad Lidge, who saved 32 games with a 1.67 ERA.

Continental League: In a virtual repeat from last year, the hard-hitting Charlotte Aviators returned to the postseason, winning the Atlantic Division with 93 wins, thanks to strong seasons from right fielder Richard Hidalgo, who hit .349 with 38 homers and 131 RBI's, and catcher Bill Freehan, who hit .292 with 30 homers and 100 RBI's. Steve Hargan went 20-8 with a 2.15 ERA. The Washington Ambassadors seized the wild card once again with a balanced performance, led by third baseman Rafael Devers, who hit .320 with 24 homers and 107 RBI's, and crafty southpaw Ray Collins, who went 16-7 with a 2.15 ERA.

The Miami Flamingos won the Southeast Division with 93 wins, as rookie center fielder Bobby Thomson hit .340 with 32 homers and 127 RBI's, and the pitching staff featured three 18-game winners in Matt Clement, Jesse Tannehill, and Brian Bannister. After a slow start, the New Orleans Crawfish returned to the postseason, clinching the wild card on the last day of the season with a 22-run eruption against New York. Right fielder Pete Rose led the Crawfish with a .361 average, while defending Cy Young Award winner Gary Nolan won his last five starts to go 20-12 with a 2.74 ERA. The Atlanta Ducks benefited from a late-season collapse by the Phoenix Lizards to seize the final wild card spot, which they clinched with a tie-breaking homer by Larry Whisenton in the ninth inning of the season finale. The Ducks were led once again by Joey Votto, who hit .324 with 28 homers, 107 RBI's, and a league-best 146 walks, and Troy Tulowitzki, who ripped 21 homers, drove in 96 runs, and provided Gold Glove caliber defense at shortstop.

The San Antonio Marksmen won a tough Texas Division with 93 wins, led by rookie outfielder J.D. Drew, who hit .298 with 28 homers and 125 RBI's, and shortstop Donie Bush, who had a .421 on-base percentage and led baseball with 107 steals. Ted Blankenship anchored a deep pitching staff with a 21-7 record and 2.13 ERA. The defending champion El Paso Armadillos won 89 games, led once again by their league-best pitching staff. Free agent signee Jeff Fassero dazzled with a 14-6 record and 1.54 ERA despite missing eight weeks, while first baseman Frank Chance led a scrappy, slap-hitting offense by hitting .344 and scoring 113 runs.

The Los Angeles Kangaroos ran away with the Southwest Division with a 110-52 record, as first baseman Dick Allen hit .318 with 42 homers and 120 RBI's, and right fielder Gary Sheffield blasted 31 homers, stole 32 bases, and drove in 100 runs. Southpaw Brett Anderson had a strong sophomore campaign with a 19-10 record and a 2.68 ERA, and closer Dick Radatz had a league-high 39 saves and a 1.95 ERA. Perhaps the biggest disappointment was the Phoenix Lizards, who fell out of the postseason on the final day of the season after losing seven of their final eight games, on their way to a dreadful 9-16 September record.

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Old 06-20-2018, 01:12 AM   #43
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2014 Year in Review - Playoff Report

Frontier League - After a disappointing regular season, which culminated in blowing a sizable division lead to their rival Baltimore Robins, the Buffalo Fighting Elk sputtered into the postseason to face off against the Kansas City Mad Hatters, winners of a league-best 101 games and owners of the top pitching staff in the Frontier League. The matchup proved to be a mismatch -- only the Fighting Elk swept the Mad Hatters, holding Kansas City to nine runs in four games. Buffalo first baseman Jose Abreu won series MVP after hitting .389 with two homers. Buffalo won game 4 in dramatic fashion, as backup second baseman Alex Kampouris hit a walk-off homer in his lone at-bat of the series. Baltimore outlasted the Minneapolis Penguins in six games, as rookie sensation Willson Contreras hit .435 with two homers and 9 RBI's, and Clay Buchholz sported a 1.29 ERA. The San Francisco Longshoremen shut down the powerful London offense, holding the Werewolves to just 13 runs in 6 games and a lone homer. Catcher Earl Smith hit .429 and scored five runs, while rookie Ted Abernathy had a 1.64 ERA in two starts. The Denver Spikes dominated the Cleveland Rocks, shutting them out in the first three games, and outscoring Cleveland 26-1 for the series, while Mickey Mantle hit .688, and Kent Hrbek ripped three homers and drove in seven runs. In the Division Series, Baltimore outlasted the rival Fighting Elk in six games, as Rick Monday hit .450, and Leon Durham blasted three homers, including a tie-breaking moonshot in the seventh inning of the decisive Game Six. Denver came from behind, winning the last three games to eliminate the San Francisco Longshoremen in six games, as shortstop Donnie Hill hit .391 with two homers and eight RBI's, and southpaw Rube Bressler won both his starts and sported a stellar 1.17 ERA. In the League Championship Series, Baltimore held the powerful Denver offense in check, winning easily in five games, and surrendering just seven runs in their four victories. Leon Durham took home the hardware after hitting .318 with two homers -- including one in the thirteenth inning of Game One -- while Clay Buchholz continued his strong postseason by allowing just a single earned run in 14.2 innings, including a complete game 3-1 victory in the clinching Game Five.

Continental League - The heavily-favored Los Angeles Kangaroos, winners of 110 games, struggled to put away the 87-win Atlanta Ducks in six games. Second baseman Joe Panik hit .500 with a homer, 4 RBI's, and 7 walks, southpaw Brett Anderson pitched sixteen innings without allowing an earned run, and closer Dick Radatz struck out nine Ducks in six shutout innings while earning three saves. The upstart Miami Flamingos upended the seasoned Washington Ambassadors in six games, as rookie center fielder Bobby Thomson hit .522 with seven RBI's, and Tuffy Rhodes broke a tie with a series-ending walk-off homer off Mike Timlin in Game Six. In the most dramatic series of the wild card round, the defending champion El Paso Armadillos wiped out a 3-1 deficit to the Charlotte Aviators by sweeping the final three games, led by catcher Tommy Clarke, who hit .520 with a homer and 8 RBI's, and Sheriff Blake, who won both his starts with a 1.72 ERA. The San Antonio Marksmen won a tight six-game series over the upset-minded New Orleans Crawfish, breaking a tie with four runs in the top of the ninth of Game Five, and winning Game Six in ten innings. Right fielder Michael Tucker was named MVP after hitting .409 with two homers and 5 RBI's, while center fielder JD Drew hit .450 with a homer and 3 RBI's. In the Divisional Series, Los Angeles easily dispatched the Miami Flamingos in five games, despite dropping the opener. Kangaroos shortstop Simon Nicholls led all hitters with a .455 average and four runs scored, while Miami outfielders Brady Anderson and Bobby Thomson combined for five homers. In a Texas Division showdown, El Paso outlasted San Antonio in another seven-game classic, with Hank Wyse outdueling Ted Blankenship for a 1-0 win in Game Six, and the Armadillos held on for a 6-4 victory in Game Seven. Catcher Tommy Clarke took home another series MVP trophy after hitting .320 and scoring three runs. The Armadillos' luck ran out in the League Championship Series, as the Los Angeles Kangaroos eliminated them in six games. The Kangaroos surrendered just 11 runs in six games, as they won the first three games, and then after dropping two pitchers' duels, won a 14-2 laugher in the finale. Gary Sheffield led the way, hitting .400 with two homers and 9 RBI's, and Mike Krukow threw two complete-game victories with a 1.00 ERA.

World Series - Although the Los Angeles Kangaroos won 19 more games than the Baltimore Robins during the regular season, Baltimore entered the series on a roll, having dominated Denver's league-leading offense in the League Championship Series. Los Angeles, however, immediately laid down the law in Game One, as Ken Gables threw a no-hitter, dominating the Robins in a 4-0 victory. The Kangaroos won Game Two 7-5, behind homers from Adam Duvall and Larry Bigbie. Baltimore salvaged Game 3, winning 4-2 as Clay Buchholz outdueled Mike Krukow. Los Angeles reasserted control in Game Four, ripping 16 hits on their way to a 5-3 win, as Gary Sheffield homered and Dick Allen ripped two doubles. The Kangaroos clinched the Series in Game Five with a 3-1 victory, as Gables went seven strong innings, and both Allen and Sheffield homered. Gables was an easy choice for series MVP, going 2-0 against Baltimore with a 0.56 ERA and just five hits allowed in 16 innings. Sheffield led the Kangaroos' hitters with six postseason homers and 19 RBI's

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Old 06-21-2018, 09:05 AM   #44
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It's fun reading about guys that are dominating your league(s) that have dominated the various incarnations of my HRD leagues over the years. Guys like Mickey Mantle, Rick Monday, Bobby Thomson, Gary Sheffield, and Dick Allen. All were really good RL players, but it's fun to put their names in an HRD blender and see what comes out on the other side. Two questions: Who's the Buffalo backup second baseman who hit the walk-off, series winning HR in Game 4 in his only at-bat of the series against the Mad Hatters? Who's the Los Angeles Kangaroos' shortstop who led all hitters with a .455 average in the Division Series against the Miami Flamingos (love the franchise nicknames by the way - how did you come up with them?)? Not trying to be a pedant or anything, just curious.
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:33 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by actionjackson View Post
It's fun reading about guys that are dominating your league(s) that have dominated the various incarnations of my HRD leagues over the years. Guys like Mickey Mantle, Rick Monday, Bobby Thomson, Gary Sheffield, and Dick Allen. All were really good RL players, but it's fun to put their names in an HRD blender and see what comes out on the other side. Two questions: Who's the Buffalo backup second baseman who hit the walk-off, series winning HR in Game 4 in his only at-bat of the series against the Mad Hatters? Who's the Los Angeles Kangaroos' shortstop who led all hitters with a .455 average in the Division Series against the Miami Flamingos (love the franchise nicknames by the way - how did you come up with them?)? Not trying to be a pedant or anything, just curious.
Thanks for reading so closely, and I fixed it above. The backup Buffalo second baseman is the immortal Alex Kampouris (infielder from the 1930s-early 40s). The Los Angeles shortstop is Simon Nicholls (A's shortstop from the early 1900s). Nicholls has had a terrific career so far in my league - career average of .339 with a 115 OPS+ and 160 steals through four seasons. He's been even better in the postseason, with a .368 career average, a 138 OPS+ in 337 postseason at bats plus 25 steals, and was World Series MVP in the inaugural season.

No real rhyme or reason to the team nicknames- came up with them on a long layover. Some are locally appropriate animals (El Paso Armadillos, Miami Flamingos) or alliterative animals (Anaheim Antelopes), a few are takeoffs on other sports teams (Baltimore Robins), several deal with local industries/ attractions (San Diego Zookeepers, Dallas Wildcatters, Washington Ambassadors), and a few deal with local history (Detroit Purple Gang). And some, like the Kangaroos, are simply mascot-worthy animals.
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Old 06-22-2018, 01:31 PM   #46
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Thanks for reading so closely, and I fixed it above. The backup Buffalo second baseman is the immortal Alex Kampouris (infielder from the 1930s-early 40s). The Los Angeles shortstop is Simon Nicholls (A's shortstop from the early 1900s). Nicholls has had a terrific career so far in my league - career average of .339 with a 115 OPS+ and 160 steals through four seasons. He's been even better in the postseason, with a .368 career average, a 138 OPS+ in 337 postseason at bats plus 25 steals, and was World Series MVP in the inaugural season.

No real rhyme or reason to the team nicknames- came up with them on a long layover. Some are locally appropriate animals (El Paso Armadillos, Miami Flamingos) or alliterative animals (Anaheim Antelopes), a few are takeoffs on other sports teams (Baltimore Robins), several deal with local industries/ attractions (San Diego Zookeepers, Dallas Wildcatters, Washington Ambassadors), and a few deal with local history (Detroit Purple Gang). And some, like the Kangaroos, are simply mascot-worthy animals.
Watching an absolute no-name guy with a short career dominate is pretty fun too. In my OOTP16 game, one dominant pitcher was James Burke, and a dominant position player was Tillie Shafer. Both had RL careers that were nothing to write home about, yet somehow both wound up in my HoF.
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"If I die of vanity, promise me, promise me
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Away from the swollen city breeze, garbage bag trees
Whispers of disease and the acts of enormity
And lower me slowly and sadly and properly
Get Ry Cooder to sing my eulogy"

- RIP Gord Downie (The Tragically Hip) February 6th, 1964 - October 17th, 2017

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