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Old 12-24-2016, 05:37 PM   #1241
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1939 - Lightweights

LW Title Bouts

WBA: Tony Canzoneri began the year with the title and defended once, defeating Pedro Montanez (UD 15). Then, Henry Armstrong successfully challenged Canzoneri (TKO 14) to capture the belt and remained WBA LW Champion at year-end.

NABF: Wesley Ramey carried this belt into 1939 and made one successful defense, versus Tony Chavez (D 12). Then, Al Roth defeated Ramey (MD 12) to take the belt. Finally, Lou Ambers challenged for the belt and dethroned Roth (UD 12).

USBA: Lou Ambers started the year with this title and defended it against challengers Sammy Fuller (UD 12) and Tony Chavez (TKO 11). Then, Ambers vacated the title after moving up to take the NABF belt. In a contest for the vacant belt, Lew Jenkins prevailed over Tommy Spiegel (UTD 6).

CBU: Jack Kid Berg retained the belt, making two successful defenses during the year, defeating Harry Mizler (UD 12) and Laurie Stevens (UD 12).

GBU: Harry Mizler keeps this title for another year, but made no defenses for the second year in a row (due to lack of credible challengers).

EBU: Jack Kid Berg kept this belt, making one successful defense, defeating Aldo Spoldi (UD 12).

OPBF: Not active in this division yet.

LABF: Pedro Montanez retained this belt for another year, making one successful defense versus Justo Suarez (UD 12).

LW Division Profile

Total: 140 RL: 86 TC: 54

RL by Career Stage:
End - 8
Post - 20
Prime - 29
Pre - 19
Beginning - 10 (7 New)

Rated: 60
800+: 21
500+: 42
200+ : 59

Jan 1940 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1939 in Parens):

Champ: Henry Armstrong 31-3-3 (25) (1799) (new)
1. Tony Canzoneri 49-5-4 (17) (1783) (-1)
2. Lou Ambers 31-2-1 (18) (1344) (+1) (NABF)
3. Jack Kid Berg 42-14-5 (14) (1340) (+1) (EBU, CBU)
4. Pedro Montanez 33-7 (16) (1317) (+3) (LABF)
5. Al Roth 33-7-1 (11) (1145) (+6)
6. Tony Chavez 27-8-2 (11) (1137) (+3)
7. Wesley Ramey 30-10-6 (10) (1124) (-4)
8. Chino Alvarez 34-11-4 (22) (1107) (+8)
9. Sammy Fuller 48-16-1 (11) (1082) (-7)
10. Cecil Payne 41-14-4 (9) (1022) (-2)

Others: 13. Lew Jenkins 21-0-2 (11) (976) (+7) (USBA)
38. Harry Mizler 20-11-4 (5) (527) (-5) (GBU)

Comments: All the above at Prime except for Canzoneri, Montanez, Fuller and Payne, who enter 1940 at Post-Prime career stage. Henry Armstrong had a stellar year, winning WBA titles in two divisions (WW and LW) and, as noted, he was held to a draw at WW by Cocoa Kid. Canzoneri recovered from his title loss to Armstrong to record a UD win over Fuller, going 2-1 for the year. Ambers stepped up to claim the NABF title but also suffered his second career loss, via MD, to Montanez; his three title bout wins plus a MD over Laurie Stevens were sufficient to maintain the #2 spot in the rankings. Berg went 4-0 for the year, taking three title bouts and a UD over Ramey. Montanez suffered the WBA title loss, but rebounded with three wins, including the MD over Ambers and a UD against Frankie Klick. Roth won and lost the USBA title, then registered a trio of UD wins versus Payne, Benny Bass and long-time JLW Champion Tod Morgan to go 4-1 for the year; a concomitant rise in the rankings was his reward. Chavez managed wins over Klick and Payne but struggled in title bouts, drawing one and losing the other. Ramey had a draw and a loss in title bouts, a UD win over Alvarez but then lost to Berg. Alvarez had a busy 1939, with TKO wins over Loayza, Fuller and Klick but lost to Ramey and was held to a draw by Emory Cabana. Fuller was also active in five bouts during the year, but lost three of them, causing a precipitous drop in the rankings as his two wins (both by UD) came against lower-rated guys (Castilloux and Loayza). Payne managed to hang on to a top 10 spot by virtue of a DQ win over Benny Bass; he lost his two other 1939 outings (both UD losses to Roth and Chavez). Just missing on the top 10 was Laurie Stevens, who finished up at #11 after going 3-2 for the year. Jenkins maintained his unbeaten status despite a second career draw, this versus Lefty Satan Flynn and scored impressive wins over Roger Bernard and Lew Kirsch (both via UD) to set up his successful bid for the vacant USBA title. Davey Day rode a four-bout winning streak to the #15 spot, including a UD win over the hapless Bass. Bass dropped all the way from #6 to #16 after a miserable year in which he lost all three of his bouts. Italy’s Aldo Spoldi slid seven spots to #17, going 2-2 for the year, with UD wins over Mizler and Hirsch Demsitz to his credit, but there was also a TKO loss to Bernard as well as the EBU title loss. Mizler lost ground in the rankings after a poor year in which he won just once (a UD 10 over Billy Townsend) in four outings. Top newcomer to the list at #40 is George Latka, who reeled off 14 straight wins before dropping a split duke to Luther White in his last outing; Latka, who impressed with a stoppage of Canadian Billy Marquart and a UD over Brit Eric Boon, ended the year at 14-1 (9). Also new to the rankings this year is Jimmy Tygh, whose only career loss was to Latka in 1938 but in 1939 he reeled off four straight wins, including a UD over Lenny Mancini, to end up at 13-1-1 (9), good for the #42 spot.

Prospects: Willie Joyce checks in at 12-1 (9); he suffered his first career loss (a UD to Julie Kogon) but did record a win over Maxie Shapiro (also a UD). Larry Cisneros remains unbeaten, at 12-0 (9), with a win over Pete Nebo in addition to a string of TC wins. Al “Bummy” Davis ended the year at 10-2 (8) after dropping a MD to Tygh (his second career loss). Shapiro, now 10-1-1 (6), had his record marred by the loss to Joyce and a draw with Lenny “Boom Boom” Mancini. Mancini suffered his first career loss, to Tygh, and ended up at 9-1-2 (5). Still perfect are Julie Kogon, 11-0 (5); Allie Stolz, 10-0 (8); and Bob Montgomery, 9-0 (9). Beau Jack got off to a good start with two stoppage wins to build a 2-0 (2) record thus far.

Retirements: Ten retirements from the LW ranks in 1939; three of these were also active in the now defunct JLW division (including one former WBA Champion there).

Harry Mason (UK) 1920-39 37-31-5 (5) EBU, CBU, GBU Champ Highest Rank: 17
George Rose (UK) 1926-39 26-21-3 (7) No Titles Highest Rank: 41
Francois Sybille (BEL) 1924-39 30-28-3 (11) No Titles Highest Rank: 28
Leslie Wildcat Carter (USA) 1925-39 38-21-4 (12) No Titles Highest Rank: 3 (as JLW)
Tod Morgan (USA) 1920-39 50-21-5 (13) WBA JLW Champ 2927-28, 1931-34 NABF LW Champ Highest Rank (as LW): 5
Pete Nebo (USA) 1925-39 25-23-2 (14) No Titles Highest Rank: 2 (as JLW)
Billy Townsend (CAN) 1926-39 28-23-1 (16) NABF, CBU Champ Highest Rank: 5
Baby Sal Sorio (USA) 1925-39 32-21-1 (18) No Titles Highest Rank: 19
Justo Suarez (ARG) 1928-39 30-17-1 (17) No Titles Highest Rank: 4
Harry Dublinsky (USA) 1926-39 31-19-3 (10) No Titles Highest Rank: 18

Looking Ahead: Armstrong is expected to vacate the LW title soon, leaving Ambers and Berg as the top contenders for the vacant belt, given that Canzoneri is already on the downside of his very impressive career that included a seven-year reign as WBA LW Champion. It remains to be seen how much longer Jenkins can remain unbeaten; while he has managed to win a lesser title, he has not faced much in the way of tough competition yet. This is an aging group; there are almost as many fighters at Post and End career stage as there are at Prime. Right now, Willie Joyce and Bob Montgomery are the best of the many prospects, and Ike Williams and Aussie Vic Patrick top the incoming class of 1940 debutants.

Last edited by JCWeb; 12-28-2016 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 12-25-2016, 12:04 PM   #1242
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1939 - Featherweights

FW Title Bouts

WBA: Chalky Wright emerged as a new Champion, dethroning Simon Chavez (UD 15) to capture the belt. Wright then defended three times, turning aside challenges from Kid Chocolate (SD 15), Baby Arizmendi (DQ 5) and Frankie Covelli (UD 15).

NABF: Freddie Miller began the year with this belt, but he lost it to Baby Arizmendi (MD 12). Arizmendi defending once, beating Battling Battalino (UD 12).

USBA: Chalky Wright began 1939 with this title but vacated it after winning the WBA title. IN a matchup for the vacant belt, Jimmy Perrin bested Petey Sarron (UD 12). Then, Everett Rightmire ousted Perrin (UD 12) to end the year with this title.

CBU: Pete DeGrasse started 1939 with this title and defended it once, beating Dave Crowley (UD 12). Then, Frank Parkes took the title from DeGrasse (DQ 10). In a rematch, DeGrasse regained the belt from Parkes (UD 12).

GBU: No title bouts as Frank Parkes keeps this belt for another year.

EBU: This title changed hands twice during 1939. Ginger Foran successfully challenged, dethroning holder Maurice Holtzer (UD 12). Then, Frank Parkes defeated Foran (UD 12) to capture the belt, holding it into 1940.

OPBF: Tsuneo Horiguchi continued as the holder of this belt, making one successful defense, versus Merv Blandon (TKO 11).

LABF: This title changed hands twice in three title bouts during 1939. First, Filio Julian Echevarria took the title from Enrique Chafferdet (UD 12). Then, Kid Chocolate dethroned Echevarria (UD 12), and later in the year Chocolate turned back a challenge from Chafferdet (UD 12).

FW Division Profile

Total: 112 RL: 68 TC: 44

RL by Career Stage:
End - 4
Post - 15
Prime - 28
Pre - 12
Beginning - 9 (6 New)

Rated: 51
800+: 16
500+: 32
200+ : 50

Jan 1940 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1939 in Parens):

Champ: Chalky Wright 34-10-4 (14) (1235) (+5)
1. Baby Arizmendi 39-9-2 (10) (1181) (+1) (NABF)
2. Kid Chocolate 38-8-7 (16) (1178) (-1) (LABF)
3. Freddie Miller 37-11-1 (15) (1127) (+1)
4. Filio Julian Echevarria 35-13-4 (12) (1032) (+6)
5. Battling Battalino 40-13-2 (14) (1023) (+1)
6. Frankie Covelli 31-11-8 (7) (1000) (+2)
7. Mike Belloise 25-8-5 (9) (969) (+9)
8. Harold Hoshino 22-0 (14) (956) (+7)
9. Pete DeGrasse 38-16-4 (10) (908) (-2) (CBU)
10. Maurice Holtzer 41-17-3 (15) (841) (-7)

Others: 14. Frank Parkes 22-4 (14) (801) (+4) (EBU, GBU)
15. Tsuneo Horiguchi 24-7 (15) (800) (-1) (OPBF)
16. Everett Rightmire 28-7-3 (13) (793) (-4) (USBA)

Comments: Kid Chocolate, Miller, Echevarria, Battalino, Covelli and Holtzer will all be at Post-Prime coming into 1940; others still at Prime. Wright had a stellar 1940 campaign, winning all four of his title bout outings to end the year as WBA Champion. Arizmendi registered three wins and had the unfortunate DQ loss in the WBA title bout; he remains the top contender at this point. Chocolate went 2-1 for the year, all in title bouts. Miller bounced back from loss of the NABF title with a pair of impressive UD wins over DeGrasse and Horiguchi. Echevarria had an active 1939, contesting five bouts and winning four. He managed to scrape through a SD 10 over Belloise and also posted solid UD wins versus Tony Dupre and ex-Champ Chavez. Battalino had a win, a loss and two draws in his 1939 outings; the draws were with Belloise and DeGrasse, and the only win was a TKO over Petey Sarron. Covelli fell back after the WBA title loss; he had reeled off three straight wins (a SD over Rightmire and UD 10s versus lesser guys like Hansford and Varner) to set up the title shot. Belloise was 4-1-1 in six 1939 outings, moving swiftly up the ranks after a UD 10 win over ex-Champ Chavez (the whipping boy in the division this year); his only loss was a SD to Echevarria. Hoshino remained unbeaten with three more wins, notably two good recent results, a pair of UD wins versus Chafferdet and then Horiguchi in his most recent outing. DeGrasse was 2-1 in CBU title bouts but slipped after dropping a UD to Miller. Holtzer was 1-2 for the year, dropping the EBU title and suffering a UD loss to Sarron; his only win came at the expense of an aging Chick Suggs. Sarron just missed the top 10, ending the year at #11 after a TKO loss to Battalino following a USBA title loss. Chafferdet dropped out of the top 10, down three spots to #12, going through a dismal 1-3 campaign; his only win was a SD over the aforementioned Chavez. For Chavez, it was a huge drop from the title all the way to #13; he lost all four of his bouts during the year. Parkes was 2-1 in title bouts after dropping a UD to Horiguchi early in the year. Horiguchi was headed for a top 10 ranking until he was derailed by two straight losses, both via UD, to Miller and Hoshino. Rightmire recovered from a poor start (losing to a UD 10 to Leo Rodak) with a KO over Petey Hayes, followed by the USBA title win. Rodak won all four of his 1939 outings to advance to a year-end #18 position. Top newcomers to the rankings list this year: Eddie Miller, whose 4-0 1939 campaign included UD wins over Willie Smith and Phil Zwick, putting him at #21, with a 15-1 (7) career start; Petey Scalzo, the only man to defeat Miller who ended up #23, at 16-2 (11), after a KO loss to Al Reid ; and, further down the list, at #35, is Sal Bartolo, 14-1 (6), who suffered his first career setback (a MD loss to Zwick) after compiling a perfect record, albeit largely versus TC competition.

Prospects: Albert Mancini took a SD over Jackie Callura but suffered his first career loss (a MD to Irving Eldredge) to end the year at 13-1 (7). Still unbeaten is Cuba’s National Kid, now 12-0 (7) after another solid year that featured a UD win over aging veteran Dom Volante. Bobby Ivy struggled once past the TC opposition, dropping a UD to Harold Lacey to end the year at 11-1 (8). Richie Lemos, now 10-1 (5), had his first loss (a MD) coming at the hands of Bartolo; Joe Marinelli, also 10-1 (5), also lost to his first non-TC opponent, Mancini (a UD result). Puerto Rico’s Pedro Hernandez maintained a clean slate versus TC opposition to end the year at 9-0 (2); so did Joey Iannotti, now 7-0 (6). Brit Al Phillips is off to an excellent 5-0 (3) start to his career.

Retirements: Four retirements from the FW ranks in 1939, including one former WBA Champion.

Merv Blandon (AUS) 1931-39 22-14 (15) CBU, OPBF Champ Highest Rank: 23
Dom Volante (UK) 1923-39 35-24-2 (21) EBU, CBU, GBU Champ Highest Rank: 3
Nel Tarleton (UK) 1926-39 30-18-5 (12) CBU, GBU Champ Highest Rank: 19
Chick Suggs (USA) 1918-39 48-26-10 (13) WBA Champion 1923-24, 1926-27, 1930-31

Looking Ahead: Frankly, there’s not a lot of great talent in the FW division, which is why the revolving doors at the top for the WBA title and other major belts. Right now, Chalky Wright is on top but his reign is tenuous, although many of the top remaining challengers are going to be fading due to the impact of aging. Baby Arizmendi is probably the most likely to successfully challenge, and the as-yet-to-be-tested-but still undefeated Harold Hoshino is still an unknown quantity. Petey Scalzo, still fairly far down the ranks, may contend once he hits Prime. None of the current crop of prospects appear to be poised to become strong contenders, but among the six newcomers is Willie Pep, certainly one to be watched for the future.

Last edited by JCWeb; 12-26-2016 at 04:48 PM.
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Old 12-26-2016, 02:32 PM   #1243
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1939 - Bantamweights

BW Title Bouts

WBA: Johnny King began the year with the title, defending versus Little Pancho (MD 15). Then, Panama Al Brown successfully challenged for the title, dethroning King (TKO 13). Brown made two more defenses during the year, beating Pablo Dano (TKO 13) and Sixto Escobar (UD 15).

NABF: Panama Al Brown relinquished the NABF title after winning the WBA belt. In a match for the vacant title, K. O. Morgan defeated Lou Salica (UD 12).

USBA: K. O. Morgan started 1939 with this title and defended once, versus Pete Sanstol (DQ 8). Then, Morgan vacated the title after moving up to capture the NABF crown. The vacant belt then went to Georgie Pace, who defeated Sanstol (TKO 10).

CBU: No 1939 title bouts for this belt, which stayed with Horace Gwynne.

GBU: Tom Smith retained this belt, beating Benny Sharkey (SD 12). In a rematch, Sharkey prevailed over Smith (UD 12) to capture the title.

EBU: Baltazar Sangchili retained this belt, turning aside a challenge from Istvan Enekes (TKO 5).

OPBF: Little Pancho continued as the holder of this belt, making one successful defense, versus Chris Pineda (UD 12).

LABF: Panama Al Brown relinquished this belt after winning the WBA title. A rematch for the vacant belt between Sixto Escobar and Humberto Espinosa ended in a draw (D 12). Later in the year, Escobar won the title in another matchup for the vacant belt, defeating Raul Casanova (UD 12).

BW Division Profile

Total: 85 RL: 48 TC: 37

RL by Career Stage:
End - 5
Post - 10
Prime - 21
Pre - 8
Beginning - 4 (1 New)

Rated: 38
800+: 17
500+: 28
200+ : 36

Jan 1940 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1939 in Parens):

Champ: Panama Al Brown 62-10-1 (22) (1797) (+1)
1. Johnny King 46-6-1 (18) (1541) (-1)
2. Sixto Escobar 31-7-3 (10) (1291) (+1) (LABF)
3. K. O. Morgan 31-11-5 (17) (1258) (+7) (NABF)
4. Little Pancho 36-9-5 (9) (1194) (NC) (OPBF)
5. Pablo Dano 36-12-5 (16) (1145) (+1)
6. Georgie Pace 23-7-1 (17) (1043) (+7) (USBA)
7. Pete Sanstol 38-12-5 (9) (1042) (-5)
8. Mickey Miller 25-7-2 (16) (944) (+14)
9. Speedy Dado 37-19-2 (14) (943) (-4)
10. Raul Casanova 25-7-1 (14) (887) (-2)

Others: 11. Baltazar Sangchili 34-12 (19) (865) (NC) (EBU)
13. Benny Sharkey 34-14-2 (19) (843) (-4) (GBU)
14. Horace Gwynne 24-7-1 (14) (832) (-7) (CBU)

Comments: Panama Al Brown hits Post-Prime in 1940; he, Escobar, Dado, Sangchili, Sharkey and Gwynne will all be at Post while everyone else listed is still at Prime. Brown regained the title and went 4-0 for the year, starting with a UD over Dado before the three winning efforts in title bouts. King did not fight after the loss to Brown, thus was 1-1 for the year but still retains the top contender spot. Escobar had an active year, with his only loss coming to Brown for the WBA title; he was held to a draw by Sanstol but recorded a non-title MD win over Sangchili to maintain a high spot in the rankings. Morgan won all three of his 1939 bouts, adding a TKO over Sangchili in addition to two title bout wins. Pancho recovered from an early year UD loss to Sanstol with a pair of UD wins over Gwynne and Tom Smith in addition to the successful OPBF title defense. Dano reeled off three straight wins (UDs versus Tommy and Gwynne, plus a TKO over Casanova) to set up the losing title effort versus Brown. Pace moved into the top 10 after a 3-1 campaign, mainly based on a TKO of Sanstol’ other wins came over lower-ranked guys (Humery and Green) after an early-year loss to Salica. Sanstol was 2-2 for the year, dropping ranking spots after two unsuccessful title trys; the wins came over Dado (MD) and Pancho (UD) in non-title action. Mickey Miller zoomed up the rankings list after a big win (via TKO) over Dado; he also recorded wins over Espinosa and Ritchie Tanner (also via stoppages) as part of a 1939 campaign that racked up four wins and a technical draw in five bouts. Dado dropped down the list after going 2-3 for the year; two wins came over Gwynne (UD) and Salica (SD). Casanova rounds out the top 10; he managed a UD over Farber but losses to Dano and Escobar (for the LABF title) did not help. Sangchili just missed the top 10 for the second year in a row; he retained his EBU title but two non-title losses to Escobar (MD) and Morgan (TKO) left him at 2-2 for the year. Sharkey and Gwynne both retained titles but dropped out of the top 10; Sharkey was hurt by his one loss to lowly-rated Tom Smith, while Gwynne went 0-3 for the year and is now mired in a four-bout losing streak. Topping the newcomers to the list, checking in at #12, is Tommy Forte, who won his first 19 bouts before being held to a draw by Lou Salica to end the year at 19-0-1 (10); his 1939 victims included Tanner (DQ win), Hermann Remscheid (TKO), Farber (UD), Green (UD) and fellow prospect Tony Olivera (SD). Further down the list, Henry Hook fashioned a four-bout winning streak to move up to #19. KO artist David Kui Kong Yong, winner of 13 of his first 14 inside the distance, struggled in recent outings, dropping a split decision to Star Frisco and only managing a draw with Bobby Green; he ends the year at 14-1-1 (13), good for #25 spot. Finally, the aforementioned Tony Olivera checks in at #32, off to a 14-3-1 (13) career start, after an active year, contesting six bouts, with three wins but suffering losses to Forte (SD) and journeyman Tony Marino (TKO) and also being held to a draw with Jo Teiken.

Prospects: Benny Goldberg recorded UD wins over Huerta Evans and Remscheid, but dropped a tech decision to Hook, leaving him at 12-1 (10) heading into 1940. Manuel Ortiz maintained a clean slate, improving to 10-0 (9), albeit it all against TC opposition. Also feasting on TC opposition to retain perfect career marks were Frenchman Theo Medina, now 7-0 (4); American Freddy Pope, also 7-0 (4); Belgian Joe Cornelis, 6-0 (3). Getting off to good starts were Lorenzo Safora, 4-0 (2); Luis Castillo, 3-0 (2); and Norman Lewis, 1-0 (1).

Retirements: Only two BWs left the ranks in 1939, one of whom was a WBA Champ.

Kid Francis (ITA) 1923-39 34-25-5 (20) WBA Champion 1930-31, 1933-34
Huerta Evans (USA) 1927-39 28-24-1 (9) No Titles Highest Rank: 17

Looking Ahead: Only a few minor changes near the top, notably Panama Al Brown regaining the WBA title and a couple of guys new to the top ten (Georgie Pace and Mickey Miller). Aging effects begin to kick in for some of the top guys, notably Panama Al (who turns 38 in 1940) and LABF Champ Escobar. Thus, this title reign for Brown may not be a long one, it could depend on how much he is able to hand-pick his opposition. K. O. Morgan, coming off a very successful 1939 campaign, is among those itching (and deserving) a WBA title shot. It will be interesting to see if guys like Georgie Pace, Mickey Miller and Tommy Forte, all of whom are coming off big years in which they zoomed up the rankings, will fare once facing some stiffer opposition. Manuel Ortiz and Benny Goldberg appear to be the best of the young prospects right now, with only one new addition (Canadian Kenny Lindsay) slated to join the BW ranks in 1940).

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Old 12-28-2016, 12:05 PM   #1244
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1939 - Flyweights

FLY Title Bouts

WBA: Three more successful title defenses from Midget Wolgast, who turned away challenges from Valentin Angelmann (UD 15), Frankie Genaro (DQ 9) and Benny Lynch (UD 15).

NABF: Frankie Genaro retained this belt for another year, despite making no defenses during 1939.

USBA: After no title action in over two years, this title changed hands as challenger Jackie Jurich dethroned Ruby Bradley (TKO 9).

CBU: Two title bouts produced one new Champion. Johnny Gill defended successfully versus Peter Kane (UD 12). Then, Benny Lynch defeated Gill (UD 12) to capture the belt.

GBU: No title action; Jackie Brown remains the titleholder for another year.

EBU: Jackie Brown took the title from Istvan Enekes (MD 12) and then made two successful defenses, against Enrico Urbinati (UD 12) and Fortunato Ortega (UD 12).

OPBF: Dormant for over four years, title action was revived in 1939 as Small Montana defended successfully, beating Yoichiro Hanada (MD 12).

LABF: Inactive for this division.

FLY Division Profile

Total: 61 RL: 35 TC: 26

RL by Career Stage:
End - 3
Post - 5
Prime - 19
Pre - 6
Beginning - 2 (1 New)

Rated: 29
800+: 6
500+: 16
200+ : 25

Jan 1940 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1939 in Parens):

Champ: Midget Wolgast 50-5-1 (18) (1659) (NC)
1. Jackie Brown 37-14-4 (12) (930) (+2) (EBU, GBU)
2. Benny Lynch 31-8 (16) (908) (+2) (CBU)
3. Little Dado 19-0 (11) (823) (new)
4. Frankie Genaro 51-21-6 (19) (822) (-3) (NABF)
5. Valentin Angelmann 34-18-1 (12) (806) (+4)
6. Jimmy Gill 25-6-3 (10) (749) (NC)
7. Peter Kane 20-2 (10) (731) (+1)
8. Eugene Huat 31-18-7 (14) (722) (+4)
9. Istvan Enekes 32-9-1 (10) (711) (-7)
10. Ernst Weiss 23-6-1 (18) (674) (-5)

Others: 11. Small Montana 23-10-3 (8) (659) (-1) (OPBF)
14. Jackie Jurich 17-3-1 (13) (556) (+2) (USBA)

Comments: Lots of variation in the relative experience of those listed above, ranging from Genaro (now at End career stage) to Little Dado (who has one more bout at Pre-Prime); all the rest are at Prime except for Wolgast and Lynch (at Post heading into 1940). Wolgast extended his title reign (which dates back nine years to 1931) with three more successful title defenses in 1939. Brown secured the top contender spot with three wins and a draw during the year and now boasts a six-bout unbeaten streak; the draw came against Jurich after three title bout wins. Lynch moved up by virtue of a UD over a fading Genaro; he split his other two bouts, both of which were for titles. Little Dado reeled off five more wins to become one of the highest debutants in a decade, by virtue of a UD over an aging Genaro, topping off a stellar 1939 campaign that also boasted wins over Jurich (UD), Pladner (UD) and Hanada (MD). Genaro managed a UD over Weiss but then three straight losses (to Lynch and Dado,after the DQ in the WBA title match) spelled a slide down the rankings. Angelmann moved up after fashioning a five-bout winning streak, including a trio of MD wins over Huat, Bostock and Enekes. Gill had only two outings during the year, going 1-1 in title bouts to retain his top 10 status. Kane dropped the title bout with Gill but recovered well with wins over Weiss (UD) and Bostock (MD). Huat went 3-1, losing to his countryman, Angelmann, but registering TKOs over Kid David and Rinty Monaghan in addition to a UD over Belgian prospect DeGryse. Enekes had a dismal year, going 0-3 to fall out of the top five but remains in the top ten. Weiss also retained a top 10 spot despite losses to Genaro and Kane. Just missing the top group was Montana, who retained his OPBG title but suffered a pair of MD losses to the Spaniard, Fortunato Ortega. Ortega ended up the year one spot lower, at #12, due to an EBU title loss to Brown. Jurich captured the USBA title in the midst of a three-bout winning streak, wrapping up the year with a draw with Brown, but then suffered the UD loss to Dado. Ruby Bradley faded nine spots all the way to #16 after losing the USBA title. In addition to Dado, the only other newcomer to crack the rankings is Raoul DeGryse, who checks in at 15-3 (10), good for the #20 spot; he racked up 15 straight wins before struggling with recent setbacks, losing to Huat (UD), fellow prospect Hans Schiffers (MD) and Young Perez (UD).

Prospects: Italy’s Gavino Matta is now 10-1-1 (5), suffering his first loss (a TKO) to DeGryse. Hans Schiffers took a MD from DeGryse to reverse an earlier DQ loss, leaving him at 10-1 (6) at year’s end. A pair of Brits, Jackie Paterson (7-0, 7 KO) and Teddy Gardner (7-0, 5 KO), are off to excellent career starts.

Retirements: Two Flyweights retired in 1939, including one former WBA Champ.

Newsboy Brown (USA) 1922-39 44-24-3 (22) WBA Champion 1925, 1930-31
Pinky Silverberg (USA) 1920-39 41-33-8 (11) NABF Champ Highest Rank: 2

Looking Ahead: Wolgast’s huge gap of over 700 perf pts over his closest challenger is likely to be erased soon, given the fact the long-time Champ has hit Post-Prime. Jackie Brown is itching for a title shot, and fast-rising Filipino sensation Little Dado, appears to be ready to challenge for the OPBF title and perhaps a WBA title shot once he hits Prime after his next bout. A changing of the guard with guys like Wolgast, Genaro and Bradley fading or beginning to fade from the scene, and even Benny Lynch (who appears to be headed for a short career) is unlikely to remain a top contender for long. Peter Kane appears poised to make further advances, and it will be interesting to see if Enekes – who has several more years at Prime left – can rebound from a disasterous 1939 season. British flyweights will continue to pack the ranks of contenders with prospects like Gardner and Paterson waiting in the wings. But don’t expect much from the one newcomer slated to join the ranks, Italian Otello Belardinelli, as he’s only rated a “2.”
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Old 12-30-2016, 02:25 PM   #1245
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1939 Pound-For-Pound Rankings and Year-End Awards

Finally, it's time for the year-end PFP (pound-for-pound) rankings and awards.

1939 YEAR-END PFP RANKINGS

(Perf Pts and changes from prior year in parenthesis)

1. Henry Armstrong, WBA LW and WW Champ (1799) (new)
2. Panama Al Brown, WBA BW Champ (1797) (+1)
3. Joe Louis, WBA HW Champ (1786) (+2)
4. Tony Canzoneri, LW (1783) (-3)
5. Freddie Steele, WBA MW Champ (1684) (+4)
6. Midget Wolgast, WBA BW Champ (1659) (NC)
7. Max Schmeling, EBU HW Champ (1625) (-3)
8. Cocoa Kid, LABF WW Champ (1590) (+2)
9. Johnny King, BW (1541) (-1)
10. Eddie Dolan, WW (1477) (new)

Dropped out: Maxie Rosenbloom, LH (was #2)
Jimmy McLarnin, WW (was #7)

1939 YEAR-END AWARDS

Fighter of the Year: Henry Armstrong
Fight of the Year: Max Baer UD 10 Elmer Ray
Newcomer of the Year: Little Dado
Upset of the Year: Nathan Mann SD 12 Abe Simon (NABF HW title)

Comments: Canzoneri makes the list for the eighth straight year; Armstrong tops the list after just missing the top 10 last year. Panama Al, who first made the list back in 1928, is listed for the fifth time, making him the senior member of the group. Three of the top 10 PFP list (Brown, Canzoneri and Wolgast will be at Post-Prime for 1940.

As for the year-end awards, it is hard to deny Armstrong who took WBA titles in two different divisions. Brown, Louis and Steele were other strong candidates. There were some very competitive title bouts, but none was more interesting than the Baer-Ray confrontation which saw both men tasting the canvas in the later rounds. Little Dado, who remained unbeaten to debut at #3 among the Flyweight contenders, is the top newcomer; a strong runner-up for the reward is Harold Hoshino, another unbeaten fighter who also reached the top 10, #8 in the FW division. Finally, there were some surprising WBA title bout results, but those were mainly achieved via controversial DQ endings, so in my mind a bout like the Mann-Simon bout where the unheralded challenger actually outfought a favored opponent seemed more serving of the term "upset."
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:26 AM   #1246
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Roll of Champions as of January 1, 1940

With a new year (indeed, a new decade) of fistic action about to commence, here's a look at the situation as regards current titleholders.

ROLL OF CHAMPIONS

HW

WBA: Joe Louis (Feb. 1939) (3)
NABF: Roscoe Toles (Dec. 1939) (0)
USBA: Jersey Joe Walcott (Sep. 1938) (3)
CBU: Tommy Matin (Dec. 1939) (0)
GBU: Tommy Martin (Aug. 1937) (1)
EBU: Max Schmeling (Sep. 1939) (0)
OPBF: Vacant
LABF: Jimmy Mendes (Nov. 1937) (1)


LH

WBA: Adolf Heuser (Dec. 1939) (0)

NABF: Tony Shucco (Oct. 1939) (0)
USBA: Eddie Booker (Jul. 1939) (0)
CBU: Charley Belanger (Aug. 1937) (0)
GBU: Bert Gilroy (Nov. 1939) (0)
EBU: Vacant

MW

WBA: Freddie Steele (Feb. 1938) (4)
NABF: Tony Zale (May 1938) (4)
USBA: Johnny Romero (Jan. 1938) (3)
CBU: Lou Brouillard (Nov. 1939) (0)
GBU: Jock McAvoy (Oct. 1930) (8)
EBU: Marcel Cerdan (Aug. 1938) (2)
OPBF: Fred Henneberry (Dec. 1939) (0)
LABF: Kid Tunero (Jan. 1938) (1)

WW

WBA: Henry Armstrong (Dec. 1939) (0)
NABF: Cocoa Kid (Mar. 1939) (2)
USBA: Jimmy Garrison (Oct. 1939) (0)
CBU: Ernie Roderick (Dec. 1938) (2)
GBU: Ernie Roderick (May 1935) (1)
EBU: Bep Van Klaveren (Feb. 1938) (5)
OPBF: Jack McNamee (Feb. 1939) (1)
LABF: Joe Legon (Jan. 1939) (1)

LW

WBA: Henry Armstrong (May 1939) (0)

NABF: Lou Ambers (Nov. 1939) (0)
USBA: Lew Jenkins (Dec. 1939) (0)
CBU: Jack Kid Berg (Jun. 1938) (3)
GBU: Harry Mizler (Feb. 1937) (1)
EBU: Jack Kid Berg (Jan. 1937) (3)
LABF: Pedro Montanez (Dec. 1938) (1)

FW

WBA: Chalky Wright (Jan. 1939) (3)
NABF: Baby Arizmendi (May 1939) (1)
USBA: Everett Rightmire (Nov. 1939) (0)
CBU: Pete DeGrasse (Nov. 1939) (0)
GBU: Frank Parkes (Sep. 1938) (0)
EBU: Frank Parkes (Jun. 1939) (0)
OPBF: Tsuneo Horiguchi (Jul. 1937) (2)
LABF: Kid Chocolate (Jun. 1939) (1)


BW

WBA: Panama Al Brown (Jun. 1939) (2)

NABF: K. O. Morgan (Aug. 1939) (0)
USBA: Georgie Pace (Oct. 1939) (0)
CBU: Horace Gwynne (Apr. 1936) (3)
GBU: Benny Sharkey (Dec. 1939) (0)
EBU: Baltazar Sangchili (Jun. 1937) (4)
OPBF: Little Pancho (Apr. 1937) (5)
LABF: Sixto Escobar (Oct. 1939) (0)

FLY

WBA: Midget Wolgast (May 1931) (23)
NABF: Frankie Genaro (Dec. 1934) (3)
USBA: Jackie Jurich (Aug. 1939) (0)
CBU: Benny Lynch (Jul. 1939) (0)
GBU: Jackie Brown (Dec. 1938) (0)
EBU: Jackie Brown (Mar. 1939) (2)
OPBF: Small Montana (Jan. 1935) (2)

Comments: Wolgast, now at Post-Prime, is the longest reigning WBA titleholder in any division, although Jock McAvoy is approaching his tenth anniversary as GBU MW Champion, he has had nowhere near as many title defenses as Wolgast. Still, a high degree of churn, as over half the titles changed hands during 1939.
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Old 01-11-2017, 01:20 PM   #1247
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Actually, the new decade will begin in 1941.

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Old 01-15-2017, 09:47 AM   #1248
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Jan. 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of January 1940, encompassing a total of 53 bouts, including one WBA title bout.

Jan. 4, 1940: The year commences with a Friday night card at Buffalo. Only one bout of note, which is the main event, a non-title affair matching two top 10 MWs: ex-WBA Champ Holman Williams and Freddie Apostoli, the “Boxing Bellhop.” First meeting of the two. In round three, Apostoli sustains a cut under his left eye. Early edge to Williams, but in round five Apostoli surprises the ex-Champ with a big shot that puts Williams on the deck for a five-count. Unofficial card has Apostoli ahead (49-46) at the midway point. Williams, who must now deal with a rapidly swelling left eye, begins to dig in and dominate the action as the bout heads into the later rounds. Apostoli, on the other hand, is unable to repeat in his success in round five. End result is a MD 10 for Williams (96-94, 95-95, 96-94) who takes the final four rounds on all three cards to overcome the early KD by Apostoli. Post- bout career records: Williams, 30-6 (19); Apostoli, 22-5-1 (19).

Jan. 5, 1940: Solid card at the Amor Bahn in Munich, featuring both German and Italian fighters. In the co-feature, two veteran MWs square off in a non-title bout, as German Hein Domgorgen faces Frenchman Edouard Tenet. Fifth meeting of these two familiar foes; prior results stand even at two wins apiece. This time, Tenet proves to be the better boxer but Domgorgen is more aggressive. Points edge to Tenet (49-47) at the midway point, according to the unofficial scorer, and he manages to stave off a late surge from the German to take a MD 10 (97-93, 95-95, 96-94) to run his career stats to 41-22-8 (9). The loss drops Domgorgen to 44-21-1 (22). The feature, for the EBU WW title belt, again matches two familiar foes as Bep Van Klaveren, now making his sixth defense of that title, faces Gustav Eder; their prior matchups show two wins recorded for each fighter. Eder sustains a cut over his left eye (due to an accidental butt) in round six; the unofficial card shows the German with a slim lead (58-57) at the midway point. A solid boxing exhibition from Eder continues to build on this early success, forcing Van Klaveren to step up the pace in the later rounds. The cut becomes worse and leads to a late stoppage, but the fact that it was caused by an accidental butt means reference to the scorecards, and Eder takes a UTD 11 (96-92, 95-94, 95-93) to capture the EBU after five previously unsuccessful tires (two versus Van Klaveren, three versus Cleto Locatelli). Post-bout career marks: Eder, 34-8-9 (9); Van Klaveren, 29-12-7 (11).

Jan. 5, 1940: Next fistic action is back in the States at Miami Stadium. A non-title contest tops the card, featuring former WBA LH Champ John Henry Lewis, still on the comeback trail, facing veteran and long-time LH contender Fred Lenhart. The bout is a rematch of sorts of a 1939 encounter that resulted in a DQ win for Lewis. This time around, with both men at Post-Prime career stage, Lenhart gets off to a solid start but Lewis is able to hold his own, particularly during some sharp exchanges with both men working on the inside in round five. The unofficial card has it even (48-all) at the midway point. From round six onward, Lewis begins to gain the upper hand in terms of the punches landed stats. Lenhart, trailing, becomes more aggressive in the later rounds, but in round nine he gets into trouble and walks into a Lewis cross that sends him to the canvas. Lenhart arises after taking a four count, but he winds up with a rapidly swelling left eye that bothers him for the remainder of the bout. End result is a solid UD 10 for Lewis (97-94, 97-91, 97-91), who boosts his career totals to 25-7-3 (18), compared to a post-fight mark of 35-19 (26) for Lenhart.

Jan. 11, 1940: Next up is a Friday fight night at the Forum in Montreal. It’s an abbreviated card but with an intriguing feature that matches a fan favorite, LW Dave Castilloux, with an aging but still highly ranked LW contender, #10 Cecil Payne. Good opportunity for the Canadian fighter to move up the ranks, as Payne is at Post-Prime. Castilloux takes charge with a big round four, and Payne shows a trace of swelling around his right eye at the end of the round. Big points lead (50-46) for Castilloux at the midway point. Round six sees more trouble for Payne, as he suffers cuts both above and below the injured eye. Payne becomes more aggressive in the later rounds, but in the end the cuts around his eye cause a late stoppage with Castilloux well ahead on points. TKO 10 for Castilloux to improve his career record to 22-5-3 (9). The loss drops Payne to 41-15-4 (9).

Jan. 12, 1940: Havana’s Gran Stadium is the scene for the next fistic action, a big card featuring FWs in both the main event – which is for the WBA FW title – and two FW contenders in the main supporting bout. The main support pairs ex-WBA FW Champ Simon Chavez with newly-crowned USBA FW Champion Everett Rightmire. The two met once before, back in 1933 when both were at Pre-Prime, resulting in a UD 10 win for Chavez. The bout remains close in the early going, but some strong shots from Chavez in round four end up causing some swelling to appear under both eyes of Rightmire. Chavez holds a narrow points lead (48-47, according to the unofficial ringside observer) at the midway point. Rightmire battles back but Chavez retains his focus, being the more aggressive of the two, even in the later rounds. End result is a UD 10 for Chavez (98-93, 97-94, 96-95), repeating his earlier triumph. Post-bout career records: Chavez, 26-12-2 (6); Rightmire, 28-8-3 (13). Then, in the main event, Chalky Wright makes the fourth defense of his WBA FW title, facing hometown favorite, the “Cuban Bon Bon,” ex-Champ Kid Chocolate. Fifth career meeting and the prior results between these two stand at a win, a loss and two draws apiece. Kid Chocolate is at Post-Prime but still manages to look sharp in the opening few rounds. In fact, he catches Wright with an uppercut in the very opening round, forcing the Champ to cover up. More of the same in round four, when the Cuban challenger stuns Wright with a right hook. Wright bounces back with a big round five, causing noticeable swelling around the right eye of Kid Chocolate; nonetheless, the unofficial card has Chocolate ahead (49-46) at this point. Chocolate remains the aggressor throughout the middle rounds of the bout, with little effect on Wright until round nine, when a cut appears over the Champion’s left eye, in addition to a trace of swelling under his right eye. Both men begin to tire and, surprisingly, the unofficial card has the bout even (95-all) heading into the final five rounds. Then, in round 11, Chocolate is able to re-open the cut over Wright’s eye, and the cut is ruled too dangerous to allow the bout to continue. In a controversial decision, Kid Chocolate regains the title via a TKO 11 on the cuts stoppage. The win lifts the Cuban fighter to 39-8-7 (17), while the hapless Wright slips to 34-11-4 (14).

Jan. 12, 1940: Next up is a card at Phoenix’s Dodge Stadium. Featured bout matches K. O. Morgan and USBA BW Champion Georgie Pace for Morgan’s NABF BW title. Both men enter the bout on three-bout winning streaks, and Morgan has the advantage of having won their only prior meeting (a UD 12 for the USBA title) back in 1938. Morgan is the aggressor in the early rounds, but little action occurs until round five, when Pace connects with a winging right that stuns Morgan, who is forced to cover up and retreat with a rapidly swelling right eye as a result of a big round five for the challenger. Nonetheless, the unofficial card still has Morgan ahead (58-56) at the midway point. Into the middle rounds, and Morgan continues his aggressive approach. Pace rallies to take rounds seven through nine, which is enough to forge ahead (by 86-85) on the unofficial card. Close into the final rounds, with round 10 going for Morgan and round 11, for Pace. Both men are looking for the KO in the final round, which is relatively even. The bout goes to the scorecards and, after a long wait, it is declared a majority draw (115-113 for Pace, 114-114, 114-114). A fair result although it seems Pace was the moral victor – perhaps a third meeting in the future? Post-bout career marks: Morgan, 31-11-6 (17); Pace, 23-7-2 (17).
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:45 PM   #1249
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Jan. 1940 - Part 2 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the second half of January 1940, encompassing a total of 48 bouts, including one WBA title bout.

Jan. 18, 1940: Time for another Friday night “Down Under” card, this time in Sydney. No titles at stake, and the main event pairs former CBU LW Champ, South African Laurie Stevens, with long-time LW contender but now an aging veteran, Ray Miller, who is nearing the end of his long career. First meeting of the two, and the early action favors Stevens who lands a huge shot near the end of round two; Miller manages to survive the onslaught but comes away with a rapidly swelling right eye. Then, in round three, Stevens is cut under his left eye but fortunately the cut is not in a difficult spot and has little impact on the fight. Round five, more trouble for Miller who is cut under his left eye and then is decked by a Stevens punch but saved by the bell. The bout lasts just one more round as Miller proves unable to withstand more punishment from Stevens in the sixth. TKO 6 for Stevens. Post- bout career records: Stevens, 25-6-1 (17); Miller, 43-22-3 (19).

Jan. 19, 1940: Next up, at the French Riviera in Cannes, is a 10-round, non-title bout in the Flyweight division heading the card there. The two protagonists are France’s Eugene Huat, who has risen to top 10 status, and Spaniard Fortunato Ortega. Both are attempting to move up in the ranks and possibly challenge for the EBU title belt later in the year. It’s the second meeting of the two, who battled to a draw in one prior bout. Trouble for Huat in the opening round when Ortega rips open a gash over his right eye. In round two, despite the best efforts from Huat’s corner, the cut is still bleeding. The cut is reopened once, in round three, and a second time – leading to an early stoppage – in round four. TKO 4 for Ortega on the cuts stoppage. The win pushes the Spaniard’s career record to 25-9-4 (13). The loss leaves Huat at 31-19-7 (14).

Jan. 19, 1940: Next fistic action is back in the States at Sicks Stadium in Seattle. A sold-out crowd is on hand as local favorite Freddie Steele is defending his WBA MW title in the main event. First up is a supporting bout matching two HWs: Jimmy Mendes and Abe Simon, both of whom are former NABF HW titleholders (in fact, Simon took the title from Mendes via a TKO in 1939 but then lost it in a subsequent outing). Their second encounter proves to be a brief one, as Mendes puts Simon down for the count midway through the opening stanza. KO 1 for Mendes runs his career record to 36-10-4 (29). Post-bout, Simon dips to 24-3-1 (18). Impressive display of raw power puts Mendes back in the HW picture as a top contender. In the feature, Steele makes the fifth defense of the WBA MW title, facing newly crowned CBU MW titleholder Lou Brouillard, whom Steele defeated previously in a NABF title contest. Steele, who is riding an eight-bout winning streak, comes out as the aggressor, taking the fight to Brouillard. In round three, he stuns the Canadian challenger with a hard uppercut. A big hook from Steele staggers Brouillard in round four. The end comes a round later when Brouillard, also suffering from a cut over his right eye, is decked by a hard shot from Steele and put down and out. KO 5 for Steele. Post-bout career marks: Steele, 46-6-1 (30); Brouillard, 31-12-3 (14). It should be noted that Brouillard was at Post-Prime for this bout which may explain the lack of any meaningful resistance on his part.

Jan. 25, 1940: Next up is a Friday night card at Manila’s Rizal Arena. It’s an abbreviated card (only four bouts), but they are headlined by a pair of OPBF title bouts featuring Filipino fighters. In the first of these, Yoicihiro Hanada makes a second bid for the OPBF Flyweight title currently held by Small Montana; Montana won their one prior bout via a MD 12 in November 1939. The rematch proves to be another close bout, a defensive struggle between the two boxers with Montana holding a narrow lead (58-57) on the unofficial card at the midway point. In round seven, a small cut appears on the mouth of the defending Champ, but the cut has little impact on the outcome of the fight. The bout goes the distance, and Montana escapes with a split decision draw (114-114, 118-115 Montana, 113-115 Hanada) to keep the belt. Post-bout career marks: 23-10-4 (8) for Montana; 22-8-2 (8) for Hanada. The second title bout, the OPBF BW title is on the line as Little Pancho makes his sixth defense of that belt, facing fellow Filipino Young Tommy. The two have met four times previously, with Little Pancho holding a 3-1 edge in their prior meetings. Slight edge to the defending Champ in terms of punches landed through the first half, although the unofficial scorer has the challenger ahead (59-57). Several close rounds are followed by a big round eight for Pancho, who seems to establish control at this point. By the end of round eight, there is a trace of swelling under the right eye of Tommy. A strong finish from Little Pancho enables him to retain the title via a UD 12 (119-111, 118-112, 117-113), running his career totals to 37-9-5 (9). The loss drops Young Tommy to 33-12-3 (14).

Jan. 26, 1940: Next fistic action is back in the UK at the Harringay Arena in London. The feature bout is for the GBU FW title, and it matches Frank Parkes (the titleholder) versus challenger Johnny McGrory. First meeting of the two, and it is Parkes’ first defense of this title in over a year (since 1938). Good effort by McGrory in the early rounds, particularly round three where he forces his way inside to land some effective blows. By the end of round five, there is noticeable swelling around the right eye of Parkes. Midway point of the bout, and the unofficial scorecard shows McGrory ahead (58-56). It takes a late surge from Parkes in rounds 10 and 11 to escape with a majority draw (113-115, 115-115, 114-114) to hang on to the belt. Post-bout career records: Parkes, 22-4-1 (14); McGrory, 24-6-2 (10).

Jan. 26, 1940: The month wraps up with a big card at the Coliseum Arena in New Orleans. Headlining the card is a USBA LH title bout, as Eddie Booker, coming off his first career loss (to Billy Conn in a WBA title clash) faces veteran Al Gainer, winner of his last five to earn a second title shot (having lost to Maxie Rosenbloom in an NABF title bout). First meeting of the two. Action picks up in round two, when both men are cut over their respective left eyes. The cut over Gainer’s eye is re-opened in round five but, at the midway point, the unofficial card shows Gainer well ahead on points (by a margin of 60-55). Booker gets more and more aggressive as the bout wears on, focusing on the cut over Gainer’s left eye. The cut is re-opened a second time in round nine, and again in round 11, but in the end, Gainer survives and takes the title via a solid UD 12 (117-111, 116-113, 118-110), punctuating the win with a huge left that stuns Booker in the final round. With the win, Gainer improves to 27-7-1 (17) overall. Booker’s second straight loss leaves him at 21-2 (18).
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Old 02-10-2017, 11:48 AM   #1250
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Feb. 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of February 1940, encompassing a total of 60 bouts.

Feb. 2, 1940: The month commences with a Friday night card at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City. The feature matches two veteran FWs, both still ranking among the top five contenders, in a non-title affair as Freddie Miller faces Battling Battalino. Both are now at Post-Prime, and Battalino still has memories of a UD 12 win in their only prior meeting, back in 1932. Battalino starts well and begins piling up an early points lead. In round four, Miller suffers a cut over his right eye. Battalino holds a solid lead (49-46, according to the unofficial scorer) at the midway point. The cut, after being re-opened a couple of times, leads to an early stoppage. TKO 7 for Battalino on the cuts stoppage. Post- bout career records: Battalino, 41-13-2 (15); Miller, 37-12-1 (15).

Feb. 3, 1940: Next card is in Europe at the Sports Palace in Rome, Italy. No EBU or major European fights to report, so the feature matches a couple of boxers from overseas: MWs Ken Overlin and Antonio Fernandez. Overlin boxes well although Fernandez manages to keep the bout reasonably close through the opening three rounds. Then, in rounds four and five, Overlin’ superior skills begin to dominate, and he forges a solid points lead (49-46 on the unofficial card) at the midway point. From this point on, there is noticeable swelling around the right eye of Fernandez, and Overlin coasts to a solid UD 10 win (99-92, 100-91, 97-91) to raise his career record to 36-5-5 (13). The loss leaves Fernandez at 30-13-3 (12).

Feb. 3, 1940: Next fistic action is back in the States at Miami Stadium. On the agenda is a NABF title tilt, preceded by a non-title bout involving two top 10 FWs: Mike Belloise and 22-0 Harold Hoshino. The bout is close through the early rounds, with Hoshino holding a slight lead in terms of punches landed. In round five, Hoshino staggers Belloise with a big uppercut; the unofficial scorer has Hoshino ahead (49-46) at the midway point. More of the same later in the bout, when in round eight another Hoshino uppercut puts Belloise on the deck for the first and only time. Belloise arises, but the by the end of the round he shows signs of wear and tear, with a cut nose and swollen left eye. Another impressive performance by Hoshino, who takes a UD 10 (99-90 on all three cards) to run his record to 23-0 (14), leaving Belloise at 35-9-5 (9) after the loss. Hoshino’s camp is hoping for a title shot before the year is out. In the feature, Tony Shucco makes the first defense of his newly-won NABF LH title, facing challenger Gus Lesnevich in the first meeting of these two. The bout remains close through the early rounds but not much in the way of action until Lesnevich is cut ove his right eye in round six. At the midway point, the unofficial card has Lesnevich ahead by a slim margin (58-57). The cut is reopened in round nine, and the fight appears to be even headed into the final two rounds. After a big round 11, Lesnevich appears to have the upper hand. However, he becomes overly aggressive in round 12, and is called for several low blows. The ref rules the fouling to be blatant, and Shucco is declared the winner via a controversial DQ 12 call. Post-bout career marks: Shucco, 33-12 (11); Lesnevich, 27-4-1 (14). There is a lot of hue and cry over the outcome of this one, so a rematch is ordered in two months’ time.

Feb. 9, 1940: Next up is a Friday night card at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. Feature bout is for the Commonwealth BW title, and Canadian Horace Gwynne is here to defend that belt versus GBU BW Champ Benny Sharkey. Both men are at Post-Prime for this bout, and Gwynne has prevailed in each of two prior meetings (via UD in 1937 and MD in 1935). Sharkey serves notice when he decks Gwynne with a short, clean uppercut near the end of the opening stanza; Gwynne is saved by the bell. Sharkey continues on the attack and is rewarded with an early points lead (59-54, according to the unofficial card) midway through the bout; however, Gwynne has landed some good shots of his own, enough to cause noticeable swelling to appear around the left eye of Sharkey. Gwynne tries to battle back and become more aggressive in the later stages, but this proves vulnerable as Sharkey lands a big shot to put him down a second time – this time he arises at the count of eight – in round nine. Sharkey goes on to lift the belt, although one judge – probably influenced by the pro-Gwynne crowd – called it a draw. MD 12 for Sharkey (114-114, 113-113, 115-110) who improves to 35-14-2 (19) with the win. Gwynne drops to 24-8-1 (14).

Feb.10, 1940: Next fistic action is back in the UK at the Stadium in Liverpool. The GBU MW title is on the line, with Jock McAvoy making his first defense of that belt in over a year, taking on challenger Arthur “Ginger” Sadd, in Sadd’s first try for a title of any kind. Sadd seems to be ready for the challenge, as he manages to land some heavy leather in the opening frame, causing a trace of swelling to appear around the right eye of McAvoy. Buoyed by this good start, Sadd becomes the aggressor in the early rounds of the bout. In round four, some bad luck though, as Sadd sustains a cut over his left eye. From this point, the bout begins to turn in McAvoy’s favor. He manages to stun Sadd with a big uppercut in the eighth round, and then the cut becomes a bigger issue as the bout wears on, finally resulting in a late stoppage. TKO 11 for McAvoy, who retains the belt. Post-bout career records: McAvoy, 33-14-5 (22); Sadd, 29-14 (18).

Feb. 10, 1940: The Cow Palace in San Francisco is the venue for the next fistic action. No titles, but an important HW bout serves as the main event as Max Baer faces Joe “Bingo” Banovic. Banovic, now a step slower, is in the Post-Prime of his career while Baer is looking for another title shot. Baer looks sharp early, with his punches on target, and yhe lands a devastating uppercut with about 30 seconds left in the opening round that puts Banovic down and out. Impressive one-punch KO power from Baer. The KO 1 result lifts Max’s career record to 30-13 (26); it is his second straight win, bouncing back from a disheartening one round title loss to Joe Louis in 1939. The loss drops the rapidly aging Banovic to 39-17-2 (11).
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Old 02-17-2017, 02:26 PM   #1251
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Feb. 1940 - Part 2 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the second half of February 1940, encompassing a total of 54 bouts. Two WBA title bouts are included in this report.

Feb. 16, 1940: Friday night fights “Down Under” at Melbourne, Australia. A fairly light but packed card, with two title bouts on the agenda. The first is for the Commonwealth WW title, with Ernie Roderick traveling from the UK to face Aussie challenger Jack McNamee. The bout is close through the early rounds, with the challenger, McNamee, holding a slight lead (58-57) at the midway point, according to the unofficial card. By round seven, there is a trace of swelling under the left eye of McNamara. However, a round later, there is noticeable swelling around the right eye of Roderick. In round 11, a sharp blow from McNamee rips open a cut on Roderick’s forehead. A late surge from Roderick in the final round falls just short, and McNamee walks away a MD 12 winner (116-114, 115-115, 116-115) and takes the belt. The win improves McNamee’s career mark to 25-7 (16); the loss leaves Roderick at23-10-3 (16). The second co-feature is for the OPBF FW title currently held by Japan’s Tsuneo Horiguchi, who is making his third defense against Aussie Eddie Miller, who at 15-1 is still at Pre-Prime and in his first title bout. Not much action until round five, when a big left from Horiguchi stuns Miller. A cut over Miller’s left eye is opened and continues to ooze blood for several rounds thereafter. The cut – caused by an accidental butt – leads to an early stoppage, and matters end with Horiguchi being declared the winner via a UTD 9 (79-73, 78-74, 78-74). Post- bout career records: Horiguchi, 25-7 (15); Miller, 15-2 (7).

Feb. 17, 1940: Next card is in Europe at the Ullevi Stadium in Gothenburg, Sweden. No titles on the line, but the main event matches two former WBA BW Champions as Johnny King faces Pete Sanstol. It is the third meeting of these two, with King having taken a UD in 1933 while Sanstol returned the favor with a UD win in 1936. Good opening couple of rounds for Sanstol. King becomes the aggressor, starting in round three. In the fourth round, an uppercut from King sends Sanstol tumbling to the deck; he resumes after taking a count of seven. In round five, Sanstol sustains a cut on his forehead. The midway point sees King ahead on the unofficial card (48-46). Late in round six, a crushing hook from King forces Sanstol to cover up. The cut is reopened once, but it does not prevent the bout from going the distance. Good action and effort from both fighters to the finish, and King is declared the winner via a SD 10 (95-94, 94-95, 95-94) to boost his career record to 47-6-1 (18). The loss leaves Sanstol at 38-13-5 (9).

Feb. 17, 1940: Next fistic action is a huge card at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, featuring WBA HW Champion Joe Louis. Some good supporting bouts, first with veteran LH “Slapsie Maxie” Rosenbloom, now in the Post-Prime of his career, facing up-and-comer Tommy Tucker, who is still at Pre-Prime. Solid boxing effort by Rosenbloom and, by the end of round five, there is puffiness under the left eye of Tucker, who appears to be taking a beating. At the midway point, the unofficial scorer has Rosenbloom well ahead (by a count of 49-45). Rosenbloom goes on to a comfortable UD 10 win although one of the judges had it fairly close (95-94, 99-91, 99-91). Post-bout career totals: Rosenbloom, 49-13-6 (18); Tucker, 15-2-1 (10). In the next co-feature, it is the “British Brown Bomber,” Tommy Martin, visiting stateside to take on the aging veteran, Tommy Loughran, who is still trying to make his mark in the HW ranks despite nearing the end of a long and illustrious career. The two boxers go at it in a less than scintillating affair, and Loughran manages to pull out a slight lead (48-47 on the unofficial card) by the midway point. There is a trace of swelling around the left eye of Martin as the bout heads into the later rounds. Martin manages to stage a late rally to win the last two rounds and secure a majority draw (96-94 Martin, 95-95, 95-95) to run his career totals to 25-7-2 (15). Loughran ends the bout at 63-14-5 (20). Finally, it is time for the fighter everyone has come to see, as Joe Louis takes to the ring, defending his WBA HW title against knockout artist “Big Charley R” Charley Retzlaff, who has risien in the ranks by winning eight of his last nine, including impressive wins over contenders Joe “Bingo” Banovic and Buddy Baer. Less than two minutes into the opening round, Louis connects and floors Retzlaff with a big shot. Retzlaff arises after taking a seven-count and tries to cover up to last the round. However, Joe’s killer instinct has kicked in, and he follows with a second KD from a big combination and, shortly thereafter, the bout is waved off. TKO 1 for Louis, who retains the title and improves his record to 30-1 (28) – the one stain being a controversial loss to Schmeling. Retzlaff ends up at 33-17 (25).

Feb. 23, 1940: Next up is a very light Friday night card at Manila, with only four bouts and no titles at stake. The main event pairs two top five Flyweight contenders, as Brit Benny Lynch travels here to face Little Dado, who remains unbeaten headed into this, his 20th pro bout. It is the first meeting of the two. Dado, spurred on by the hometown crowd, starts well, and by the end of round two there are signs of swelling around the left eye of Lynch. By the midway point, the unofficial card has a sizable lead for the Filipino fan favorite (by a count of 49-46) and the swelling around Lynch’s eye is worsening. Then, in round six, the ref steps in and calls a halt – unusual to see a TKO called for swelling as opposed to cuts and, despite protests from Lynch’s corner, that is exactly what happens. TKO 6 for Dado, who remains unbeaten, wrapping up his Pre-Prime career with a perfect 20-0 (12) mark. The loss leaves Lynch at 31-9 (16).

Feb.24, 1940: Next fistic action is back in the UK at the Olympia in London. Featured is a GBU title bout supported by a non-title matchup of two top five LWs, with Jack Kid Berg, the “Whitechapel Whirlwind,” facing Al Roth, who is coming off the loss of his NABF LW title. First meeting of the two. Early punches landed edge for Berg, who stuns Roth with a big hook right before the bell sounds to end round five. Berg has a sizable points lead (50-45, on the unofficial card) at the midway point, and Berg goes on to a fairly routine UD 10 win (98-92 on all three cards). Post-bout career marks: Berg, 43-14-5 (14); Roth, 33-8-1 (11). Then, in the main event, Jackie Brown makes the first defense of his GBU Flyweight title since 1938. His opponent is Peter Kane. The two have not met before. Kane gets off to a strong start, and Brown tries to become more aggressive, starting in round four. A combination from Kane puts Brown down for a count of five in the fifth round, and the unofficial card has Kane well ahead (59-56) at the midway point. Brown begins to show signs of swelling around his left eye starting in round six, but, as the bout wears on, Kane also exhibits signs of swelling under his left eye. Kane loses a point for a low blow in round nine, and Brown is able to close the points gap and secure a majority draw (114-115 Kane, 115-115, 115-115) to keep the belt, despite the one knockdown for Kane. Post-bout career records: Brown, 37-14-5 (12); Kane, 20-2-1 (10).

Feb. 24, 1940: The month wraps with a huge card at Madison Square Garden in New York City, with a WBA title on the line in the main event. The main supporting bout has ex-LH Champ Tiger Jack Fox, itching for another title shot, but first he must get past Melio Bettina, in a rematch of their 1939 encounter that ended in a draw. Good opening round for Bettina, who manages to land some heavy leather and cause a trace of swelling to appear around the right eye of Fox. In round two, a Bettina uppercut finds its target and stuns Fox. Fox bides his time, and in round five he drops Bettina with a barrage of blows. Bettina arises after taking a five count, and he still manages to hold a slight points edge (48-47 on the unofficial card) despite the knockdown. Fox continues to fire away as the bout enters its later stages, and he nails Bettina with a big hook with just seconds remaining. The bout goes to the scorecards, and this time Fox prevails, but only by a narrow SD 10 (96-93, 94-95, 95-94) as Bettina proved himself to be a worthy opponent. Post-fight, Fox improves to 47-5-1 (33) while Bettina’s third career loss drops him to 23-3-2 (11). Then, in the main event, Henry Armstrong returns to the ring, putting his WBA WW title on the line against “the Croat Comet,” Fritizie Zivic. Zivic has fought three times before for the NABF title, but never before for the WBA crown; it is the first meeting of the two. Big opening round for Armstrong, who is like a whirlwind on the attack; Zivic does well to maintain his footing. Armstrong continues with a two-fisted assault in round two and moves inside in the third. Zivic begins to find the range, and the bout is reasonably close (48-47 for “Homicide Hank” on the unofficial card) after the first five rounds. The end comes suddenly in the ninth round when Armstrong traps Zivic in the corner and fires a damaging cross that drops Zivic to the canvas. Zivic is counted out, and it is a KO 9 win for Henry Armstrong. Post-bout records: Armstrong, 32-3-3 (26); Zivic, 26-8-4 (15). There is talk of Armstrong, having claimed WBA title belts in three different divisions, of moving up and trying for the MW title as well.
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Old 03-13-2017, 05:15 PM   #1252
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Mar. 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of March 1940, encompassing a total of 58 bouts.

Mar. 1, 1940: The month kicks off with a Friday night card at the War Memorial Auditorium in Syracuse, New York. No titles on the line, but the main event matches two top five WWs in a 10-round, non-title affair: #3 Izzy Jannazzo faces #5 Ruby Goldstein. Jannazzo, who is unbeaten in his last four, is angling for a title shot, and he hopes to add to his credentials with a win over the aging vet Goldstein, now in the Post-Prime of his career. In round two, a Goldstein cross stuns Jannazzo, who is lucky to avoid going down and further punishment (via use of the cover up strategy). The rest of the bout sees Jannazzo, a crafty boxer, outpointing Goldstein, a big slugger who gradually becomes more aggressive as the bout wears on. Slight edge for Jannazzo (48-47, according to the unofficial card) at the midway point, and in the end, the solid boxing performance from Jannazzo is rewarded with a MD 10 (97-93, 95-95, 98-93) although one judge scored the bout even. The win lifts Jannazzo to 29-4-1 (13); the loss drops Goldstein to 44-14-4 (29).

Mar. 2, 1940: Next card is at the Stadium in Liverpool. Again, no titles at stake, and the feature has newly-crowned GBU LW Champion Bert Gilroy facing Anton Christoforidis. In round one, Gilroy gets careless and walks into a cross from Christoforidis; he takes an eight-count before resuming, wisely covering up to last the round. As a result, Gilroy is battling from behind the rest of the way but lacks the firepower to seriously test Christoforidis, who goes on to claim a fairly comfortable UD 10 (98-91, 99-91, 95-94), although one judge (obviously influenced by the pro-Gilroy crowd) appeared overly generous in giving several close rounds to the Brit. Post-bout career totals: Christoforidis, 20-4 (12); Gilroy, 20-6-2 (14).

Mar. 8, 1940: Next fistic action is at Chicago’s Comiskey Park, and the main event matches two aging veterans, Jimmy McLarnin and Barney Ross, in a non-title affair. This represents the fifth meeting of these two all-time greats, with McLarnin holding a 3-1 edge in their prior encounters. However, age has taken its toll, with McLarnin now at End career stage, while Ross is at Post-Prime. In the early rounds, Ross seems the sharper of the two and builds a lead in punches landed and points (49-46 on the unofficial card) at the halfway point. Then, in round six, McLarnin begins to work inside more effectively, ripping open a cut over Ross’ right eye. The cut proves to be of little impact, and McLarnin appears to be slow, tired and plodding through the final few rounds, so the bout ends with a fairly comfortable UD 10 win for Ross (96-95, 99-91, 99-91), although one judge had it relatively close, a generous result for McLarnin. Post-fight, Ross improves to 34-11-1 (11), while McLarnin ends the bout at 53-13-1 (24).

Mar. 9, 1940: Next up is a card at the Sportpalast in Berlin, featuring Max Schmeling in the headliner, as Max defends his EBU HW title against countryman Ludwig Haymann. Interestingly, the two met once before – some 14 years earlier – when Max was on his way up, and the bout ended as a TKO win for Schemling. This time, Schmeling – the heavy favorite – dominates from the opening bell, and his hapless opponent is turned into a punching bag for most of the one-sided affair. Haymann is tiring as early as the fourth round, and he sports a shiner around his right eye, but – no cuts or knockdowns – just a solid punishing performance by Schmeling who claims a TKO 4 win after the ref steps in to save Haymann from further punishment. Post-bout career marks: Schmeling, 50-6-1 (34); Haymann, 36-18-5 (20). Schmeling retains his EBU HW title and remains the #1 HW contender to Joe Louis.

Mar. 9, 1940: Next is a solid card in New Orleans. Featured is a USBA title clash, preceded by a supporting bout matching two top 10 BWs: LABF Champ Sixto Escobar and USBA Champ Georgie Pace, in a 10-round, non-title affair. First meeting of the two, and Escobar wastes little time, landing a big shot some 30 seconds into the bout, and Pace hits the canvas, finally arising at the count of eight, then covering up to last the round and avoid further damage. Escobar is ahead by two (48-46 on the unofficial card) at the midway point but, having just hit Post-Prime career stage, he slows markedly in the later rounds, allowing Pace to battle his way back into the bout. In round nine, Pace connects with a crushing right to the jaw, staggering Escobar, who is lucky to remain upright. Pace then goes on to win the last two rounds, which is just enough to secure a SD 10 win (92-97 Escobar, 95-94 Pace, 95-94 Pace) to improve his overall record to 24-7-2 (7); the loss drops Escobar to 31-8-3 (10). In the feature, the “Sweetwater Swatter,” still unbeaten Lew Jenkins makes his first defense of the USBA LW title, facing a tough challenger in Eddie Cool. Solid start for Jenkins, causing initial swelling around the right eye of the challenger as early as round two, propels him to a comfortable points lead (59-55, on the unofficial card) at the midway point. Jenkins, who also suffers from some puffiness around his right eye, manages to put Cool down with a barrage of blows in round nine, then holds on for a solid UD 12 (116-111, 118-109, 116-110) to keep the belt. Post-bout career records: Jenkins, 22-0-2 (11); Cool, 33-14-5 (11).

Mar. 15, 1940: It’s time for the Friday night fights “Down Under” in Sydney, Australia, with Aussie and Filipino fighters headlining a good card. The co-feature and main support matches long-time Flyweight contenders Small Montana, the reigning OPBF Fly Champion, with visiting Frenchman Valentin Angelmann, in a non-title tilt. There’s a lengthy feeling out process, and the bout remains close through the early rounds. (The unofficial scorer at ringside has it even, 48-48, at the midway point.) Angelmann is able to pull ahead slightly and hangs on to win a narrow UD 10 (96-95 on all three cards) despite a late surge from Montana. Post-bout, Angelmann improves to 35-18-1 (12), while Montana ends the bout at 23-11-4 (8). In the feature, the OPBF BW title is on the line, as Little Pancho makes his seventh defense of the belt he won back in 1937, facing a familiar foe in the Aussie challenger, Mickey Miller. The two have met three times previously, with Pancho winning all three, but two have been relatively close (a pair of MDs) in 1936 and again, for this same OPBF belt, in 1938. Miller assumes the role of aggressor through the early rounds, but he is vulnerable to some solid counterpunching from Little Pancho, who is able to compile a large lead in the punches landed stat. Midway point sees Little Pancho ahead on points (59-55, according to the unofficial scorer), and things do not get better for Miller, who has to battle fatigue and a swollen right eye in the later rounds. End result is a solid UD 12 win for Little Pancho (118-111, 116-113, 117-112). Post-bout records: Pancho, 38-9-5 (9); Miller, 25-8-2 (16). This win lifts Pancho to #2 in the overall BW rankings, and his connections are angling for a WBA title shot some time later in 1940.
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Old 03-25-2017, 09:55 AM   #1253
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Mar. 1940 - Part 2 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the second half of March 1940, encompassing a total of 59 bouts. Two WBA title bouts are included in this report.

Mar. 16, 1940: Back to Europe for a card at Gothenburg’s Ullevi Stadium. A pair of LH bouts top the card. In the first of these, Heinz Lazek faces off against Gustave Roth for the EBU LH title vacated by Adolf Heuser, the current WBA LH Champ. One prior result, a SD 12 for Lazek, in early 1938 for this same belt. Lazek connects with a big right in round four, forcing Roth to cover up. In round five, a Lazek cross drops Roth for a count of eight. Roth arises, sporting a rapidly swelling right eye. Roth tries to get more aggressive in the later rounds, and he does manage to open a cut over the right eye of Lazek in round 10. In the end, the cut proves not to be a factor, as Lazek goes on to regain the title via a UD 12 (116-112, 118-110, 118-110) to run his career totals to 30-7 (20). Roth slips to 37-18-3 (13) after the loss. In the main event, Heuser makes the first defense of the WBA LH title he won in late 1939, and his opponent is an aginig ex-Champ, John Henry Lewis. By round three, both men are showing the effects of a bruising battle: Lewis, with a rapidly swelling right eye; Heuser, with a gash over his right eye. Bout is scored even (48-all) after the first five rounds, according to the unofficial ringside observer. Punches landed stats favor Heuser, but Lewis steps is the pace, employing a more aggressive approach. In round eight, Lewis is cut over his swollen right eye. Heuser tries to take advantage, moving inside in round nine, but he leaves himself open for more damage to his cut eye from Lewis, and the cut is re-opened and deemed out of control. Lewis thus prevails via a TKO 9 on the cuts stoppage. Post-bout career marks: Lewis, 26-7-3 (19); Heuser, 35-9-1 (17).

Mar. 22, 1940: Friday night fight card at the Forum in Montreal is next. Featured is another LH clash, with Canadian veteran Charley Belanger, the reigning CBU LH Champ, matched with rising star Archie Moore in a non-title bout. First meeting of the two, and Belanger is battling age and coming off three straight losses. Moore does well early, landing repeatedly to hold an edge in punches landed, as well as causing some initial swelling around the right eye of Belanger. Solid points lead (50-45) favoring Moore at the midway point, according to the unofficial ringside scorer. Belanger tries to get more aggressive in the later rounds, but he lacks the firepower and stamina to trouble Moore, who goes on to register a solid, but unspectacular, UD 10 win (100-90, 99-91, 98-92). Post-bout, Moore improves to 18-1-2 (14) while Belanger ends the bout at 42-22 (19).

Mar. 23, 1940: Next fistic action is at London’s Harringay Arena, and the main event features HWs as veteran Tommy Farr faces a visitor from across the seas in the form of Elmer “Kid Violent” Ray, in a non-title affair. Farr’s excellent boxing poses problems for Ray, who is unable to break through, enabling Farr to compile an early points lead (49-46, on the unofficial card) by the halfway point. Ray becomes even more aggressive as the bout heads into the later stages, but he still struggles with his timing against a tricky opponent. No cuts or knockdowns, and a confident Farr is content to retreat into a defensive shell during the last two rounds. End result is a solid UD 10 for Farr (96-94, 97-93, 96-94) who improves to 46-14-3 (16) with the win. Ray, who will be at Post-Prime starting with his next outing, ends the bout at 42-11 (28).

Mar. 23, 1940: Next up is a packed card at New York’s Madison Square Garden. Featured is an NABF title bout, supported by a co-feature that sees the return to the ring of “the Roman Warrior,” former WBA LW Champion Tony Canzoneri. Canzoneri’s opponent is current LABF LW Champ Pedro Montanez; both men are at Post-Prime for this non-title clash, with Canzoneri holding an earlier win via UD for the WBA title in early 1939. Montanez is the aggressor through the earlier stages of this bout, but Canzoneri’s defense and counter-punching poses problems for Montanez, who begins to show signs of swelling around his right eye from the midway point. Canzoneri continues to outscore his opponent and goes on to take a comfortable UD 10 win (98-92, 98-92, 97-93). Post-bout career records: Canzoneri, 50-5-4 (17); Montanez, 33-8 (16). Main event is for the NABF HW title, with Roscoe Toles defending against challenger Art Lasky. Both men are riding three-bout winning streaks, and Toles prevailed via a split decision in one prior encounter, for the USBA title, back in 1938. The hard-hitting Lasky, now at Post-Prime, finds it difficult to cope with Toles’ slick boxing skills, and Toles manages to rip open a cut over the left eye of Lasky in round five. Solid points lead for Toles (59-55, according to the unofficial card) at the midway point. Lasky continues his aggressive approach, but leaves himself open for a big shot from Toles that puts him on the deck briefly in the later rounds. Lasky recovers, but Toles goes on to keep the belt, taking a solid UD 12 win (117-110 on all cards). Post-bout, Toles improves to 31-6-3 (6); Lasky slips to 27-9-2 (26) after the loss.

Mar. 29, 1940: Mexico City is the venue for the next card, which is topped by a pair of title bouts. First of the co-features is for the LABF FW title recently vacated by Kid Chocolate, who ascended to the WBA title. Contending for the title are Cuban Filio Julian Echevarria and Venezuelan Simon Chavez; even though Chavez rates top billing as a former WBA titleholder, Echevarria has won all three of their prior meetings but is now at Post-Prime career stage. Not much in the way of action as the two boxers parry with each other for the opening rounds. Chavez holds a slight edge in punches landed and is also slightly ahead on the unofficial scorer’s card (by 58-56) at the midway point. Echevarria then mounts a strong rally, capturing rounds seven through nine to pull ahead. Chavez then bounces back, dropping Echevarria in round 10 for the bout’s only KD. The bout comes down to the final round, which goes to Echevarria, who ekes out a narrow SD 12 win (114-113, 112-115, 114-113), taking the final round to capture the LABF belt for the third time in his career. Post-bout career totals: Echevarria, 36-13-4 (12); Chavez, 26-13-2 (6). In the main event, it is the NABF FW title that is at stake, as hometown crowd favorite Baby Arizmendi faces off against Canadian Pete DeGrasse, the reigning CBU FW titleholder. In three prior bouts (including two for the WBA title), DeGrasse holds a 2-1 edge., but those two title bouts were back in 1933 and 1934. This time, the two boxers stage a close contest, with little to choose between the two but also little in the way of action, as both men seem wary to take too many chances. By round four, there is noticeable swelling around the left eye of the Canadian challenger. Points are even (57-all) at the midway point, at least according to the unofficial card. In the second half of the bout, Arizmendi gradually steps up the pace and appears to be gaining the upper hand. DeGrasse mounts a late surge which falls just short, so Arizmendi takes another SD 12 (115-114, 114-115, 116-113). As in the prior bout, the last round made the difference, and the Mexican fight fangs go home happy. Post-bout career records: Arizmendi, 40-9-2 (10); DeGrasse, 38-17-4 (10).

Mar. 30, 1940: Final card of the month is a good one, at Los Angeles’ Olympic Auditorium, and a WBA title is on the line. In the co-feature, the “Man of Steel,” NABF MW Champ Tony Zale, faces Aussie Fred Henneberry, the reigning OPBF MW Champion, in a 10-round, non-title contest. Henneberry comes out swinging, staggering Zale with some good shots in the opening round, and there is a trace of swelling around the left eye of Zale as a result. In round five, more trouble for Zale when Henneberry connects with a huge shot, dropping the “Man of Steel,” who arises after taking a count of three. Big points edge for Henneberry (49-45, on the unofficial card) at the halfway point. From here on, class begins to tell, as Zale bears down, going on the attack at every opportunity. He finally breaks through, decking Henneberry with an uppercut to the head in the final round. Henneberry manages to scramble to his feet, covering up to survive to the final bell, but the late KD is sufficient to give Zale a UD 10 win (95-93, 96-92, 95-93), despite a surprisingly strong showing from Henneberry. With the win, Zale improves to 27-2 (20), while Henneberry drops to 30-13-2 (12) after the loss. Zale, who has won his last 11 outings over a three-year period, is angling for a WBA title shot. In the main event, it is the WBA BW title that is at stake as Panama Al Brown defends that belt against K. O. Morgan, the current NABF BW titleholder. Morgan gets off to a solid start and proves to be a difficult opponent for Panama Al. In round four, Brown finally breaks through and lands some telling shots; both of Morgan’s eyes begin to swell as a result. Morgan wins the inside exchanges in round five, and by the end of the round, both of Brown’s eyes show signs of swelling as well. Early points edge for the challenger, K. O. Morgan (49-46, on the unofficial card). In round nine, Brown rips open a cut over the left eye of Morgan. Heading into the final five rounds, Morgan still leads, but the margin has been sliced to a single point (96-95, again according to the unofficial scorer at ringside). The bruising battle goes down to the wire in the final few rounds, with Morgan emerging victorious via a SD 15 (144-141, 141-144, 144-141) to run his record to 32-11-6 (17). Panama Al, who will be at Post-Prime with his next outing, ends the bout at 62-11-1 (22).
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Old 04-13-2017, 11:34 AM   #1254
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Apr. 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of April 1940, encompassing a total of 65 bouts.

Apr. 5, 1940: The month kicks off with a Friday night card at Atlantic City’s Convention Hall. The main event matches two top 10 LW contenders in a non-title affair, as Sammy Fuller faces Chino Alvarez. It is a rematch of a 1939 encounter that resulted in a TKO win for Alvarez. This time around, the punches landed stats through the early rounds favor Fuller, but in round five Alvarez lands a combination that drops Fuller; this knockdown is sufficient to put Alvarez ahead on points at the midway point (48-46, according to the unofficial card). Alvarez seals the win with a second, late KD in round nine, and Fuller’s face shows the effects with a swollen left eye by the end. Final result is a UD 10 win for Alvarez (by scores of 96-93, 98-91, 96-93), as Fuller put up a game effort but the two KDs were too much to overcome. Post-bout career marks: Alvarez, 35-12-4 (22); Fuller, 46-17-1 (19).

Apr. 6, 1940: Action back in the UK at the Stadium in Liverpool. Featured is visiting US FW contender Frankie Covelli, who faces homegrown fan favorite Frank Parkes, the current EBU and GBU FW titleholder. Covelli is coming off a WBA title loss but facing a daunting task as Parkes enjoys the support of the hometown crowd (and perhaps some hometown judging as well). Parkes is the more aggressive of the two, although both boxers emphasize defense first. The bout devolves into a tough, defensive struggle, with the unofficial card showing a slight edge for Covelli (48-47) at the midway point. Good round six from Parkes puts the issue in doubt. After a strong round in round nine from Covelli, the two both take an aggressive approach in round nine, and Parkes connects with a cross to the head that puts Covelli on the canvas. Covelli recovers, and the bout goes the distance, with Parkes taking a MD 10 verdict (97-92, 95-95, 96-93). Post-bout, Parkes improves to 23-4-1 (14) while Covelli ends the bout at 31-12-8 (7).

Apr. 6, 1940: Next fistic action is at Phoenix’ Dodge Theater, and featured is a non-title bout involving two HWs: long-time top 10 contender and knockout artist Max Baer, who faces reigning LABF titleholder Jimmy Mendes in a rematch of their 1938 encounter for the NABF HW belt that ended in a TKO for Mendes. This time, Baer takes charge from the opening bell, launching a vicious attack that culminates in a barrage of blows that sends Mendes to the canvas halfway through the opening round. Mendes arises at the count of nine, tries to cover up, but Baer’s killer instinct has kicked into high gear, and he follows up with a big shot that putts Mendes down and out. KO 1 for Baer, whose career stats move to 31-13 (27) with the win, as improves his prospects for a shot at Joe Louis’ WBA title in the near future. Mendes, who is now at Post-Prime, drops to 36-11-4 (29) with the loss.

Apr. 12, 1940: Next up is a Friday night card in San Juan, Puerto Rico. An NABF WW title bout featuring Puerto Rico’s own Cocoa Kid tops the agenda, as Kid defends that belt against challenger Jimmy Garrison, the current USBA WW titleholder. It’s a rematch of their New Year’s eve encounter (last bout of 1939) that resulted in a UD win for Kid. The bout devolves into a tactical battle and is very close through the first four rounds. By round five, momentum has swung to the challenger, who lands some telling shots, causing some initial swelling under the right eye of Cocoa Kid. A peek at the unofficial card at the midway point has Garrison with a sizable points lead (59-55), but Kid is the hometown favorite and defending Champ, so Garrison must remain vigilant. Kid steps up the pace in the second half of the bout, but Garrison’s defense remains rock solid. The bout goes the distance and Garrison ends up lifting the belt via a UD 12 (116-113, 116-112, 116-113). Post-bout career marks: Garrison, 25-3-3 (2); Kid, 36-6-4 (11).

Apr. 13, 1940: Back to Europe for a card in Rome. No European fighters to top the card, so a pair of American fighters are imported for the feature: Eddie Dolan and Young Corbett III, both of whom are ranked among the top five WW contenders. Both are former WBA Champions, and their one previous meeting (for the NABF WW title in 1936) resulted in a TKO win for Dolan. Early trouble for Corbett, who is at Post-Prime for this bout, when he sustains a severe cut over his right eye in round two. The cut continues to ooze blood, and Corbett’s corner is unable to bring the cut under the control. In round five, a second cut – a split lip – adds to Corbett’s woes, and the bout ends up with a cuts stoppage and another TKO win, a TKO 5, for Dolan. With the win, Dolan re-establishes his credentials as a WBA title contender. Post-bout career records: Dolan, 31-6-4 (13); Corbett, 55-18-6 (13).

Apr. 13, 1940: Big card at Detroit, topped by a USBA title contest. The protagonists in this bout are the holder, Johnny Romero, and the challenger, Holman Williams, a former WBA MW Champion. At stake is Romero’s USBA MW title, a belt held twice before by Williams. The two are 1-1 in their two prior meetings. Williams gets off to a solid start, landing some solid punches in the opening two rounds, sufficient enough to cause some initial swelling around the left eye of Romero. In round four, Romero moves to the inside and drills Williams with a sharp combination that drops the challenger to the deck. Williams arises after taking an eight count and bounces back quickly, when he rips open a cut over the left eye of Romero right before the end of the round. Romero, however, has got in enough good licks of his own to cause swelling around the right eye of the challenger. At the midway point, the unofficial scorer has Romero up by one (57-56) – a close fight. During the second half of the bout, Williams is the more active, pressuring his opponent and targeting the cut, which is re-opened in round nine and then again in round 10, with the ring doctor being called in to take a look. In the final round, Romero tries to be more aggressive, but the cut is re-opened once again, leading to a TKO stoppage. Williams becomes the USBA MW Champion for the third time via a TKO 12. Post-bout, Williams improves to 31-6 (20) and will be looking for another WBA title shot. Romero drops to 38-15 (24) with the loss, and he will be at Post-Prime career stage for his next outing.
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:29 AM   #1255
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Apr. 1940 - Part 2 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the second half of April 1940, encompassing a total of 50 bouts. Only WBA title bout is included in this report.

Apr. 19, 1940: Time for the “Friday Night Down Under” card in Melbourne, Australia. Topping the card are a pair of co-features matching prominent Aussie fighters with their visiting American counterparts. In the first of these encounters, WWs are featured as OPBF and CBU WW titleholder Jack McNamee faces Paul Junior. Early initiative is with the Aussie McNamee, and manages to forge a slight points lead (49-47) at the midway point, according to the unofficial card. Junior tries to become more aggressive in the second half of the bout, but he runs into trouble in round nine, when a big shot from McNamee puts Junior down en route to a very comfortable UD 10 win (100-89. 100-89, 100-91) to improve to 26-7 (16); Junior drops to 28-16-7 (15) after the loss. In the second co-feature, veteran MW Ron Richards takes on rising star Charley Burley. The action is slow to develop, but by round four Burley is clearly on top, and Richards is showing the effects with a rapidly swelling right eye. A Burley combination decks Richards in round five, and Burley continues to pummel away until the ref steps in to call a halt. TKO 5 for Burley. Post-bout career marks: Burley. 21-1 (19); Richards. 35-13-2 (24).

Apr. 20, 1940: Action north of the border at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Arena. Topping the card is a Commonwealth LW title bout, with Jack Kid Berg defending against a Canadian challenger, Dave Castilloux. First meeting of the two. Berg is on target early, scoring well while Castilloux takes a cautious approach, staying out of trouble but not doing much to disturb Berg. Slight points edge for Berg (58-57 on the unofficial card) at the halfway point, as Castilloux makes a bit of a surge to make the bout reasonably close. Berg’s superior stamina begins to tell in the later rounds, as a game Castilloux also has to deal with some swelling around both eyes. Castilloux, undaunted, is the aggressor in the later rounds, but Berg hangs on to retain the belt via a MD 12 (115-113, 114-114, 115-113) to run his career record to 44-14-5 (14) while Castilloux dips to 22-6-3 (9).

Apr. 20, 1940: Next fistic action is at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, and excitement is in the air as Midget Wolgast is making the 24th defense of his WBA Flyweight title he has held sinc 1931. His challenger is Spaniard Fortunato Ortega, who is making his first WBA title try after three unsuccessful attempts to wrest the EBU Flyweight belt. However, there is room for optimism in the challenger’s corner as Wolgast will be at Post-Prime for the first time in his career. Solid start for Wolgast, who appears to have the upper hand for the first three rounds. In round four, however, the Champ leaves himself open for a perfect cross from Ortega, who puts Wolgast on the deck. Scrambling to his feet after the count reaches three, Wolgast covers up to last the round. Nonetheless, despite the knockdown, the unofficial card has Wolgast ahead (by a count of 48-47) after the first five rounds. The bout remains close through the middle rounds, with Ortega’s chances boosted by a good showing in round seven. Starting in round eight, Wolgast begins to become more aggressive, applying pressure to his less experienced opponent. The unofficial card has the bout even (95-all) heading into the final “Championship” rounds. A second KD occurs in round 11, as an off-balance Wolgast is vulnerable to a barrage of blows from Ortega, and he goes down for a second time, with the count reaching nine before the Champion is able to resume. After taking a round to recover, Wolgast goes back on the offensive in round 13. By round 14, there is noticeable swelling around the right eye of the challenger, who has fought a tremendous fight but may have been a bit too passive in the closing rounds. It’s a long wait until the scorecards are finally read: one judge has it 143-141, for Ortega, another has it 142-142, a draw, and a third, also 143-141 for Ortega, who ends Wolgast’s long reign, capturing the WBA Flyweight belt via a MD 15. Post-bout records: 26-9-4 (13) for Ortega, and 50-6-1 (18) for Wolgast, whose seven-bout winning streak (his last loss was to Johnny King for the WBA BW title) is snapped. Strong early contender for “Fight of the Year” and also “Upset of the Year.”

Apr. 26, 1940: Next up is a Friday night card at Manila’s Rizal Arena. No titles, but young Flyweight contender Little Dado, perfect thus far at 20-0, who takes on Austrian fly Ernst Weiss in a non-title affair. Dado wastes little time, staggering Weiss with a big uppercut in the opening round; Weiss covers up to survive the round. Dado goes on to build a solid edge in punches landed, which translates to a solid points lead by the midway point (49-46, according to the unofficial scorer at ringside). In the later rounds, Weiss tries to become more aggressive, but all to no avail as Dado drops Weiss with a clean combination for the bout’s only KD in round nine. End result is a one-sided UD 10 for Dado (100-90, 99-90, 98-91) who remains unbeaten, now 21-0 (12), with the win. The loss leaves Weiss at 23-7-1 (8). Dado appears ready to step up to challenge for the OPBF regional title after another strong performance against a solid opponent.

Apr. 27, 1940: Back to the UK for a solid card at the Olympia in London. While a GBU title tilt headlines the card, on the undercard is an intriguing LH clash matching up-and-comer Freddie Mills with long-time EBU, CBU and GBU LH Champ Len Harvey, who is nearing the end of his long career. No titles at stake, as Harvey just lost his GBU LH crown in an upset loss to Bert Gilroy. A hook from Mills in the opening stanza stuns Harvey, and again in round two the aging veteran is forced to cover up as Mills lands a straight right. Mills goes on to hold a points edge at the halfway point (by a count of 49-47, according to the unofficial card). In round eight, a Mills hook puts Harvey on the deck and, while Harvey rallies with a solid round nine (causing some minor swelling around the right eye of Mills), it is the younger man who prevails in a “changing of the guard” in the LH division – UD 10 going to Mills (97-93, 96-95, 96-94) over the veteran Harvey. Post-bout career marks: Mills, 18-1 (13); Harvey, 49-25-3 (19). The final bout on the card is the main event, with Benny Sharkey putting the GBU BW title on the line against Johnny King, the former WBA BW Champ on the comeback trail. Tough ask for Sharkey, who was a KO victim in their one earlier meeting (back in 1938) and has the added burden of hitting Post-Prime career since. King is on target early, and by the end of the third round there is noticeable swelling around the right eye of Sharkey. Solid points lead for King at the midway point (58-56, according to the unofficial card). In round seven, King drops Sharkey with a barrage of blows, then follows up with another KD in round nine (with a wicked hook to the head), and then two more KDs in round 11, before the ref calls a halt. TKO 11 for King, who improves to 48-6-1 (19) with the win. The loss leaves Sharkey at 35-15-2 (19).

Apr. 27, 1940: The month wraps up with a good card at New York City’s Madison Square Garden. A pair of LH bouts top the card, with the first co-feature matching Gus Lesnevich versus Pal Silvers in a non-title affair. Lesnevich, still stinging from a controversial DQ loss of his NABF title to Tony Shucco, holds two prior wins over Silvers, who has since hit Post-Prime career stage. Solid boxing from Lesnevich enables him to build an early points lead (unofficial scorer has Lesnevich well ahead, by 50-54, at the halfway point). With little to worry from his shopworn opponent, Lesnevich eases up in the final two rounds en route to a convincing UD 10 victory (100-90, 99-91, 100-90) and ends the bout at 28-4-1 (14); Silvers drops to 40-17-5 (15) with the loss. Then, in the second co-feature, the NABF LH title is at stake as Tony Shucco, the man who took that title from Lesnevich in a controversial ending, defends against former WBA Champ Billy Conn, himself still smarting from the loss of his title via a controversial DQ to Adolf Heuser. After a solid round three, Conn moves inside in round four but does little damage. Shucco is able to hold his own through the first half of the bout, and he holds a slight edge at the midway point (58-57, according to the unofficial ringside scorer). Both men appear content to fire away from long distance as the bout heads into the later rounds. Conn exhibits more stamina, but Shucco appears to be the one landing the more telling blows and, after the bout goes the distance, Shucco is rewarded with a MD 12 win (116-112, 114-114, 117-111). Post-bout career marks: Shucco, 34-12 (11); Conn, 22-3-2 (11). It will be back to the drawing board for Conn, while Shucco faces a likely rematch with Lesnevich, winner of the first of the two co-features.
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Old 05-12-2017, 01:19 PM   #1256
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May. 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of May 1940, encompassing a total of 41 bouts. Only WBA title bout is included in this report.

May 3, 1940: The month commences with a Friday night card at Atlantic City. Topping the relatively thin card is a USBA FW title bout, with Everett Rightmire making his first defense of that belt against a tough challenger in 23-0 Harold Hoshino. First meeting of the two, and Rightmire is coming off a recent loss to former WBA Champ Simon Chavez. The early action seems to favor Rightmire, but by round two, Hoshino has taken charge, landing some heavy leather to cause a mouse to form around the right eye of Rightmire. The unofficial scorecard has the bout very close on points at the midway point, favoring Rightmire (58-57). Hoshino, the aggressor throughout most of the fight, connects with a big cross in the seventh round, putting Rightmire down and out. KO 7 for Hoshino, and he captures the USBA FW belt and becomes an immediate threat for the WBA title as well. Post-bout career marks: Hoshino, 24-0 (15); Rightmire, 28-9-3 (13).

May 4, 1940: To Cannes, France for another abbreviated card with the EBU MW titleholder, Marcel Cerdan, making his first title defense in over a year, facing countryman Eduoard Tenet for the belt in an all-French affair. Cerdan appears confident, having won both prior meetings with the now Post-Prime Tenet, but the “Casablanca Clouter” is coming off his first two career setbacks, including a WBA title loss. In round three, Cerdan dominates the action,decking Tenet with a sharp combination that puts the French challenger down for a count of six. Cerdan continues to dish out more punishment in round four, with Tenet showing signs of swelling around his left eye. The end comes a round later, with just three seconds left in the round and Tenet leaning helplessly against the ropes. TKO 5 for Cerdan, running his career record to 25-2-2 (19) and re-establishing his credentials as a WBA title contender. The loss leaves Tenet at 41-23-8 (9).

May 10, 1940: Next fistic action is at Havana’s Gran Stadium, and it is a twin bill featuring a pair of German fighters unable to arrange fight dates in other countries. In the first of these, LABF WW Champ Joe Legon faces EBU WW Champ Gustav Eder. First meeting of the two. Great start for the Cuban, who lands sufficient leather to cause a trace of swelling to appear around Eder’s right eye by the end of the opening stanza. Legon continues with his aggressive approach and holds a points lead (49-47, on the unofficial card) by the midway point. In the later rounds, Legon continues to push the pace, while Eder is content to remain outside. The bout goes the distance, and it’s a split decision, with Legon taking the SD 10 (94-96, 96-94, 97-93) to improve his career record to 24-1-6 (11). The loss leaves Eder at 34-9-9 (9). Then, in the second co-feature, it’s #1 HW contender and ex-WBA Champ, Max Schmeling, taking on Buddy Baer, Max’s younger brother. Good action bout, with the two of them mixing it up for the first three rounds, with Baer doing well and holding his own. Then, in round four, Schmeling rips a hook to the head that staggers Baer, forcing him to cover up. Huge round for Schmeling, who finishes matters with a big shot that puts Baer down and out a round later. KO 5 for Schmeling. Post-bout career marks: Schmeling, 51-6-1 (35); Baer, 20-5-1 (13).

May 11, 1940: Next card is at Montreal’s Forum. Headliner matches veteran Canadian LH Charley Belanger with Bob Oiin in a 10-round, non-title affair. Belanger has won both prior meetings, and both are at Post-Prime for this, their third encounter. Belanger, who has lost his last four, comes out firing and, early in round two, drops a straight right on the chin of Olin that forces the American fighter to cover up. Olin battles back by the midway point, and it is a relatively close contest (48-47 for Belanger, according to the unofficial card) at the halfway point. Big round seven for Olin results in some minor swelling to appear around both eyes of Belanger. The bout turns into a slugfest in round eight, with Belanger getting there first, landing a big cross that decks Olin, who cannot beat the count. KO 8 for Belanger, who improves to 43-22 (20) with the win. Olin drops to 33-17-3 (10) with the loss.

May 11, 1940: Big fight night in Chicago, culminating in a WBA title bout but commencing with a notable debut for one Ray Robinson, a hugely touted WW prospect. In a scheduled four-rounder, the 19-year-old Robinson seizes control from the opening bell, and finishes his man with a big shot early in the second round. KO 2 for Robinson, who impressed in less than four minutes of ring action. The next featured bout is for the USBA WW title, recently vacated by Jimmy Garrison, who stepped up to claim the NABF belt. Former WBA WW Champ Eddie Dolan and Izzy Jannazzo – both ranked among the top five WWs -- vie for the vacant title. Jannazzo, who has yet to win a title, is the hungrier and more aggressive of the two through the early rounds, and he forges a solid points edge (59-55, according to the unofficial card) at the midway point. By the end of round seven, Dolan is finally on target with some good shots, producing some redness under the left eye of Jannazzo. The swelling worsens as the bout heads into the later rounds, but Dolan is unable to take full advantage. No cuts or knockdowns, so the bout goes the distance with Jannazzo lifting the belt via a MD 12 (116-112, 114-114, 116-112) – an impressive win for Izzy over the former Champ. Post-bout career marks: Jannazzo, 30-4-1 (13); Dolan, 31-7-4 (13). Finally, in the main event, with Henry Armstrong finally being persuaded to relinquish the WBA LW title (he’s since claimed the WBA WW belt and is even challenging for the MW title, which would be a record fourth WBA title), it’s a matchup of ex-Champ Tony Canzoneri and current NABF LW Champ Lou Ambers, the #1 ranked contender, for the vacant WBA LW title. It will be “the Herkimer Hurricane” versus “the Roman Warrior,” with the two having fought to a draw in one prior meeting. Despite being at Post-Prime career status, Canzoneri proves to still be in shape, moving inside and taking charge in the third round of action. Slight points edge to Canzoneri (48-47, on the unofficial card) after the first five rounds are in the books. Ambers digs in in the middle rounds and begins to have more success, winning rounds eight through ten. With five rounds remaining, the unofficial card has Ambers ahead on points (97-94). A late surge from Canzoneri enables him to capture the final three rounds and overcome any deficit to re-claim the crown via a UD 15 verdict (145-140, 144-142, 143-142). The win improves Canzoneri’s career stats to an impressive 51-5-4 (17). For Ambers, his third career loss drops him to 31-3-1 (18). Would be a fight-of-the-year candidate except for the fact that there was very little action in terms of decisive punching as neither man was in danger of being knocked out or knocked down given the defense-first posture of both boxers.

May 17, 1940: Friday night “Fights Down Under” card at Sydney, Australia. Filipino OPBF BW Champion Little Pancho headlines the card, taking on his EBU counterpart, Spaniard Baltazar Sangchili, in a non-title affair. First meeting of these two regional Champs. Solid boxing effort from the Filipino, who is the more accurate puncher, and the now Post-Prime Sangchili finds it difficult to keep up with the quick pace set by Pancho. One difficult moment in round five, when Sangchili manages to bloody Pancho’s nose. Nonetheless, Pancho has racked up a solid points lead (50-45 on the unofficial card) at the halfway point of the bout. Despite the cut, Little Pancho remains firmly in control through the final bell. Solid boxing effort from Pancho who takes a one-sided UD 10 (99-91, 98-92, 98-92) to run his career totals to 39-9-5 (9). The loser, Sangchili, will return to his native Spain, having fallen to 34-13 (19).
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Old 05-23-2017, 02:10 PM   #1257
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May 1940 - Part 2 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the second half of May 1940, encompassing a total of 60 bouts. Only WBA title bout is included in this report.

May 18, 1940: Next card takes place at Washington, DC’s Uline Arena. Featured is a non-title bout matching MW contender Freddy Apostoli, “the Boxing Bellhop,” who takes on LABF MW Champ Kid Tunero in a 10-round, non-title contest. First meeting of the two, Apostoli is on the comeback trail, coming in with a recent win after an early 1940 loss to one-time WBA MW Champ Holman Williams; Tunero has won his last three since his last loss, in 1939, to EBU MW Champ Marcel Cerdan. Not much in the way of action until round five, when Apostoli drops Tunero who takes a two-count before arising and covering up to last the round. Solid points edge for Apostoli (49-45) at the midway point, according to the unofficial scorer. Tunero battles back to make the bout a close one, with Apostoli sitting on the lead and becoming perhaps too passive. This enables Tunero to steal a SD 10 (95-94, 94-95, 95-94) by taking the final two rounds. Post-bout career marks: Tunero, 32-9-5 (10); Apostoli, 23-6-1 (20).

May 18, 1940: New Orleans is the venue for the next fistic action. An NABF BW title matchup tops the card, preceded by a co-feature involving two veteran, battle-scarred FWs: Battling Battalino and Pete DeGrasse. Fourth meeting of the two, with each having one win, one loss and one draw. “Bat” holds the early lead in punches landed, and he forges a sizable points lead (49-46, on the unofficial card) by the midway point. DeGrasse manages to keep the bout reasonably close, but Battalino manages to escape with a MD 10 win (96-94, 95-95, 96-94) to run his career record to 42-13-2 (15). The loss drops DeGrasse to 38-18-4 (10). Then, in the main event, the vacant NABF BW title (recently vacated by newly-crowned WBA Champion K. O. Morgan) is on the line, with LABF Champ Sixto Escobar matched with Pete Sanstol. Both men are coming off two successive losses, and Escobar won their only prior meeting. Near the end of the opening stanza, a Sanstol hook finds the target, hurting Escobar, who covers up to last the round. Escobar moves inside in an effort to become more aggressive in round three. By the midway point, Sanstol appears to have matter well in command (his points lead is 59-55, according to the unofficial observer at ringside. Escobar continues to press forward in the later rounds, but he is unable to break through Sanstol’s defenses. Solid UD 12 win for Sanstol (118-111, 117-111, 117-111) who lifts the belt. Post-bout career marks: Sanstol, 39-13-5 (9); Escobar, 31-9-3 (10).

May 24, 1940: Next is a Friday night card at Mexico City. Solid twin bill of feature bouts, headlined by an NABF title bout showcasing the talents of the very popular Mexican fighter, Baby Arizmendi. In the first co-feature, a non-title affair, two top 10 LWs lock horns as Tony Chavez takes on Laurie Stevens. First meeting of the two. First blood is drawn (literally) in round four, when Chavez rips open a cut over the right eye of Stevens. By the midway point, a round later, there is noticeable swelling under the injured eye, and Chavez holds a narrow points lead (48-47) at the midway point, according to the unofficial card. Stevens bounces back to drop Chavez for a six-count in round six, but it goes to no avail as the cut is re-opened and, with the bleeding uncontrollable, Chavez is declared the winner via a TKO 7 on the cuts stoppage. This result pushes Chavez’s career record to 29-8-2 (12), while Stevens drops to 26-7-1 (19) with the loss. Then, in the main event, popular Baby Arizmendi defends his NABF FW title against a familiar foe, Cuban Filio Julian Echevarria, who is the reigning LABF FW Champ. Huge edge to Arizmendi (4-1) in five prior meetings; their most recent encounter, in 1937, ended in a controversial DQ win for Arizmendi. Solid start for Arizmendi, who seems energized in front of a very appreciative hometown crowd. By the end of the fifth round, there is noticeable swelling around the left eye of the challenger. Arizmendi has forged a solid points lead (60-55, according to the unofficial card) by the midway point, and he exhibits superior stamina as the bout heads into the later rounds. Echevarria does mount a minor rally with a big round nine, causing some swelling to appear around the left eye of Arizmendi. But the Mexican Champ regains control, pounding out a solid if unspectacular UD 12 win (119-110, 118-111, 119-110) in a bout with no cuts or knockdowns. Post-bout career marks: Arizmendi, 41-9-2 (10); Echevarria, 36-14-4 (12). Arizmendi’s connections are now angling to set up a WBA title shot later in 1940 as the Mexican is now the #1 contender.

May 25, 1940: Next card is back in the UK at the Earls Court in London. A couple of Flyweight bouts top the agenda. In the main support, the Fighting Jockey,” Jimmy Gill, faces “the Rose of San Jose,: newly crowned USBA Fly Champ Jackie Jurich. It is a 10-round, non-title affair as the visiting American faces a pro-Gill, hostile crowd. Both men have had some recent success, with Gill winning four of his last five, while Jurich has recorded three wins and a draw in his last four. Nothing much happening until round five, when Jurich decks Gill with a solid combination. Slight points edge for the American (48-47, on the unofficial card) at the halfway point. In round six, Gill sustains a cut over his right eye. The cut proves serious enough to result in a late stoppage when it is reopened in round nine. TKO 9 for Jurich on the cuts stoppage, improving his career totals to 18-3-1 (15). Not much in the way of protest from Gill’s corner, as his man was losing the bout anyway; post-fight, he slips to 26-7-3 (10). In the feature, the EBU Flyweight title is on the line, as Jackie Brown (who still holds the GBU Flyweight belt) defends against French challenger Valentin Angelmann. First meeting of the two, and it is Brown’s third EBU title defense. After a big round four for Brown, Angelmann goes on the offensive, ripping open a gash over the left eye of Brown. A pair of KDs in round five swing the bout in the Frenchman’s favor, and he leads by a narrow margin (56-55, on the unofficial card) at the midway point. Then end comes in round nine when the cut is reopened, and the bleeding is uncontrollable. TKO 9 for Angelmann, who becomes the new EBU Fly Champ. Post-bout career totals: 36-18-1 (13) for Angelmann, who is now pursuing a WBA title shot; 37-15-5 (12) for Brown, who is lobbying for a rematch but also has the GBU Fly title to fall back on.

May 25, 1940: Big fight night at Seattle’s Sicks Stadium, featuring a clash of two WBA Champions and a NABF title bout as the main co-feature. In the first of these, the NABF HW title is at stake as Roscoe Toles defends versus Lee Ramage. The two fought to a draw in a prior meeting. This time the bout devolves into a defensive struggle, with the early points lead going to Toles (who has a 59-57 margin at the midway point, according to the unofficial scorer at ringside). Toles almost has Ramage out on his feet in round nine, doing enough damage to cause some major swelling under the right eye of the challenger. Solid performance by Toles, who goes on to record a fairly lopsided UD 12 win (119-112, 118-114, 119-111) as Ramage offered little, particularly in the later rounds. Post-bout career marks: Toles, 32-6-3 (6); Ramage, 34-11-1 (11). Toles’ connections are now looking for a shot at Joe Louis’ WBA HW title. In the feature, hometown favorite Freddie Steele, the “Tacoma Assassin,” makes the sixth defense of his WBA MW title, facing the formidable “Homicide Hank” Henry Armstrong, the reigning WBA WW titleholder, who is seeking a record fourth WBA title after previously winning the FW and LW belts in addition to the WW one. After a couple of close opening rounds, Steele moves inside in round three, and two-thirds of the way through the round, he connects with a hook to the head that sends Armstrong reeling against the ropes. The challenger is able to cover up, remain upright and last the round without further damage. Then, in round five, with both men throwing caution to the wind and locking horns on the inside, Steele again finds the target, first with a hook to the body, then an unanswered four-punch combination followed by a huge cross. Again, Armstrong is reeling and vulnerable, so the ref steps in and calls a halt. It goes down as a TKO 5 for Steele, despite howls of protest from Armstrong’s corner. Impressive win for Steele to lift his career totals to 47-6-1 (31). The loss leaves Armstrong at 32-4-3 (26), but he still has the WW title, having abandoned the LW belt earlier in the year. Of course, it’s hard to rule out another crack at the MW crown as well …

May 31, 1940: Friday night card at New York’s St. Nicholas Arena. Topping the agenda is a USBA LH title matchup, featuring Al Gainer in his first title defense against the formidable ex-Champ, Tiger Jack Fox. Fox holds a prior win, via a TKO, that date backs to 1935, for this same title belt. This time around, Fox seems off his regular form, and Gainer takes full advantage, landing a big shot early in round four that causes Fox to cover up. Gainer’s killer instinct kicks in, and he manages to deck Fox with a huge combination about two-thirds of the way through the round. Fox is unable to beat the count, and Gainer is a KO 4 winner. Post-bout career totals: Gainer, 28-7-1 (18); Fox, 47-6-1 (33). Possible “Upset of the Year” candidate as Fox was the heavy favorite of most pundits.
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Old 06-15-2017, 04:12 PM   #1258
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June 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of June 1940, encompassing a total of 54 bouts. Only WBA title bout is included in this report.

Jun. 1, 1940: The month kicks off with a solid card at Atlantic City, but no title bouts. Ex-WBA LH Champ “Slapsie Maxie” Rosenbloom, now at Post-Prime career stage, is on the comeback trail, and he puts his #2 contender ranking on the line as he faces Melio Bettina. It is the first meeting of the two, and Rosenbloom demonstrates his boxing skills have not diminished all that much as he piles up a lead in the punches landed stats in the early rounds. However, by the midway point, this has only translated to a narrow one-point lead (48-47), this according to the unofficial scorer at ringside. In the second half of the bout, Bettina steps up the pace, becoming more and more aggressive. Rosenbloom is content to retreat into a defensive shell for the last few rounds, and he is lucky to escape with a SD 10 win (93-96, 95-94, 95-94), despite losing a point in round nine for repeated low blows. It is a landmark 50th career win for Maxie, and only Bettina’s fourth setback of his still young career. Post-bout career marks: Rosenbloom, 50-13-6 (18); Bettina, 24-4-2 (11).

Jun. 7, 1940: A huge throng has gathered for a WBA FW title bout at Havana’s Gran Stadium, featuring the “Cuban Bon Bon,” Kid Chocolate, in action defending that belt against challenger Mike Belloise. The two met once before, back in 1936, and Chocolate took a comfortable points win, but now he is at Post-Prime career stage, and Belloise feels he has a good chance of dethroning the Champ, even here before a boisterous hometown crowd. Chocolate seems a bit off, and Belloise takes advantage, dominating the early action with a strong round two. After five, the unofficial scorer has the challenger with a points edge (49-46) and, with the Cuban fans urging him on, Chocolate responds by becoming more aggressive. Solid defense from Belloise, and by the ninth round, there is a trace of swelling around the left eye of the Champ. Even larger points lead for Belloise (99-91 on the unofficial card) after ten. Both men tire badly in the later rounds, with any hope of Chocolate retaining the title being extinguished. The scorecards are read, and Belloise becomes the new WBA FW Champion via a UD 15 (145-140, 144-141, 144-141) to run his career totals to 26-9-5 (9). The loss leaves Chocolate at 39-9-7 (17).

Jun. 8, 1940: To the UK for a fight card at Liverpool, with twin bill title action headlining the agenda. First co-feature matches Benny Lynch, now at Post-Prime, with Jimmy Warnock, for Lynch’s Commonwealth Flyweight title, in the first meeting of these two. Lynch is the aggressor in the early rounds, but it is Warnock who drops Lynch with a big shot in round five. Lynch is able to struggle to his feet, barely beating the count, covering up to last the round. At the midway point, the unofficial scorer has Lynch ahead by a point (57-56). Warnock begins to show signs of fatigue as the bout heads into the later rounds. In round nine, Lynch suffers a cut over his right eye. The cut is ruled the result of an accidental butt, and it leads to an early end in round 10. The scorecards after nine are tallied, and Lynch is declared the winner via a UTD 10 (86-84, 87-83, 87-83), despite suffering the cut and the one KD. Post-bout career marks: Lynch, 32-9 (16); Warnock, 19-14-1 (10). In the nightcap, the GBU LW title is on the line, as Harry Mizler defends for the first time in almost three years, facing challenger George Daly. First meeting of the two, and it’s only the second title defense for Mizler. The bout remains close for the first three rounds before Mizler, who deftly mixes up an inside and outside attack, begins to pull ahead. In round four, he manages to rip open a gash over the right eye of Daly; the eye also begins to puff up as well. Solid points edge for Mizler (59-56 on the unofficial card) at the halfway point. IN the second half of the bout, Daly offers little resistance, as the cut over his eye bleeds intermittently, but not enough to cause a stoppage. Mizler himself sustains a cut in round 11, but it has no effect on the outcome. Solid UD 12 win for Mizler (118-111, 118-111, 117-112) who keeps the belt for awhile longer, as least until a credible challenger may emerge. The win boosts Mizler’s career record to 22-11-4 (6); Daly ends the bout at 22-11-3 (7).

Jun. 8, 1940: Chicago’s Comiskey Park is the venue for the next fistic action, which sees a pair of NABF title bouts topping the card. On the undercard, making his second pro start, is WW prospect Ray Robinson, who registers a first round KO of his TC opponent to move to 2-0 (2); Robinson has gone less than a three rounds total in his two outings thus far. Then, in the first co-feature, Jimmy “the Mud Flats Kid” Garrison puts his NABF WW title on the line, facing challenger Barney Ross, aka “the Jewel of the Ghetto.” First meeting of the two, and the first title defense for Garrison. Despite being at Post-Prime, Ross – coming off a win over Jimmy McLarnin – puts forward a stiff challenge, keeping Garrison on his toes. Slight early edge for Garrison (58-57 according to the unofficial card) at the midway point. Ross remains the aggressor, but but Garrison exhibits superior stamina and manages walk away with a UD 12 verdict (117-112, 117-112, 116-113) in a bout with no cuts or knockdowns. Post-bout career totals: 26-3-3 (2) for Garrison; 34-12-4 (11) for Ross. Second co-feature sees Tony Zale matched with Allen Matthews for Zale’s NABF MW title – in Zale’s fifth defense of that title belt. Zale, unbeaten in all his bouts since reaching Prime career stage, gets on top in the early going and holds a large points lead (60-55, according to the unofficial card) at the halfway point. Matthews manages to stage a minor rally in rounds seven and eight, landing sufficient blows to cause some initial swelling around the right eye of Zale. Zale regains control of the action, gradually wearing down his opponent, staggering Matthews with a left hook to the body in round 11, then dropping the challenger with a cross. Matthews regains his footing after taking a nine count, and the bell sounds to end the round. The bout goes to decision, and Zale takes a solid UD 12 (118-109, 116-111, 117-110) to improve his career record to 28-2 (20). The loss leaves Matthews at 30-10-3 (21). Zale remains the #1 MW contender and is still hopeful of WBA title shot in the near future.

Jun. 14, 1940: Next is a Friday night card at the Ullevi Stadium in Gothenburg. Sweden. Two non-title bouts top the card, with one former WBA Champion and two current regional Champions putting their talents on display. In the first co-feature, GBU MW Champ Jock McAvoy is paired with Solly Krieger, a rising young American fighter. First meeting of the two. Krieger proves to be the more aggressive through the opening rounds, and he holds a nice points lead (50-46 according to the unofficial card) at the midway point. Then, in round six, the ref deducts a point from Krieger for holding and hitting. This spurs a rally from McAvoy, who begins whittling away at Krieger’s points lead. In round eight, there’s more action, as McAvoy suffers a cut on his forehead, while Krieger must deal with a rapidly swelling left eye. Krieger drills McAvoy with a three-punch combo in round nine, forcing the savvy veteran to cover up to avoid further damage. The bout comes down to the final round, and a late surge from McAvoy falls just short – Krieger walks away a SD 10 winner (94-95, 95-94, 95-94). Post-bout, Krieger imprves to 32-16-1 (14), while the loss drops McAvoy to 33-15-5 (22). In the main event, ex-WBA LH Champ Billy Conn, one the comeback trail after losing his title via a controversial DQ and then falling short in a try for the NABF LH title, faces EBU LH Champ Heinz Lazek. Conn gets off to a good start, fighting effectively from the outside while Lazek is unable to break through Conn’s solid defense. Big points lead for Conn at the midway point (50-45, according to the unofficial card) and, the bout proves to be a bit of a mismatch, with Conn taking a UD 10 by a wide margin (99-91, 100-90, 100-90). Post-bout career totals: Conn, 23-3-2 (11); Lazek, 30-8 (20). Conn is still hopeful of earning a WBA title shot by the end of the year.

Jun. 15, 1940: Next fistic action is at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. Topping the card is a CBU title bout, but the main support is an interesting non-title affair matching EBU and CBU LW Champ Jack Kid Berg, the “Whitechapel Whirlwind,” with his LABF counterpart, Pedro Montanez. First meeting of the two, and Berg enters the bout riding a six-bout winning streak; Montanez, on the other hand, has just hit Post-Prime career stage. Montanez puts forth a strong effort, and but the end of round three, there is a trace of swelling around the left eye of Berg. The unofficial scorer has the bout even (47-all) at the midway point. Berg relies on his vast experience and stamina edge to begin to pile up points as the bout enters its later rounds. However, a big surprise, in round eight Berg is called for flagrant low blows and is disqualified. Montanez, the DQ-8 winner, improves to 34-8 (16). Berg falls to 44-15-5 (14) with the unexpected setback. A peek at the judges’ cards showed Berg ahead on two of three. Finally, in the feature, the Commonwealth WW title is on the line as Aussie Jack McNamee (who also holds the OPBF WW crown), faces challenger and hometown favorite, Canada’s Sammy Luftspring. McNamee dominates the action from the opening bell, hurting Luftspring with a quick hook to the head, forcing the Canadian challenger to cover up, also protecting a rapidly swelling right eye. Then, in round two, an accidental head butt rips open a gash over the right eye of McNamee. More action in round five, when a McNamee combination drops Luftspring to the canvas. A second KD follows, as an overhand right puts the Canadian challenger down a second time. Luftspring barely survives the round, and then McNamee is on target with a big shot for a third KD near the end of round eight. Again, Luftspring picks himself off the canvas but the bout is ended a few rounds later as Luftspring’s badly swollen right eye is judged in too bad a shape to allow the bout to continue – and there is little protest from Luftspring’s corner. It goes down as a TKO 11 for McNamee, who improves to 27-7 (17) with the win. Luftspring, who is at Post-Prime career stage, falls to 18-3-1 (13) with just his third career loss.

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Old 06-27-2017, 11:15 AM   #1259
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June 1940 - Part 2 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the second half of June 1940, encompassing a total of 56 bouts. Only WBA title bout is included in this report.

Jun. 15, 1940: Next is a fairly abbreviated six-bout card in Panama City. No titles at stake, but the feature showcases the talents of two-time WBA BW Champion Panama Al Brown, who is on the comeback trail, looking to set up another WBA title shot. His opponent is the lightly regarded Joesph Decico, yet to be ranked among the top 20, who proves to be a difficult opponent. In round two, Decicio sustains a cut over his right eye that only worsens as the bout wears on. In round five, some swelling appears around the cut eye, but the unofficial scorecard has the bout even (48-all), at this, the midway point. The cut becomes an issue and leads to an early stoppage a few rounds later. TKO 7 for Panama Al Brown on the cuts stoppage – not a terribly impressive outing, but it sets Panama Al up for a more interesting bout in the future. Post-bout career marks: Brown, 63-11-1 (22); Decico, 22-7-2 (9).

Jun. 21, 1940: Next up is a Friday night card at Los Angeles. Two top BW contenders square off for the USBA BW title, currently held by Georgie Pace, who is defending against challenger Lou Salica. It is Pace’s first defense of the belt he won back in the fall of 1939, and it is the third meeting of the two – with the slate standing at one win apiece. After a cautious start by both men, Salica holds a slight punches landed edge through the first half of the bout. At the midway point, the unofficial scorer at ringside has it even (57-apiece). Pace steps up the pace and scores well with a big round seven, causing some initial swelling around the right eye of the challenger. In round 10, Pace staggers Salica with a devastating hook, but the challenger remains upright. The bout remains close down to the wire, and Salica manages to lift the belt by winning the final round from a majority of the judges. SD 12 for Salica (115-114, 113-115, 115-114) – a controversial call, as many observers thought Pace deserved to retain the title. The win lifts Salica’s career totals to 26-6-1 (10). The loss leaves Pace at 24-8-2 (17).

Jun. 22, 1940: To the Far East for more fistic action at the Rizal Arena in Manila. A pair of non-title encounters headline an impressive card, with ex-WBA BW Champ Johnny King facing hometown favorite Pablo Dano in the first co-feature. It’s been over a decade since the two met previously, back in 1928, with Dano taking a UD 10 when both men were at Pre-Prime. Both are coming off recent WBA title losses to Panama Al Brown and seeking to set up a rematch or a WBA title shot in the near future with a win. Midway through the opening round, a quick hook to the head from Dano stuns the British veteran, but King remains upright, covering up to survive the round. King moves inside and becomes the aggressor, scoring well in round four. Slight edge for King (49-47 on the unofficial card) at the midway point. No cuts or KDs and the bout goes to decision, with King taking a narrow but UD 10 (97-95 on all three cards). Post-bout career marks: King, 49-6-1 (19); Dano, 37-13-5 (17). In the nightcap, another Filipino fan favorite, unbeaten Flyweight contender Little Dado takes on aging veteran Frankie Genaro in Genaro’s swansong – he’s announced his retirement after this bout. Little Dado, who won their one prior meeting in December 1939, takes charge from the outset, and he slices open a gash over the left eye of Genaro in round two. There is also noticeable swelling around the injured eye. Genaro battles back, however, and by round four, there is noticeable swelling under the left eye of Dado as well. Slight edge to Genaro on points (48-47, according to the unofficial card) at the midway point, but the aging veteran runs out of steam in the later stages, with the end result being a stoppage due to the cut over his eye. TKO 8 for Little Dado on the cuts stoppage; he remains unbeaten, boosting his career totals to 22-0 (13) as a result. Genaro wraps up a 21-year career with a record of 52-22-6 (19).

Jun. 22, 1940: Excitement is in the air as the most popular fighter on the planet, WBA HW kingpin Joe Louis, is in action in another defense of his title. In the preliminary co-feature, more HW fistic action as Jack Trammell faces Lou Nova. Trammell staggers Nova with a big shot in the opening round and, by round five, there is noticeable swelling around the left eye of Trammell. Undeterred, Trammell takes charge and dominates the action in round five, landing a couple of powerful uppercuts to force the ref to call a halt to save Nova from further punishment. TKO 5 for Trammell, who improves his career record to 28-9 (13). The loss leaves Nova at 20-5 (16). Then Joe Louis enters the ring to loud applause, and this time the challenger is Nathan Mann, who has risen in the ranks with a recent KO over aging veteran Tommy Loughran to earn a shot at Louis’ WBA HW title. Prior result ended in a TKO win for Louis, and most fight fans are predicting a repeat in this rematch. In the opening round, Louis drops Mann with an overhand right but Mann manages to cover up and last the round. Near the end of round two, Louis breaks through with a cross, and uppercut, then uses his jab effectively to put Mann in serious trouble, helpless against the ropes. The ref steps in and calls a halt as Mann appears helpless against the ropes. TKO 2 for Louis, whose career record improves to 31-1 (29) with the win – the only loss in a controversial stoppage versus Max Schmeling. The loss leaves Mann at 22-6-2 (17).

Jun. 28, 1940: Next is a Friday night card at New York City’s Madison Square Garden. Two top 10 HW contenders do battle in the co-feature which serves as the main support for an NABF title bout. Max Baer, hungry for another WBA title shot, faces another knockout artist, “Big Charley R” Charley Retzlaff in a non-title affair. Baer holds a prior win over Retzlaff, via TKO, back in 1933. This time around, Baer moves inside in round three and starts landing some heavy shots, doing enough damage to force the ref to step in to save Retzlaff from further punishment. TKO 3 for Baer for his third straight win inside the distance. Baer improves to 32-13 (28) with the win: Retzlaff drops to 33-19 (25) with the loss. In the main event, it’s a rematch as Tony Shucco faces Gus Lesnevich for Shucco’s NABF LH title belt. Shucco, who is making his third defense of the belt, took a controversial DQ decision from Lesnevich earlier in the year and agreed to a rematch. Shucco, who has won his last five outings, starts well. In round five, there is a nick under the left eye of Lesnevich. At the midway point, it is a close bout, and the unofficial scorer at ringside has Lesnevich with a slim points edge (59-58) with a couple of even rounds. By round 10, there is noticeable swelling under the right eye of Lesnevich who has been carrying the fight to Shucco. The bout goes the distance, and Shucco is fortunate to escape with a majority draw (113-115 Lesnevich, 114-114, 114-114) that enables him to retain the title – barely. Post-bout career totals: Shucco, 34-12-1 (11); Lesnevich, 28-4-0 (14).

Jun. 29, 1940: Final card of the month is at the Earls Court in London. Two title bouts top the card, first co-feature is for the GBU LH title belt, long held by Len Harvey but now belonging to Bert Gilroy, who lifted it from Harvey in an upset in late 1939. The challenger is Freddie Mills, who is still one bout short of Prime but posting an excellent record of 18-1 to earn the title shot. Huge first round for Gilroy, but Mills withstands the punishment and gradually works his way into the fight. In round five, it is Mills in control as he decks Gilroy with a hook to the head. Gilroy arises at the count of two, but the damage is done. The unofficial card has Mills with a points edge (by 58-56) at the halfway point. In the second half of the bout, Gilroy tries to become more aggressive but he just opens things up more for Mills to land some good countershots. A barrage of blows from Mills puts Gilroy down a second time in round eight; a third KD -- from a Mills uppercut -- follows a round later. However, Mills gets careless in round 11 and Gilroy decks him with a short, clean hook. Mills takes a six-count but is able to resume, covering up to last the round. In the end, the bout goes to decision, and Mills takes a UD 12 (115-111, 113-112, 115-111) although the late surge from Gilroy made the outcome quite a bit closer. With the win, Mills wraps up the Pre-Prime stage of his career at 19-1 (13) and is angling for a matchup with EBU LH titleholder Heinz Lazek. The loss drops Gilroy to 20-7-2 (14) In the final bout of the evening, the EBU FW title is at stake as Frank Parkes (who also holds the GBU FW title) defends against Frenchman Maurice Holtzer. First meeting of the two, and first defense of this belt in almost a year. Parkes lands early and often, causing a trace of swelling to appear around the right eye of Holtzer as early as round two. Holtzer, who takes some time to regroup, lands a straight right in round five that stuns Parkes, forcing the Brit to cover up. Still, it’s a solid points lead for Parkes at the midway point (59-56, according to the unofficial card). Holtzer manages to keep the bout close and, going into the final three rounds, both fighters are exhausted. Parkes seems a bit too passive, at least until the final round when he realizes he may be losing his belt. Great effort from both men, and Holtzer manages to take a SD 12 (117-112, 114-115, 115-114) despite being at Post-Prime career stage. To the dismay of the British crowd, Holtzer is crowned EBU FW Champion, improving to 42-18-4 (15) with the win. Parkes, who still has the GBU FW title, falls to 23-15-1 (14) with the loss.
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Old 07-19-2017, 05:18 PM   #1260
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July 1940 - Part 1 of 2

This report covers fistic action from the first half of July 1940, encompassing a total of 57 bouts.

July 4, 1940: Fourth of July celebrated in the States with a good fight card at the Boston Garden. Main event showcases the talents of two top HWs, as Jersey Joe Walcott faces challenger Abe Simon for Walcott’s USBA HW title. First meeting of the two, and it is Walcott’s fourth defense of ,hat belt but the first in over a year, as Walcott is on the comeback trail after losing his WBA HW title challenge to Joe Louis. Walcott is on top with a big round three, causing some swelling to appear under the left eye of Simon. In round five, Walcott breaks through and decks Simon midway through the round with a big shot. Simon arises after the count reaches five, but he is vulnerable as Walcott continues to pound away until the ref calls a halt. TKO 5 for Walcott, with the win moving Jersey Joe to 38-6 (24). For Simon, it is only his fourth career loss, leaving him at 25-4-1 (19).

July 5, 1940: Next up is a Friday night card at Vancouver’s Exhibition Gardens. In the main event, Canada’s Lou Brouillard – coming off an unsuccessful challenge for the WBA MW title -- defends his Commonwealth MW title against newly crowned OPBF MW Champ, Aussie Fred Henneberry. In the opening round, Brouillard wastes little time, dropping Henneberry with a cross. Solid points lead for Brouillard at the midway point (58-55 on the unofficial card), and the Canadian punctuates his dominance with a second KD in round seven. Only in the final round does Brouillard begin to show his age (now at Post-Prime career stage) where he falls victim to a Henneberry combination and goes down, arising after taking a count of eight. Still, enough of a margin from the earlier rounds enable Brouillard to retain the title via a UD 12 (115-109, 114-110, 114-111). Post-bout career marks: Brouillard, 32-12-3 (14); Henneberry, 30-14-2 (12).

July 6, 1940: Next fistic action takes place at the Sports Palace in Rome. Main event matches ex-WBA Flyweight Champ Midget Wolgast, now in the twilight of his career, against long-time contender and former EBU Fly Champ Istvan Enekes, the Hungarian who has made Rome his home base throughout his career. The two met for the WBA title two years previously, with Wolgast winning, but back then the American was still in his Prime, so some hope for a better result in the Enekes camp. Early punches landed edge favors Wolgast in this 10-round, non-title affair. By the midway point, the unofficial scorer at ringside has Wolgast ahead (49-47). However, in the later rounds, the stamina factor favors Enekes as Wolgast begins to tire visibly. A three round rally in rounds seven through nine is sufficient for Enekes to claim the UD 10 victory by a narrow margin (96-94 on all three cards). The win lifted Enekes’ career totals to 34-9-1 (10) compared to 50-7-1 (18) post-fight for the aging Wolgast.

July 12, 1940: Solid Friday night card in the States at Denver’s Mammoth Gardens. No titles at stake, but the main event matches two top 10 LW contenders: Tony Chavez and Wesley Ramey. Chavez is coming off a loss to Jack Kid Berg, while Ramey is rebuilding his record, coming off a pair of wins following an unsuccessful WBA title challenge. In round four, both men are cut over the right eye. The bout is even (48-all on the unofficial card) after the first five rounds. Chavez’s cut is reopened, and the bleeding becomes too difficult to control. It goes down as a TKO 7 for Ramey on the cuts stoppage. Post-bout career marks: Ramey, 31-10 (6); Chavez, 29-9-2 (12).

July 13, 1940: Next card is at Havana’s Gran Stadium, with a pair of attractive co-features topping the agenda. In the first of these, LABF MW Champ and hometown favorite, Cuba’s Kid Tunero, takes on Al Hostak, the “Savage Slav,” in a non-title affair. Hostak, who has recorded 23 knockouts and won his last four, proves to be a formidable opponent. In round one, he slices open a cut on the forehead of the Cuban Champion. The cut is re-opened in round three, and again in round six. Tunero has the edge at the midway point, at least on the unofficial scorer’s card (by 49-46). Hostak targets the cut and, when it is re-opened a third time, it leads to an immediate stoppage. TKO 9 for Hostak on the cuts stoppage, lifting his career totals to 29-4 (24). The loss leaves Tunero at 32-10-5 (10). In the feature, the LABF WW title is on the line as Joe Legon, another favorite of the Cuban fans, faces Cocoa Kid. It is Legon’s second defense, and a tough opponent as he faces the higher-rated ex-Champion. Early punches landed edge for Kid, who forges a narrow points lead at the midway point (58-56, on the unofficial card). Legon goes on the attack in the later rounds, but he is unable to mount a rally, allowing Kid to regain the belt via a UD 12 (115-112, 116-114, 115-112) to run his career totals to 37-6-4 (11). For Legon, it is only his second career loss, leaving him at 24-2-6 (11). Kid’s camp is now angling for a WBA title bout later in 1940.

July 13, 1940: A solid card at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh is next. Only bout of note is the main event, for the USBA MW title, with Holman Williams defending against challenger Ken Overlin. Williams enters the bout having won his last five, while Overlin has won his last two, with both being former WBA MW Champions, both are looking for a big win here to move back into the WBA title picture. One prior meeting, for the WBA MW title in 1937, ended in a TKO for Williams. Williams holds an early edge in punches landed, and he puts forth a solid boxing effort to pull ahead by a sizable margin (59-55, according to the unofficial card) at the halfway point. No cuts or knockdowns, at least not until round 11 when Williams drops Overlin with a big shot. Overlain bounces back up at the count of two, but the damage has been done – Williams goes on to take a lopsided UD 12 win (117-111, 119-109, 119-109) to retain the title. Post-bout marks: 32-6 (20) for Williams, who is looking for another WBA title shot; 36-6-5 (13) for Overlin.
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