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Old 04-19-2007, 01:25 PM   #321
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Tunney Tries for USBA LH TItle

Aug 31, 1918 Cow Palace, San Francisco: Gene Tunney steps into the ring, putting his unbeaten record on the line as he tries for his first title belt, the USBA LH crown, against a very tough opponent, former WBA Champ Tommy Gibbons. Tunney comes in as the #6 rated LH with a 16-0 (13) record, but Gibbons, the USBA titleholder, has vastly more experience in title bouts in compiling an impressive 25-5-1 (13) record that is good enough to hold down the #2 spot in the rankings.

Round one, the action is slow to develop as Tunney comes out looking to establish the jab. Gibbons is cautioned for a low blow, and the round ends with a slight edge to the challenger (Tunney).

Round two sees Gibbons working the outside while Tunney moves inside. Gibbons connects with a four-punch combination to put the Fighting Marine on his heels. A crushing cross by Tunney and Gibbons is forced to cover up. Tunney misses with a jab, but follows up with a big uppercut. A Tunney left hook and right cross follow, but Gibbons is able to fight back with a jab late in the round, avoiding disaster although it's clearly a big round for Tunney.

Third round, both men work the outside. Gibbons goes for the speed jab, Tunney counters with a big cross, both men exchange jabs, and Tunney comes on strongly at the end to take the round.

Round four, both elect to fight inside. Gibbons lands a right hand flush to the chin of Tunney. Gibbons follows up with a big left, then an uppercut and a jab. After four, it's 38-38 on the unofficial card.

Fifth round and both again are working outside. Gibbons traps Tunney in the corner, lands a combination, followed by a flurry by both men in the middle of the ring. Tunney lands a stinging jab. Gibbons misses wildly with a big hook but lands a couple of shots near the end to take the round.

Round six, Tunney is going for the KO while Gibbons is content to stay on the outside. Gibbons lands early, scoring with the jab, and Tunney counters with a right. Gibbons sneaks home a cross near the end, backing Tunney up. Unofficial cards have Gibbons ahead by 58-56.

Seventh round, Tunney tries the inside while Gibbons adopts a defensive posture. Tunney pursues Gibbons, both miss, Tunney lands an uppercut, Gibbons executes a piston-like jab, Tunney starts running out of gas as it's a slight edge to Gibbons at this point.

Round eight, Tunney elects to fight from the outside while it's Gibbons moving to the inside. Tunney lands a big uppercut. Gibbons swings and misses. Tunney is staggered by a cross, but comes back to land a flurry to win the round.

Ninth round, both work the inside. Tunney lands a big hook but Gibbons keeps snaking in with the jab to keep the round close. 88-84 on the unofficial card, indicating Tunney will need something dramatic to keep his unbeaten streak intact.

Round ten, Tunney is looking for the KO, but Gibbons is fighting defensively on the outside. Tunney is off target on his punches, and Gibbons once again shoots the jab. Tunney lands the lead right, it's a close round when the bell sounds.

Round 11, Tunney is clearly tiring now. Tunney fires a roundhouse left, Gibbons counters with a huge cross that stops Tunney in his tracks. It's clearly Gibbons' round and it looks like Tunney needs a KO to win.

Final round, an all-out effort by Tunney, who misses with a big right, Gibbons gets in a left hook and stays out of range for the rest of the way.

The judges' decision is announced, 116-112 on two cards, 117-112 on the third, all for Tommy Gibbons who keeps the USBA belt. Tunney's first loss drops him to 16-1 (13) and #8 in the LH rankings with 694 pp. On retrospect, it was perhaps too soon in Tunney's career to take on such a formidable opponent.
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Old 04-19-2007, 01:36 PM   #322
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Great win for Gibbons. Is Tunney not at Prime yet?
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Old 04-19-2007, 06:17 PM   #323
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Great stuff! You're right about Tunney in this case.

In my universe, Gibbons retired with a record of 32-5-1 (7 KOs). Never cracked the top ten, but had wins over Gus Christie, Tuffy Griffiths, Elzear Rioux and Denver Jack Geyer. Every time he stepped in with a top-ten heavy, he got clobbered. Glad to see he's done better in yours.

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Old 04-19-2007, 10:42 PM   #324
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Tunney Info

To respond to the question about Tunney's status, he will not hit Prime until after his 20th bout, so three more fights.

Turns out there was a rather significant error though in my report of that exciting Gibbons vs Tunney bout. It was for the NABF title belt, not the USBA title. So I need to post a correction on that. No mistaking the result, though, it was Gibbons by UD 12.
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Old 04-22-2007, 11:31 AM   #325
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Dempsey to Fight Wills for WBA Title

Just wanted to let everyone know I am headed into the homestretch of the 1918 bouts for the replay (Oct-Dec) and it turns out that Dempsey will challenge Wills in Nov. for the WBA Title. Probably will be posting the results in the next week or so, and this post will wrap up by Dempsey-Tunney series of reports as both have clearly risen to the cream of the crop of their respective divisions.

Starting in 1919, when there will be a very strong rookie crop, I intend to follow three very talented fighters from Day One of their careers, as I have done with Jack and Gene. These fighters will be: Pancho Villa (FLY), Mickey Walker (MW) and Tommy Loughran (LH). Stay posted.
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:20 PM   #326
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Dempsey vs Wills for WBA HW Crown

Nov 9, 1918 -- Los Angeles CA -- It's time now for the long-awaited World Title shot for Jack Dempsey, versus another stellar all-time great Harry Wills. Wills enters the bout with a 30-2-1 (25) record, while Dempsey is ranked #3 with a 26-0-1 (26) mark. Like all WBA title bouts, it's scheduled for 15 rounds. Without further ado, it's the Manassa Mauler versus the Black Panther.

Round one, after a cautious start, Dempsey pounds away at the head and body of the Champ. Wills counters with a quick cross. Dempsey splits his gloves with a jab. Both men take a step back after the opening flurry. A left hook scores for Dempsey. The round ends with both men clinching. Clear edge for Dempsey.

Second round sees Dempsey pressing Wills on the inside. The Black Panther tries to stay away. Wills misses. Dempsey lands a strong shot. Already there is some swelling around Wills' right eye. Undeterred, Wills retaliates with a huge uppercut. Dempsey responds with an uppercut of his own. Wills misses with an uppercut. Dempsey finishes a strong round with a big combination that staggers the Champ.

Round three, Dempsey is looking for the KO punch while Wills is adopting a more defensive posture. Dempsey rocks Wills with a strong combination. Wills is short with a leaping shot. A three-punch combo connects for Dempsey. Wills comes back strongly with a right hook that lands flush on the chin of Dempsey. Dempsey lands a cross. Wills misses, leaving himself open for a big hook by the Manassa Mauler. Wills evades a roundhouse right and manages to survive the round, which is clearly dominated by Dempsey.

Fourth round sees Dempsey shift to the outside. Wills, backed up against the ropes, flicks the jab to keep Dempsey at bay. Dempsey misses while Wills is beginning to find the range with his punches. Wills throws a big left that is sidestepped by Dempsey. The bell sounds, ending the best round of the fight thus far for Harry Wills.

Round five, Wills moves inside while Dempsey stays on the outside. Dempsey lands a jab. A straight right by Dempsey misses off the shoulder of Wills, who responds with a crunching cross. Dempsey fires and misses. Wills is on target with a big uppercut. Dempsey proves he can take a punch and comes back with a clean combination that drops Wills to the canvas. Wills stumbles a bit, but is back on his feet at the count of 7. With a minute left in the round, there's time for Dempsey to try to finish his man. Dempsey connects with a strong jab, followed by a jolting uppercut and a straight right. Wills manages to cover up and avoid further damage. After five, it's 49-45 Dempsey on the unofficial card.

Sixth round, and Dempsey moves back to the inside while Wills is once again fighting a defensive battle. Wills finds the range with a huge left hand. A three-punch combination scores for Dempsey. Wills dodges a lead right from the Manassa man. Wills is trapped in the corner, but he fights off Dempsey and snaps off a combination that backs up the challenger. Wills then lands a big right. Dempsey lands a big hook right before the bell. Huge action round, and the crowd is on its feet saluting both fighters' efforts.

Round seven, both elect to fight inside. Dempsey misses with a roundhouse punch, then a straight right connects for Wills. Dempsey clinches. A Wills right connects -- that punch had some steam on it! Dempsey responds with a brutal cross to the head. Wills fires a big left hand. Dempsey scores with a lead right. The bell sounds after another great round of action, slight edge this time to Wills, who has recovered from his trip to canvas two rounds earlier to make a real fight of it.

Eighth round, Dempsey comes out aggressively once more while Wills elects to stay on the outside. Dempsey tries to press the action on the inside, and Wills' jab comes up short. Wills leaves himself open for a big hook from Dempsey. A flurry of punches is blocked by Wills. Dempsey lands a jab and then seizes control with two wicked shots to the ribs of Wills. Wills clutches and grabs his opponent in an effort to slow down Dempsey. Dempsey frees himself to score with a strong uppercut right before the bell. Huge edge for Dempsey.

Round nine, Dempsey again is on the inside, forcing the action once more. Wills connects with a solid shot to the head. Wills, off balance, misses with a jab and leaves himself open for a crushing uppercut from the Manassa man. Dempsey is wild with a follow-up blow. Wills scores with a big hook. Dempsey scores with a devastating hook to the body as Wills was protecting his head. Right before the bell, Dempsey fires a three-punch combo that has the crowd roaring. A dejected Wills returns to his corner, which now has a cut lip to deal with in addition to the swollen right eye.

Tenth round, Dempsey is looking to end it while Wills' priority appears to be protecting his cut. Dempsey connects with a devastating cross. Wills, in trouble, tries clinching but Dempsey will have none of it, breaking free to unleash a crushing hook. Wills counters with a big cross. Dempsey pins Wills against the ropes. Wills whips a right hand. Dempsey now shows some puffiness under his left eye. Wills' punches lack sting, and Dempsey finishes the round strongly with a solid uppercut and a three punch combination, all of which find the target. After 10, the unofficial scorer has Dempsey winning by 97-93.

Round 11, Wills moves to the inside but Dempsey is still the aggressor, always looking for the knockout blow. Wills initiates the action with a hook to the body, then follows with a right that lands on target. Dempsey rocks Wills with a hook to the head. Dempsey follows with an uppercut that misses. Wills connects with a cross. Dempsey then connects with a huge uppercut that stops Wills in his tracks. In a delayed reaction, Wills slumps to the canvas. Wills tries to get up, but crumples to the canvas and is counted out. Jack Dempsey is the new World Heavyweight champ, scoring a KO at 2:34 of round 11.

The win runs Dempsey's career stats to 27 wins and one draw, all of the wins by knockout. His 1378 career pp are good only for third among active HWs as Sam Langford and Sam McVey, who battled for the NABF title belt earlier in the night, still have more PPs. But those men will have to wait until 1919 for a chance to dethrone Dempsey who has fulfilled all the promise of his early years as a top unbeaten prospect.
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:44 PM   #327
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Good stuff JC, the ascension is complete.....I think at this point Langford would provide the stiffest test for the new Champ, is Sam still at Prime?
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:30 AM   #328
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Langford Still at Prime ...

Yep, Langford is still at Prime but he's fought so often he's about 3-4 bouts away from hitting Post based on the declining retirement points method. I can tell you the two of them (Langford and Dempsey) did not draw the same month for their initial 1919 bouts, so that dream bout with both of them at Prime may or may not happen. Langford did just beat McVey (again) so he will be the #1 contender when the rankings come out.
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Old 05-01-2007, 12:06 PM   #329
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1918-Heavyweight Part I

1918 action has been concluded, so here is the first of the year-end reports, starting with the HWs.

1918 HW Title Bouts

WBA

Harry Wills CH (27-2-1) vs Jeff Clarke #7 (32-9-2)

Wills' second defense comes against the "Joplin Ghost," who is making his second try for the WBA title, having lost to Langford back in 1911. Wills scored a UD 12 over Clarke in their only prior bout, back in 1915.

Wills looks sharp early, taking the opening round. Wills connects with a big left hook, staggering the challenger early in round two, but the Joplin Ghost recovers to come only strong at the end of the round. Clarke is the aggressor for the next few rounds, but it's Wills who lands most of the scoring blows, causing swelling around Clarke's right eye. Wills puts Clarke on the canvas in round 6 when he lands a strong shot. Another KD follows in round seven, but it isn't until round 10 when Harry lands the coup-de-grace. Wills by KO 10.

Harry Wills CH (28-2-1) vs Tommy Burns #3 (47-13-5)

The veteran ex-Champ, who managed a draw with Wills in a prior bout, gets a rematch after coming off a UD 10 over Jess Willard.

The bout doesn't last very long, as Wills shocks the Canadian fans by taking out Burns with a strong shot in round one. Wills by KO 1.

Harry Wills CH (29-2-1) vs Otto Flint #14 (24-7-2)

Wills' next opponent is the long-time EBU champ, Flint, who is making his first try for the WBA title.

Wills dominates the round one, while Flint has difficulty getting on track. The Black Panther builds his points lead with a strong performance in the round four, but an aggressive Flint gets going with a big uppercut that buckles the knees of the Champ in round four. Flint comes back with a strong round five, and the unofficial cards have him ahead (48-47) after five. Flint continues to press forward, but sustains a cut above the right eye in round 6. Wills targets the cut and gradually begins to wear down his tired opponent starting in round 8. Round 10, Wills puts Flint on the canvas after both men mix it up on the inside. The end comes in the following round when, after a second trip to the canvas, a groggy Flint is out on his feet. The ref stops the bout with two seconds left in the round. Wills by TKO 11.

Harry Wills CH (30-2-1) vs Jack Dempsey #3 (26-0-1)

See post #326 for a blow-by-blow summary of this bout, which sees Jack Dempsey capture the HW crown.

NABF: Sam Langford defended the belt three times in 1918, first versus aging vet Joe Jeannette (now pushing 40), dominating from early in the round when Jeannette was cut, scoring four KDs en route to a TKO in the 10th when the cut was too severe for Jeannette to continue. Then it was veteran Frank Moran, the Pittsburgh Dentist, who put up some stiff resistance and actually ripped open a cut above Langford's left eye, before going down to a narrow UD 12 defeat. Finally, Langford took on his old rival, Sam McVey, breaking open a close bout when he floored McVey with a huge uppercut from which McVey did not recover -- Langford by KO 8.

USBA: Dempsey defended the title versus Willard (see Post #315) and Miske (see Post #320) before taking on Wills. The USBA belt is now vacant and will be up for grabs some time in early 1919.

CBU: Langford defended this belt once in 1918, versus the resurgent Aussie Colin Bell -- the bout mirrored the Moran bout in that Langford survived a cut above the eye to register a UD 12 win to keep the belt.

GBU: Three bouts for the GBU belt, which changed hands twice in 1918. Joe Beckett defended versus "Bandsman" Dick Rice, dominating with KDs in rounds 4, 6 and 7 with Rice being counted out in round 7. In his next defense he found Joe Goddard to be too strong, as the "Fighting Farmer" (Goddard) recovered from a slow start to register a MD 12 win to take the belt. Goddard, in turn, was bested by Charlie Penwill, who overcame a bloody nose to score a KD in the final round to cinch a UD 12 victory.

EBU: German Otto Flint defended once, versus Irishman Bob Devere. In a rather boring bout absent of any knockdowns, Flint managed to outbox his younger opponent to ring up a comfortable UD 12 win.
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Old 05-01-2007, 12:48 PM   #330
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1918-Heavyweight Part II

Jan 1919 Division Profile

Total: 161 RL: 85 TCs: 76

RL by Career Stage:
End - 5
Post - 9
Prime - 47
Pre - 12
Beginning - 12 (11 New)

Rated: 59
800+: 11
500+: 21
200+: 45

Jan 1919 Rankings (Perf Pts and Changes from Jan 1918 in Parens)

Champ: Jack Dempsey 27-0-1 (27) (1378) (+6)
1. Sam Langford 62-9-1 (46) (1629) (NC)
2. Sam McVey 48-12-2 (29) (1424) (NC)
3. Harry Wills 30-3-1 (25) (1377) (-3)
4. Carl Morris 27-8 (16) (1036) (+15)
5. Tommy Burns 48-15-5 (32) (1035) (-2)
6. Colin Bell 27-13-3 (12) (970) (+5)
7. Frank Moran 33-13-1 (18) (945) (+1)
8. Joe Jeannette 47-10 (34) (944) (-4)
9. Bartley Madden 24-5-3 (11) (910) (+1)
10. Jeff Clarke 33-11-2 (23) (902) (-3)

Comments: All the above at Prime except for Burns, who hit post in 1918, and Jeannette, who has suffered the effects of aging for the past two years. Dempsey's rise to the top has been well documented. Langford, who remains the top rated HW in terms of PP totals, went 4-0 in 1918, all in title bouts. McVey scored a KO over Willard and a UD over Flint but lost to Langford to go 2-1 for the year. Wills slipped to #3 after his 7-bout win streak was snapped by the Manassa Mauler. Carl Morris made a huge move up the ratings with five wins in 1918, including KOs versus Fireman Jim Flynn and Joe Jeannette, a SD over Burns, and a controversial DQ over Billy Miske. Burns only won once, a KO 4 versus Gunboat Smith, against two losses, so he slipped to #5. Bell returned to the top 10 with wins over Jim Savage (via TKO), LH Tommy Gibbons (a MD) and Ireland's Jim Coffey (UD). Frank Moran was 2-1 for the year, handing Paul Samson-Korner his first loss to retain his top ten status. Jeannette lost both fights in 1918 and his days in the top 10 may be numbered. Madden was stopped in his rematch with Dempsey but scored UDs over Clarke and Thompson. Clarke clings to the #10 spot despite the losses to Wills and Madden, impressing in a KO over Fred Fulton and a UD over Willie "Sailor" Meehan.

Other Notables: Dropping out of the top group were Billy Miske, who fell six spots to #11 after the KO loss to Dempsey and the DQ loss to Morris and Jess Willard, who fell from #9 to #13, having now lost five in a row after an 0-3 year, plus aging effects put him at Post-Prime going into 1919 (the year he hits 38). On a more positive note, Bill Brennan went 4-0 for the year to advance to #12, with KOs over Willard, McMahon and Gunboat Smith helping push his career mark to 22-6 (18). EBU beltholder Flint checks in at #14, with a 24-8-2 (19) career record and 724 pp. Jim Savage, at #15, also hits Post-Prime in 1919. German Samson-Korner had compiled 16 wins in a row before the initial loss to Moran, but bounced back with a TKO over Arthur Pelkey to debut at #16 with a 17-1 (15) mark. Fat LaRue, who is still unbeaten, debuts at #19 with a 15-0 (6) record, scoring a UD over Andy Morris and a SD over Marty Cutler to go with his numerous wins versus TCs. Aussie George Cook debuts at #26, impressing in a MD over fellow Aussie Ern Waddy to go with a UD win over Fred Storbeck; his only loss to date has been at the expense of Swede, Ragnar Holmberg. Finally, newly-crowned GBU champ Penwill is ranked #32, hia 19-5-1 (12) record good for only 355 pp, once again proving that British HWs get no respect.

Prospects: Everyone is still unbeaten against the usual TC opposition, including Brits Arthur Townley, at 11-0-1 (4) and Herbert Crossley, at 10-0 (7); Argentina's Luis Firpo, at 9-0 (7); Battling Jim McCreary, at 7-0 (4); Tiny Herman, 6-0 (3); Holland's Piet Van der Veer, 5-0-1 (3); Canadian Jack Renault, 5-0 (2); and South African Nick Van Den Bergh, 4-0 (2).

Retirements: Five HWs left the ranks in 1918. Their career marks:

Fireman Jim Flynn (USA) 1903-1918 33-21-3 (19) No Titles Highest Rank:17
William Hague (UK) 1907-1918 21-19 (14) GBU Champ Highest Rank: 11
Victor McLaglen (UK) 1908-18 17-19-5 (7) No Titles Highest Rank: 14
Fred McKay (CAN) 1912-18 14-14-2 (4) No Titles Highest Rank: 42
Al Kaufmann (USA) 1904-18 34-21-1 (23) No Titles Highest Rank: 8

Al Kaufmann is an interesting case study, typical of many of the HWs who have come and gone in recent years (the so-called "Great White Hope" era). Kaufmann won his first 14 in a row but then won only about 50% of his fights for the remainder of his career, as the competition just got too tough.

Looking Ahead: The only fighters who appear likely to prove serious impediments to a long title run by Dempsey are the top two contenders, Langford and McVey. Carl Morris may be angling for Dempsey's recently vacated USBA belt. Miske might still be in the picture as well, but look for aging veterans such as Burns, Jeannette and Willard to fade from the scene. Colin Bell might be ready to ascend to the CBU title, if only Langford could be pushed aside somehow. Bartley Madden still seems to be the toughest potential challenger for Flint's EBU title. Samson-Korner and Firpo appear to be the best of the newer crop of prospects. 1919 will see a plethora of young HW boxers enter the ranks, led by George Godfrey and "Fainting" Phil Scott.

Predictions: Didn't do well on last year's big prediction, as I had Wills over Dempsey for the WBA belt. Also was wrong on Samson-Korner taking the EBU belt. For 1919, I will once again go out on the proverbial limb by forecasting a Langford win over Dempsey to regain the WBA title. I will predict that Carl Morris will get a shot at the USBA belt, but that he will lose that title to the more talented Harry Wills. I will also predict Madden over Flint for the EBU belt.

Last edited by JCWeb; 06-18-2007 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 05-01-2007, 01:17 PM   #331
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Good stuff JC .. looking forward to 1913 when Dempsey will join the LBA
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Old 05-01-2007, 02:53 PM   #332
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1918-Light Heavyweight Part I

1918 LH Title Bouts

WBA

Jack Dillon CH (35-5-3) vs Leo Houck #4 (38-16-4)

Dillon had beaten Houck twice before for the LH title in 1913 and 1915 after being held to a draw in their initial encounter in 1911. Dillon was gunning for win #5 in a row while Houck entered the bout riding a 3-fight win streak, including a DQ over Levinsky and UDs versus Sweeney and Dave Smith.

Dillon took charge early, dominating the bout on the outside to gain an early points edge. (49-46 after five rounds) In the middle rounds, Dillon continued to pile up a huge lead, and Houck wound up taking a serious beating, suffering from swelling about his right eye. Dillon went on to register a dominating UD 15 win.

Jack Dillon CH (36-5-3) vs Tommy Gibbons #2 (25-4-1)

Dillon seeks to avenge an earlier loss (via TKO) to Gibbons who took his title belt back in 1915.

Gibbons is off to a strong start, taking the opening stanza. Jack "The Giant Killer" bounces back to take round two. Both elect to work on the inside in round three, leaving to a close action round. Round four, Gibbons tries his luck on the inside, but Dillon bombs away from the outside to take the round. Fifth round sees Gibbons back on top to lead (48-47) on the unofficial cards in an extremely close bout. Dillon moves inside in round 6, but a big cross lands for Gibbons, forcing the Champ to cover up. In round 8, Gibbons suffers a split lip but continues to make it a difficult defense for Dillon. The Champ picks up the pace in the final few rounds, overcoming a swollen right eye to dominate action on the inside and scoring a close but unanimous win (143-141, 144-140, 143-141).

Jack Dillon CH (37-5-3) vs Georges Carpentier #1 (35-3-2)

The French EBU and ex-WBA Champ, who lost the title to Dillon in 1917, is back to try again, coming off a UD 10 over Bob McAllister.

Dillon starts well, taking the initial round but then Carpentier moves to the inside, doing well in rounds 2 and 3. Both lay back on the outside in round 4, and the tide turns to favor Dillon. Dillon also takes round 5 to move ahead, 48-47, on the unofficial cards. Carpentier presses forward, but only sets himself up for more Dillon countershots. Round seven, with both men whaling away on the inside, sees more action as Carpentier nails the Champ with a big uppercut and follows up with a combination that causes Dillon to tumble to the canvas. A big left for the Frenchman in round 8, and Dillon is forced to cover up to survive. Round 9, Dillon is in full retreat but Carpentier can't deliver the knockout punch. Carpentier is cut on the nose in round 10 but is ahead 96-93 on the unofficial card. Dillon keeps the bout close with a huge round 13, and when the bout goes the distance, most observers think Carpentier deserved the win. However, the scores are read and it's a unanimous win (144-142, 144-142, 145-141) for Dillon, who narrowly escapes with his title.

Jack Dillon CH (38-5-3) vs Battling Levinsky #5 (31-11-1)

This is Levinksy's second try for the WBA belt, having lost a SD to Dillon back in 1914. Levinsky had won four bouts earlier in the year to set up the title match.

Levinsky gets off to a strong start, planting a hook to the body of Dillon in round one. The Champ quickly recovers, battling to an even round 2 and then pummeling Levinksy in round three, and Levinsky's right eye exhibits signs of swelling. Dillon goes on to dominate rounds 4 and 5 and is off to a strong start (50-47 on the unofficial card). Levinksy gradually becomes more aggressive in the middle rounds, but Dillon continues to dominate from a very defensive-minded posture on the outside. Dillon's right eye starts to swell in the later round, but a frustrated a tired Levinksy, trailing badly on all three cards, finds himself called for a flagrant low blow and is DQ'd in round 14. Dillon retains the title.

NABF: Frank Farmer starts the year with this title belt, which he puts on the line versus Tommy Gibbons. Gibbons survives a cut above the eye and dominates most of the action to register a UD 12 win. Then comes the previously-reported (Post #321) defense against a young Gene Tunney, who turned out to be overmatched. Finally, Larry Williams took on Gibbons late in the year and he, too, came up on the short end of a UD 12 verdict after Gibbons knocked him down twice in the 11th.

USBA: Bob McAllister defended the belt versus Kid Norfolk, who took advantage of an early cut over the left eye of McAllister and went on to register a UD 12 win to take the title. Norfolk then defended versus "KO" Kruvosky who took two trips to the canvas before the bout was waived off as a TKO for Norfolk in the 11th.

CBU: Harry Reeve did not defend this belt, which he captured in late 1917.

GBU: Reeve did defend versus fellow Brit Dick Smith, taking charge with a dominating fourth round before the ref stepped in to save the challenger from further punishment. Reeve by TKO 4.

EBU: Carpentier defended versus Reeve, whom he had beaten four times previously. Once again, the Brit was no match for the wily Frenchman, who hammered Reeve with an uppercut, scoring a KD in the second and following up with a second knockdown from which Reeve did not recover. Carpentier by KO 2.
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Old 05-01-2007, 03:07 PM   #333
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great stuff!
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Old 05-01-2007, 03:59 PM   #334
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1918-Light Heavyweight Part II

Jan 1919 Division Profile

Total: 68 RL: 36 TC: 32

RL by Career Stage:
End - 0
Post - 3
Prime - 18
Pre - 8
Beginning -7 (6 New)

Rated: 24
800+: 5
500+: 13
200+: 22

Jan 1919 Rankings (Perf Pts and Changes from Jan 1918 in Parens)

Champ: Jack Dillon 39-5-3 (15) (1187) (NC)
1. Georges Carpentier 36-4-2 (25) (1006) (NC)
2. Tommy Gibbons 27-6-1 (13) (949) (+1)
3. Kid Norfolk 24-2 (14) (919) (+4)
4. Bob McAllister 33-9-1 (20) (903) (-2)
5. Battling Levinsky 31-12-1 (14) (780) (+1)
6. Battling Siki 19-5-3 (13) (700) (-1)
7. Gene Tunney 16-2 (13) (646) (new)
8. Charles Grande 18-11-1 (6) (573) (+3)
9. Leo Houck 40-19-4 (12) (572) (-5)
10. Larry Williams 22-11 (12) (562) (+2)

Comments: All the above will enter 1919 at Prime, except for McAllister (who his Post as 1919 was his last year IRL) and Tunney (who has two more bouts at Pre before hitting Prime). Dillon has now won 8 in a row and stands firmly entrenched atop the division once again. Carpentier was held to a draw by Bob Devere in his brief foray into the HW ranks, but he retained his LH EBU title and scored a UD over McAllister but failed in a title rematch with Dillon. Tommy Gibbons lost a MD to HW Colin Bell, but went 2-1 in three LH title bouts. Norfolk is the division's hot property, having now won 8 in a row to sweep the USBA belt, taking UD wins over Choynski and Houck plus a split duke over Siki. McAllister went 2-2 for the year, losing to Carpentier but downing Dave Smith and Gene Tunney (both UDs). Levinsky had won four in a row before losing the title bout to Dillon. Siki only had one win, a KO over Albert Lloyd, in a rather forgettable year. Tunney, who started out with 16 straight wins, faltered not only losing the NABF title bout to Gibbons but also a UD 10 to McAllister later in the year. Grande regained his top 10 status by snapping a 5-bout losing streak with a DQ win over Leo Houck. Houck fell in the rankings as he won only two of five 1918 bouts. Larry Williams rounds out the top ten, scoring a KO over Wiggins and UDs versus McTigue and Choynski before losing the NABF title tilt with Gibbons.

Other Notables: Sweeney fell from #9 to #11 after a loss to Houck and a draw with Siki, but he did score a KO win over Choynski. McTigue slid four spots to #12, suffering UD losses to Williams and Levinsky but redeeming himself with a UD 10 over Frank Farmer. Farmer dropped from #10 to #13, beating Morrow but suffering UD losses to McTigue and Levinsky. Dave Smith, the ousted CBU champ, still ranks #14 with two wins over Lloyd (MD) and Trembley (UD) to lift him ahead of Reeve, the current CBU and GBU titleholder, who stands at #16 with a spotty 18-12-1 (15) record, worth 318 pp. Top newcomers, after Tunney, were Edward "KO" Kruvosky, who enters the ranks at #17, with a 15-3 (12) record, going 4-2 in a busy year, losses coming to Norfolk (TKO) and Turner (UD) but he avenged the Turner defeat with a MD 10 win later in the year, and Eddie Trembley, whose 11-4 (9) mark put him at #19 despite four straight losses after winning his first 11.

Prospects: Lou Bogash moves to the top of the prospect list, winning his last 13 after losing his opening bout, including a UD 10 over Brit Dick Smith. Pat McCarthy has compiled a 12-1 (6) record, his only loss coming at the hands of Gene Tunney. Ted Jamieson and Joe Lohman remain unbeaten, having drawn with each other earlier in their careers. Brits Tom Berry and Jack Bloomfield kept their slates clean versus TC competition.

Retirements: None in 1918.

Looking Ahead: Dillon may be poised for another long title run, and right now Norfolk appears to be his most logical challenger. It remains to be seen how much longer Carpentier will stay in the LH ranks or be lured into the HW division. Same may be true for rugged Tommy Gibbons. Levinsky, Siki, Tunney and McTigue may need to regroup a bit, although Tunney probably has the brightest long-term prospects once he hits his stride in Prime career stage. Bogash and Jamieson should reach the Top 20 if not the Top 10 in 1919. A very strong rookie crop led by Tommy Loughran and Canada's Jack Delaney is set to swell the ranks of this still thin division in 1919.

Predictions: Have to say I did rather well in my 1918 forecasts for the LH division. Dillon to retain WBA belt -- correct. Norfolk to win a lesser belt -- correct. McTigue to win a lesser belt -- wrong. Carpentier to keep EBU title -- correct. Tunney to reach Top 10 but not capture a title belt -- correct. Four out of five correct predictions -- not bad.
For 1919, I will forecast a Dillon victory in the title showdown with Kid Norfolk. I expect to see Tunney capture a lesser USBA or NABF title, probably the USBA belt, once he gets 20 bouts under his belt to reach Prime career stage. Look for Aussie Dave Smith to regain the CBU belt from Reeve. Carpentier will continue as EBU LH champ as long as he wants to stay in the division.
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Old 05-01-2007, 07:51 PM   #335
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1918-Middleweight Part I

1918 MW Title Bouts

WBA

Harry Greb CH (23-2) vs Gus Platts (19-11-3)

Platts qualifies for a World title shot despite not being rated in the Top 20 because he holds the EBU and GBU title belts. Greb is seeking a relatively easy defense and his fifth win in a row.

Not much action in the opening stanza, but Greb comes on strong at the end of the round. Platts holds his own in rounds two and three, staying on the outside while Greb tries to force the action on the inside. The Human Windmill continues to press forward, finally wearing the challenger down, finally dominating the toe-to-toe action in round 7 when he dishes out enough punishment to lead to a TKO win. Nonetheless, Platts turned out to be a surprisingly tough nut for Greb to crack.

Harry Greb CH (24-2) vs Jeff Smith #4 (29-7)

Greb is looking to avenge a SD loss to Smith from early 1917. Smith is coming off a TKO win over Johnny Wilson and a UD over McGoorty.

Action is slow to develop after a cautious start by both men. Greb begins to gain the upper hand in round 3, then unleashes a wild overhand right that puts Smith on the canvas in round 4. Greb tries mightily to put Smith away in round 5, but some strong defense and the challenger is right back in the fight. Greb continues to hold the edge until he sustains a bad cut above his right eye in round 8. Smith targets the cut, which proves to be a difficult one to control. Greb is actually well ahead on all three cards when the cut becomes too severe to continue, and Smith is awarded the crown via an 11th round TKO due to the cut.

Jeff Smith CH (30-7) vs Eddie McGoorty #6 (38-15-1)

McGoorty makes his third try for the WBA title, having lost to Ketchel in 1908 and Gibbons in 1916, both KO losses. His recent UD loss to Smith in early 1918 does not seem to help his prospects.

Both men have their moments in a couple of action-packed early rounds. McGoorty takes the third round, Smith dominates the fourth, then McGoorty takes charge on the inside to compile a 49-47 lead after five on the unofficial card. Smith becomes more aggressive in rounds 6 and 7, keeping the bout close. McGoorty goes on the attack in round 8, landing several strong shots that hurt the Champ. McGoorty gets in a strong hook in round 10, and manages to maintain control in a close battle (with no knockouts), taking the UD 15 decision (145-140, 146-139, 144-142) and finally he ascends to the WBA MW throne after many years of effort.

NABF: Four NABF title bouts during 1918. Billy Papke defends versus Al McCoy, who surprises Papke with an uppercut for a KD of the Champ in round 5. Papke is cut above the eye in round 6 but is able to rally in the later rounds, scoring three KDs in the 11th to keep the belt via a TKO 11. Then Mike O'Dowd steps in against Papke, content to play a waiting game in a very close bout, coming on strong at the end to take a narrow SD 12 decision and the belt. O'Dowd defends versus Jack McCarron, who stuns O'Dowd with some strong shots in round 7 but gradually runs out of gas, allowing O'Dowd to score three KDs en route to a TKO 11 win. Then, ex-champ Mike Gibbons mounts a strong challenge, but O'Dowd withstands a late surge and a cut above the eye to register a UD 12 win to keep the belt.

USBA: Fighting Billy Murray takes on O'Dowd, who overcomes a split lip and a strong surge by Murray in the final round to take the title with a close but UD 12. O'Dowd then steps up to take the NABF belt, creating a vacany. Mike Gibbons is matched with Joe Chip for the vacant title, and Gibbons stuns Chip in the second round and then maintains the edge to the end, registering a solid UD 12 win.

CBU: Jake Ahearn faces Gus Platts in a unification bout that has both the CBU and GBU belts at stake. It's a bruising battle, as each man has a win, a loss and a draw in their three prior meetings. Ahearn suffers a cut mouth and a bloody nose, Platts has a swollen left eye, but in the end it's a SD 12 verdict in favor of Ahearn. Ahearn then defends the CBU title versus the aging Aussie, Les Darcy, but this time the "Maitland Wonder" proves to be a shadow of his former self, going down meekly in a rather boring UD 12, a lopsided win for Ahearn.

GBU: Ahearn held the belt after winning the unification bout with Platts.

EBU: Platts defended versus the Dane, Chic Nelson, and had a better time than against Ahearn, scoring a KD in the final round to seal a UD 12 victory.
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Old 05-01-2007, 08:11 PM   #336
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Wow, shocked at Grebs loss to Smith. Surely he deserves a crack at McGoorty in the upcoming year.
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Old 05-01-2007, 08:58 PM   #337
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1918-Middleweight Part II

Jan 1919 Division Profile

Total: 138 RL: 75 TC: 63

RL by Career Stage:
End - 1
Post - 6
Prime - 47
Pre - 10
Beginning - 11 (7 New)

Rated: 57
800+: 9
500+: 25
200+: 54

Jan 1919 Rankings (Perf Pts and Changes from Jan 1918 in Parens)

Champ: Eddie McGoorty 39-15-1 (32) (1016) (+3)
1. Mike O'Dowd 24-5 (11) (1172) (+9)
2. Mike Gibbons 33-5-1 (13) (1171) (-1)
3. Harry Greb 24-3 (17) (1129) (-3)
4. Jeff Smith 30-8 (14) (1015) (+3)
5. Billy Papke 38-7-3 (25) (1003) (-3)
6. Joe Borrell 23-8-1 (15) (966) (NC)
7. Panama Joe Gans 21-2 (13) (901) (+2)
8. Fighting Billy Murray 23-9-2 (14) (826) (-3)
9. Jack McCarron 27-11-2 (13) (774) (-5)
10. George "KO" Brown 28-11-2 (13) (771) (+2)

Comments: All at Prime, but Papke will hit Post with his next fight, as 1919 was his final year IRL. McGoorty finally made it to the top of this topsy-turvy division, which has seen three new Champs in the last four title bouts after a long reign by Gibbons. McGoorty overcame years of frustration and two losses to Smith and Gans, avenging the Smith loss in capturing the title. O'Dowd may be the division's strongest fighter right now, having won his last eight in a row, four in 1918 (all NABF or USBA title bouts). Ex-Champ Gibbons suffered a UD loss to O'Dowd but remains a top-notch contender. Smith had a three-bout win streak snapped by the loss to McGoorty. Papke went 2-1 for the year, scoring TKOs over Downey and McCoy but losing the NABF title belt to O'Dowd. Borrell won both bouts in 1918, over Downey (a UD) and Murray (a TKO) but no title bouts this year. Gans won three in a row, UD wins over Jimmy Darcy, Grayber and McGoorty and is now looking for a title shot. Murray went 2-2 for the year, scoring a UD over Ahearn and a KO over Christie but lost the USBA title and also a TKO loss to Borrell. McCarron had only one win (a UD 10 over Ashe) but managed to stay in the Top 10. Moving up was George "KO" Brown, who wons UDs over Mantell and Johnny Wilson to extend his consecutive win streak to three.

Other Notables: Only one Top 10 dropout this time, Johnny Wilson, who slipped four spots to #13, suffering the loss to Brown in addition to a TKO loss to Smith, although a UD 10 over Joe Chip kept him from falling further. Lurking outside the Top 10 at #11 is Bryan Downey, who won three of five in 1918, decisioning McCarron but losing to Borrell. "Buck" Crouse checks in at #12, recovering from a UD loss to Grayber with wins over McCoy and George Robinson. Gus Christie had a solid year, scoring UD 10s over Moha and Silent Martin to wind up #16 with a 25-8-2 (12) mark. McCoy had another up and down season to wind up #17, defeating Johnny Howard but losing to O'Dowd and Crouse. CBU/GBU champ Ahearn has compiled a 29-10-1 (14) mark, defending both belts but losing a UD to Murray. His 599 pp are good enough for the #18 rank. One spot below is this year's top debutant, Johnny Gill, still perfect at 15-0 (7), but only one win over an aging RL boxer (Sailor Ed Petroskey). Jimmy Darcy won three in a row to move his record to 17-2-2 (6), rounding out the top 20. Joe Chip is still ahead of his brother George, but George was unbeaten in 1918 with two wins and a draw to move up to 25th spot with 492 pp. EBU beltholder Platts is mired in 33rd spot with 428 pp and a 20-13-3 (8) record.

Prospects: Jock Malone remained unbeaten, running his record to 13-0-1 (6), beating Petroskey but being held to a draw in a bout with fellow prospect Kid Mexico. Gordon McKay is 11-0 (7), all versus TC opposition. Mexico suffered the one loss and a draw to Malone -- his mark stands at 11-1-2 (6). Brit Roland Todd, at 8-0 (3), and "Little Fox," Belgian Rene DeVos, at 7-0 (6), continued their winning ways versus TC competition. Starting out well were Billy Shade, with 5 KO wins in five bouts, and Tiger Flowers, with 4 KOs in his first four bouts. Dave Shade, Frankie Schoell, and Allentown Joe Gans also have clean slates but are still in Beginner mode.

Retirements: Two former Champs were among those MWs who hung 'em up in 1918. Their career marks:

Cyclone Johnny Thompson (USA) 1902-18 34-27 (22) WBA Champ (3 times)
Walter Coffey (USA) 1905-18 31-22 (18) USBA Champ Highest Rank: 8
Joe Thomas (USA) 1906-18 24-22-2 (12) WBA Champ Highest Rank: 6
Sailor Ed Petroskey (USA) 1910-18 18-21 (13) No Titles Highest Rank: 38

Looking Ahead: O'Dowd looks like the next logical title contender. Greb may be fed up with the MW division, and might contemplate a step up to LH. Mike Gibbons remains a solid challenger. Gans seeks a title shot, probably for the NABF belt. Papke is likely to fade rather quickly once he hits Post-Prime in 1919. Mantell is still hoping for a EBU title shot in an effort to revive his flagging career. Among the second 10, Downey and Wilson may still emerge as top contenders should the opportunity arise.
A strong crop of newcomers in 1919, led by Mickey Walker, Canadian Eugene Brosseau and Dave Rosenberg.

Predictions: A pretty bad year for predictions -- actually, oh-for-four as I inaccurately had Greb hanging onto the WBA belt, had Panama Joe Gans taking the NABF crown (he didn't get a title shot), had Mantell taking the EBU belt back (he didn't get a shot either), and had three new faces in the Top 10 when only one spot changed hands.
So, for 1919, I will predict a NABF title try for Gans, only to lose to Gibbons. McGoorty will lose if he faces O'Dowd for the WBA title, which should change hands more than once in 1919. I will also once again predict a EBU title for Mantell.
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Old 05-02-2007, 12:13 AM   #338
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1918-Welterweight Part I

1918 WW Title Bouts

WBA

Art Magirl CH (25-2) vs Kid Graves #4 (32-9-3)

Magirl gives Graves his first World title shot, despite a recent loss. The Champ is seeking his 15th successive win. First meeting of the two.

Magirl, the "Oklahoma Whirlwind," pours it on in the early rounds, building a solid 50-47 lead on the unofficial card after five. Graves suffers from a split lip early in the fight. A huge right nails Graves near the end of round 7. The challenger starts to tire as early as the 9th round. In round 11, Magirl rocks Graves with a straight right. The cut is reopened a round later, leading to an early stoppage. Magirl by TKO 12 (cut).

Art Magirl CH (26-2) vs Johnny Basham #5 (26-7-3)

First meeting. Basham comes into the bout with the CBU belt, having won his last four in a row. On paper, looks like a stiff challenge for Magirl.

After a cautious start by both men, Basham dominates on the outside in round two. Magirl gets much more aggressive at the start of the third, rocking Basham with a big left that forces the Brit to cover up. Magirl takes advantage quickly, and the result is an early stoppage. Magirl by TKO 3.

Art Magirl CH (27-2) vs Ted Kid Lewis #10 (26-10-3)

Ted Kid Lewis, the man whom Magirl defeated to take the crown back in 1916, gets another shot.

The Oklahoma Whirlwind looks sharp early, round one to Magirl. Both stay outside in round two, slight edge to Lewis. Magirl moves inside in round three, but Lewis scores well enough to take the round. Magirl pounds away from the outside to take round four. Toe-to-toe action in round 5 favors Lewis, who is ahead by a narrow 48-47 margin on the unofficial card. Magirl gets aggressive in round 6, suffering a cut above his right eye while connecting with a right hand flush on the chin of Lewis. The challenger covers up to survive the round. Lewis's head clears and he targets the cut in round 7. Magirl is back on the attack in round 8, another strong round for the Champ. Magirl dominates some toe-to-toe action on the inside in round nine, but the cut above his eye is reopened. Lewis takes advantage in round 10, dishing out some major punishment as both of Magirl's eyes start to swell. It's a close bout, 95-all, going into the final five rounds. The bout flows back and forth over the final rounds, and Lewis' right eye starts to swell from the accumulated effect of Magirl's punches. No KDs, the bout comes down to the wire, and the final result is ... a majority draw (145-141 Magirl, 143-143 on the two remaining cards). Magirl escapes with the title but his consecutive win streak is snapped at 16.

NABF: Packey McFarland, holder of this belt since 1910, defended it twice in 1918: first, versus Canadian Frank Barrieau, who gets off to a good start and manages to keep the bout close although McFarland wears Barrieau down for a UD 12 win; second, McFarland takes on his long-time nemesis, Jack Britton, turning the tables after two prior losses when Britton suffers a cut that gradually worsens, leading to a TKO 9 win for McFarland.

USBA: Britton defends against Johnny Alberts, taking charge in round four when he decked Alberts; a cut on the bridge of the nose of Albert gradually worsened and led to a round 9 stoppage, TKO for Britton. Britton then took on long-time contender Eddie Shevlin, built an early lead but was dethroned when called for flagrant holding and hitting -- DQ win for Shevlin in round 11. An immediate rematch was arranged, and this time Britton piled up a huge points lead that he put in jeopardy when Shevlin knocked him down in round 10. Britton held on to score a narrow SD 12 victory to regain the belt.

CBU: Basham defended the belt once in 1918, versus Aussie Tommy Uren. Basham had the bout well under control, when an overly-aggressive Uren was cut above the left eye in round 10. The cut led to a late stoppage for Basham (TKO 12), who was well ahead on points anyway.

GBU: Johnny Summers defended versus Ted Kid Lewis, who outboxed Summers throughout most of the bout and appeared to be headed toward an easy points win, until in a real shock, Lewis was called for holding and hitting, and Summers awarded the win on a DQ in round 12.

EBU: Dick Nelson defended versus his fellow Dane, Waldemar Holberg. Holberg was cut early but built up a points lead; however, the cut became too severe to continue, and Nelson kept the belt via a TKO 11. Nelson started well in his next bout with Johnny Summers, but Summers rallied in the middle rounds to register a UD 12 win, adding the EBU title to his GBU belt.
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Old 05-02-2007, 12:58 AM   #339
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1918-Welterweight Part II

Jan 1919 WW Division Profile

Total: 93 RL: 48 TC: 45

RL by Career Stage:
End - 2
Post - 10
Prime - 22
Pre - 7
Beginning - 7 (4 New)

Rated: 36
800+: 7
500+: 21
200+: 34

Jan 1919 Rankings (Perf Pts and Changes from Jan 1918 in Parens):

Champ: Art Magirl 27-2-1 (24) (1366) (NC)
1. Packey McFarland 42-4-3 (22) (1217) (NC)
2. Albert Badoud 25-7-2 (15) (1111) (+4)
3. Eddie Shevlin 27-10-3 (12) (944) (+16)
4. Johnny Summers 42-24-4 (18) (910) (+9)
5. Johnny Basham 26-8-3 (11) (905) (-1)
6. Jack Britton 42-9-3 (16) (900) (-4)
7. Ted Kid Lewis 26-10-4 (11) (766) (+5)
8. Dixie Kid 52-20-2 (21) (758) (+3)
9. Johnny Alberts 27-10-5 (13) (745) (+6)
10. Dick Nelson 36-18-4 (22) (735) (-7)

Comments: Summers, Dixie Kid and Nelson at Post in 1919; others still at Prime. While the two top spots remained unchanged, everything else was topsy-turvy with half of the Top 10 list different from last year. Magirl's 16-bout win streak was snapped as he finally appeared vulnerable in the draw with Ted Kid Lewis. McFarland remains the top contender despite a loss to Badoud, as he won four other bouts, including UDs over Nelson and Holberg. Badoud defeated Kid and Graves in addition to McFarland, but could only manage a draw with Marty Cross. Shevlin made a huge move up the rankings by virtue of his split in two bouts with Britton; he also defeated Ted Kid Lewis on a DQ and KO'd Willie Loughlin. Summers went 4-0 to leapfrog back into the top group, scoring a UD over Holberg and a TKO over Irish vet Jimmy Gardner in addition to two title bout triumphs. Basham had a four-bout win streak snapped by the loss to Magirl, but he scored a UD 10 over Loughlin. Britton slipped as a result of his problems with Shevlin and the first loss to McFarland. Lewis snapped a six-bout losing streak with a UD 10 over Nelson, but the draw with Magirl was the highlight of his year. Dixie Kid lost to Badoud, but rallied with wins over Clabby and Barrieau. Alberts finished the year winning three in a row (TKO Whitney, SD Kay, UD Graves) after losing the USBA title shot. Nelson clung to the 10th spot despite dropping three UD losses in a row after a TKO of Holberg.

Other Notables: Five dropped out of the top group from last year, including Kid Graves, who dropped seven spots to #12, suffering UD defeats to Badoud and Alberts to extend his losing streak to four; Willie Loughlin, who slipped four spots to #13 with losses to Basham and Shevlin after a UD over Whitney, making it three losses in his last four; the aforementioned Whitney, who lost both outings in 1918 to fall from #7 to #15; Holberg, who slipped six spots to #16 by losing all three of his bouts in 1918. Finally, Jimmy Clabby dropped 9 spots to #17 , losing to Dixie Kid and Barrieau. Marty Cross has registed four wins and a draw in his last five bouts to move to #11, his wins included a SD over Jimmy Gardner and a DQ win over Ted Kid Lewis in addition to a draw with Badoud. Brit Bermondsey Billy Wells remained unbeaten at 16-0 (9), making him the top newcomer, debuting at #14, his wins featuring a KO over Belgian Piet Hobin and UDs over Tom McCormick and Arthur Evernden. Hobin rallied for four straight wins after the loss to Wells and debuts at #30 with a 12-3 (5) record.

Prospects: Most of these guys kept their slates clean versus TC competition. Ray Long is now 12-0 (6); George Levine is 9-0 (1); Joe Simonich started out at 5-0 (1). An exception is Dane Frithjof Hansen, who stumbled versus Hobin and now stands at 7-3 (0), but is 0-2 versus RL boxers. Jack Sparr at 4-0 (3), Macario Flores at 4-0 (1), and Georgie Ward at 2-0 (2) all got their careers off on the right foot.

Retirements: Four WWs hung up the gloves in 1918. Career stats:

Cy Flynn (USA) 1902-18 29-30-4 (15) No Titles Highest Rank: 14
Willie Schaeffer (USA) 1910-18 22-14-2 (15) No Titles Highest Rank: 7
Tommy Howell (USA) 1909-18 20-20-1 (5) No Titles Highest Rank: 23
Willie Lewis (USA) 1901-18 38-28-2 (19) NABF, USBA Titles Highest Rank: 2

Looking Ahead: Magirl seems vulnerable after the last title bout; McFarland and Badoud seem to be the logical challengers. Shevlin may also be looking to step up, and Britton seeks to recover after a down year. Ted Kid Lewis will seek to build on his recent good result with Magirl. Aged veterans like Kid, Nelson, and Summers seem likely to fade from view. It will be interesting to see if Bermondsey Billy Wells can build on his early success. Also, will guys like Graves, Loughlin, and Clabby rebound after poor years? Marty Cross may be ready to move into the Top 10. None of the prospects seem exceptionally talented, but newcomers Young Corbett III, Joe Dundee and Pete Latzo look to provide plenty of competition in the future.

Predictions: Pretty poor results here as well; had Magirl losing the WBA belt and Britton winning it -- wrong on both scores. Had Loughlin stepping up to a title belt -- instead he fell out of the top 10. Dick Nelson did not slip out of the top 10, but correctly forecast that Whitney would, and had Ted Kid Lewis moving back up the ladder.
For 1919, I will predict that Magirl will finally be stopped in a title bout. Look for Ted Kid Lewis or Badoud to hold the WBA belt at year's end. OK, here's a bold one ... Shevlin over McFarland for the NABF belt. And a switchout of at least four spots in the Top 10, one less than in 1918.
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Old 05-02-2007, 01:30 AM   #340
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1918-Junior Welterweight

Not much to report for this fledgling division. Pinkey Mitchell, the only RL fighter, finished his second year with a 7-0 (3) record, all versus TCs (mostly from the WW class). Mitchell is now at Pre-Prime, and he will be joined by two more JWWs in 1919: Basil Galiano and Spug Myers.
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