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Old 11-01-2012, 06:29 PM   #61
VanillaGorilla
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Class of 1973, Hitters: Drew, Aikens

I got fired again. I'm really good at that aspect of the game. I am going to sim 30 seasons before taking over a team, again.

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Four players enter this year, two hitters and two pitchers.

-----------

Stephen Drew, not J.D., gets in as the Selection Committee goes to the leader boards for both batters entering this year.

The Committee was embroiled in a great debate on this one. It came down to Drew, who gets in because he is 9th All-Time on the triples list with 229 vs a player who would have been the first to get in on his first year of eligibility who was 9th on the slg% all-time list. That player was 8th before the 1972 season was played, and would have gotten in instead of Drew had he maintained that 8 spot.

Instead, I went to random.org, errrr.....had the Selection Committee decide.

The Saberheads wanted the slg% guy because HRs are skill and triples are luck. The traditional guys asked the Saberheads if they had recently switched from crystal meth to crack. Again, the Blue Dogs were put off by the antics of both camps.

The Blue Dogs cited a letter to the Sporting News where someone wrote something about triples being more valuable than HRs in the era Drew played (1900-1915) and went with the Traditional guys on this one.

Stephen Drew becomes the latest active player in RL to be inducted. A late 2nd rd draft pick, he gets a Phil Rizzuto induction, of sorts. Let's just say he was a good guy...Like Rizzo, he was the shortstop for a dynasty that won multiple WS titles.

Drew played in 4 WS between 1902 and 1910, and was on the winning team each time. The only other HOFer from those teams is Braggo Roth. By the time 1902 rolled around, Roth was pretty much a platoon player, so Drew was really the constant on those teams. Perhaps more like Derek Jeter than Rizzo, in some ways.

But, his offense was more like Rizzo. And Drew spent his career in Detroit.

261/312/385 npa OPS+ of 114 is his career line. There were no All Star teams for him to be on during these years.

Triples were his thing. He led the league 5 times, and led the league in slg% in 1901 with a .480 mark. He collected 1595 hits in his career.

A late second rd pick, Drew is a floor breaker, but subjectively I find him legitimate. Jeter and Rizzuto were surrounded by HOFers. Drew was not. Being the SS on 4 title teams is more meaningful than numbers in a spreadsheet, the Blue Dogs agreed.

Black Ink: 8
Gray Ink: 43
HOFm: 29
HOFs: 20 (lowest in the Hall)

ADD: With the induction of Drew the top 10 placeholders in the triples category are all in the HOF. No active players or recently retired players amongst the top 10, and all in. The top 10 players in career doubles and career stolen bases are also all in the HOF.

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Willie Aikens was somewhat surprising. I thought he would get in through the traditional method. All other players with 400 HRs in their career have gotten in. He came up short, there, but he was 43rd on the All-Time VORP list, the highest of any eligible player. The highest player on the WAR list was also at 43. Aikens was higher on the WAR list than the other player was on the VORP list, so he gets the nod.

Meshing RL and the parallel universe, for a moment....In RL he played for the Royals when a local boy named Rush worked for the team. Aikens was a big star and Rush was just a low salaried worker bee.

Years later, Rush Limbaugh was an entity worth more than than the Kansas City Royals and Willie Aikens was in prison. Limbaugh has sent letters and vouched for Mr Aikens during his legal troubles, in part, because years before Willie Aikens treated the Limbaugh kid well.

Rush Limbaugh's theme music is "My City Was Gone" by The Pretenders with the catchy hook "way...to...go...O-Hi-o". The Presidential election is just around the corner, and the eyes of the world will be looking at Ohio in a few days, and where did Aikens play his parallel universe career? All of it?? Cleveland.......gotta love it. Wishing the RL Willie all the best.

From 1948 through 1963, Aikens played in what was, generally, a ball park that heavilly favored pitchers. Gosh, I would like park adjusted OPS+ for this....but, I don't have that....what Aikens did put out was an npa OPS+ of 133 in a pitchers park. Actual OPS+ easily over 140.

In 2277 games Aikens collected 418 HRs amongst his 2108 hits. He drove in 1376 (38th) RBI while posting a slash line of 267/360/470.

In 1952 he hit .290 with 31 HRs to take the league MVP award. He never played in a WS....he was playing for Indians, after all....

Black: 4
Gray: 147
HOFm: 64.5
HOFs: 35

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Old 11-01-2012, 07:25 PM   #62
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Class of 1973, Pitchers: Kelley, Kile

The pitching inductees are alphabetical neighbors....

Harry Kelley pitched from 1924 through 1947, a span of years which covered his RL time spent in the majors. He was much more successful here.

He appeared in 731 games and won 304 and lost 249 with an OOTP ERA of 3.87 (npa ERA+ of 102).

Kelley pitched in 5 WS, winning 3 titles.

He had much better teammates here. His battery mate was Joe Torre, the best back stop to play in this league. He also had HOFers Bill White and Babe Herman scoring runs for him. Another teammate is the pitcher with the most wins who is not in the HOF...can't explain why he isn't in other than that he is perhaps getting the Clemens treatment we will see in RL, shortly.

Kelley gets in on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 6
Gray Ink: 159
HOFm: 126
HOFs: 34

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Darryl Kile enters the Hall at the age of 114...I like this world better than the real one.

Never pitching Colorado, he put up a career OOTP ERA of 2.91 (npa ERA+ of 102) and posting a career record of 282-269 from 1880 through 1897. The 76 year wait after retirement is the longest for anyone in the Hall.

He won 25 games in 1893 to win the Cy Young Award. In 1894 he won the WS pitching to HOF battery mate Bill DeLancey with HOFer Eddie Mathews at 3B.

Kile was a RL favorite of mine. I was in St Louis on June 22, 2002. This entry makes me sad.

Kile enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black: 9 (1)
Gray: 200 (82)
HOFm: 130 (31)
HOFs: 35 (12)

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Old 11-01-2012, 11:29 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanillaGorilla View Post

Darryl Kile enters the Hall at the age of 114...I like this world better than the real one.

Never pitching Colorado, he put up a career OOTP ERA of 2.91 (npa ERA+ of 102) and posting a career record of 282-269 from 1880 through 1897. The 76 year wait after retirement is the longest for anyone in the Hall.

He won 25 games in 1893 to win the Cy Young Award. In 1894 he won the WS pitching to HOF battery mate Bill DeLancey with HOFer Eddie Mathews at 3B.

Kile was a RL favorite of mine. I was in St Louis on June 22, 2002. This entry makes me sad.

Kile enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black: 9 (1)
Gray: 200 (82)
HOFm: 130 (31)
HOFs: 35 (12)
this. been following this thread the last couple days. this entry made me feel the best.
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Old 11-02-2012, 09:03 PM   #64
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Class of 1974, Pitchers: Baker

This class is the half way point between 1936 and 2012. With the three hitters and one pitcher joining, the Hall now has 116 members. If there is validity to this method, I should wind up with totals in the 4 categories that are similar to the RL HOF numbers.

At this point, the averages for each category per entrant is (RL ave 1.0 for each):

Black Ink: 1.22
Gray Ink: 1.29
HOFm: 1.60
HOFs: 0.96

Due to expansion, I expect the Black and Gray Ink to continue downward. Due to expansion and a 162 game schedule, I expect the HOFs number to go up.

The HOFm number is surprising. IRL, Stan Musial's 454 is the highest ever. Here it has been exceeded by Cobb, Shoeless Joe, Speaker, and Frank Robinson (Cobb and Jackson by a lot). I don't see this number getting close to 1.0. With 162 games and expanded play-offs, there will be more points available to be had. In a vacuum I would expect this number to go up. But with the figure sitting at 1.6, I don't see this level being maintained.

I am not certain of any of this...that is why the games are played....

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Norm Baker is another RL 19th century pitcher who was treated well by the development engine once his real data was exhausted.

A second rd draft pick in 1920, he made his debut in 1922. Retiring in 1940, he posted a career record of 231-206 (with 13 saves) and an OOTP ERA of 3.66 (npa ERA+ of 113).

Baker becomes the first pitcher to enter the Hall with more walks than strikeouts. He struck out 1339 and walked 1510. The Saberheads are having a complete tantrum over this.

In 1929, Baker won the CYA going 28-8 and posting a npa ERA+ 155 2.79 OOTP ERA. He struck out 95 and walked 104 in 328 2/3 innings.

In 1928 and 1929 he was on a Brookly Dodger team that repeated as WS champs. Fellow HOFers Babe Herman, harry Kelley, Joe Torre and Bill White were also on those teams.

Baker gets in on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 26
Gray Ink: 137
HOFm: 86
HOFs: 25

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At the halfway point the chart of the HOFer's composite cores clearly shows the new floor that has been established. An approximate dividing point is at the 70th entry. Prior to that the floor was around the 4 line. Now we see it slightly above the 2 line.

A 4 is the average score for the RL Hall. The model has, to this point, replicated the declining standards of the RL Hall.
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Old 11-02-2012, 10:50 PM   #65
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Class of 1974, Hitters: Kelly, Klein, Phillips

2 RL HOFers join this HOF in this class. In an odd oddity of oddness, 2 hitters get in alphabetically with a Kelly as happened in last year's pitching class. These two just happened to play on the same team here, also.

Two entrants come from the leader boards, but neither is a floor breaker. The floor is so low that I don't see many, if any, additional floor breakers the rest of the way.

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King Kelly was the 6th player taken in 1948 by the Brooklyn Dodgers. He retired in 1966. A 7 time All-Star and 3 time GG winner at catcher, Kelly had 2555 hits in his career. He also hit 256 HRs and stole 306 bases.

In his rookie season he went 6 for 7 in a game against the Braves. That was the first half of a doubleheader. In the night cap he went 5 for 5...12 for 13 on the day!

In his only WS appearance he, along with fellow classmate Chuck Klein, defeated a Chicago Wite Sox team that was playing in its first of four consecutive WS. There will be players from that Chicago team that will be hearing from the Hall in later years.

Kelly posted a career line of 281/346/441 for a npa OPS+ of 117.

Kelly's Gray Ink and HOFm/s numbers all exceed the Hall average.

Black Ink: 23 (23)
Gray Ink: 208 (221)
HOFm: 177.5 (64)
HOFs: 57 (45)

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The aforementioned Chuck Klein joins his teammate at the induction ceremony.

Klein enters the Hall 8th on the All-Time slg% leader board. He was 9th last year, but an active player slipped back.

Klein slugged .534 for his career. A BA of .296 and an OBP of .353 gives him a legendary npa OPS+ of 143. He slugged a career high of .620 for a career best OPS of 1.032.

As in RL, Klein clustered some amazing seasons in a short span. In 1959 he won the MVP, taking 2/3 of the triple crown (.330 ave, 116 RBI) while hitting a 4th best 39 HRs. He also scored a league best 113 runs.

The 4th pick in 1954, Klein didn't play 100 games in a season after 1963.

In this short play period he collected 1259 hits and 248 HRs in 1312 games.

Black: 21 (60)
Gray: 72 (166)
HOFm: 76 (194)
HOFs: 25 (48)

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Tony Phillips retired in 1907. His 67 year wait for the call from the Hall is the longest of any hitter. Perhaps he wasn't a very nice guy.....

Phillips was the highest eligible player on the WAR leader board.

Phillips was a second rd draft pick, but failed to sign in 1889. Taken in the first rd in 1890, he signed with the Cleveland Spiders.

He collected 2217 hits while posting a slash line of 291/373/388 that was good for a npa OPS+ of 121.

A 6 time GG winner and 5 time AS, Phillips won the 1895 MVP when he scored 115 runs and hit for a .364 average.

Playing his entire career in Cleveland meant he never played in a WS.

Black: 10 (7)
Gray: 116 (42)
HOFm: 80.5 (26)
HOFs: 42 (32)
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:19 PM   #66
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Class of 1975: Fischer, Archdeacon, Chambliss

3 hitters and no pitchers enter this year. There will be some notable pitchers, both in RL name and simulated world performance, that do not get in. Any hitter that gets left out will be a marginal candidate who's supporters will be left only with an argument comparing him to Lance Blankenship....but Blankenship saved an orphanage from burning down.

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William Fischer had a short RL career that ended with a strong year. This seems to bode well for players getting favorable treatment from the development engine when using recalc, as is in place here.

Fischer was the 8th player taken in the 1951 draft. In 1952 he played in 127 games and hit 290/334/421 (npa OPS+ 121) to win the Rookie of the Year.

In 1956 he was the league MVP for Detoit when he led the league in runs and XBH while hitting a slash line of 307/381/518 (npa OPS+ 152).

That off season he was traded to Washington in one of the worst trades in league history. Teamed with HOFer Vada Pinson, Fischer led the Sens to the title in 1957. They won the pennant in 1958, but lost to the Cubs. Losing a WS to the Cubs does not prohibit a player from entering the Hall, but a strong case can be made that it should.

A 6 time All-Star and once a GG winner, Fischer's last big league action came in 1969. For his career he collected 2558 hits, 1254 RBI, 1247 R, 295 HRs, and also stole 194 bases. He posted a career line of 279/322/425 (npa OPS+ 113). These numbers will get a catcher to Cooperstown.

Not a computer selection, Fischer does get inducted in his first year of eligibility by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 3
Gray Ink: 122
HOFm: 153.5
HOFs: 49

----------------

Back to the leader boards for the next two entries.

Maurice Archdeacon enters the Hall 9th on the all-time OBP list with a career mark of .404. Playing from 1937 through 1951, he batted .304 for his career while slugging .388 for a npa OPS+ of 123.

He walked 1002 times and collected 1813 hits which led to him scoring 1039 runs.

He played his entire career with the St Louis Browns. He was on two WS winning teams late in his career when he was a solid part time contributor.

Archdeacon played in 4 AS games.

Black: 15
Gray: 74
HOFm: 57
HOFs: 38


--------------

Chris Chambliss was not a computer selection. His BNN page shows him as a .300 career hitter with 2807 career hits. This should have triggered the default induction. However, he didn't actually hit .300......he needed 9357 ABs, so his average was actually .299989. The player page rounds up, the HOF engine does not.

Chambliss was the highest ranking hitter on the WAR list, and he is a nice selection. A 5 time All-Star, he won 10 GGs at 1B. From 1933 through 1952 he played in the big leagues.

He drove in 141 runs in 1936 to lead the league. He went to one WS, but lost while playing for the Cubs.

300/346/442, npa OPS+ 116 with 215 HRs and 1469 RBI for his career.

Black: 12 (0)
Gray: 148 (38)
HOFm: 105 (16)
HOFs: 37 (15)

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Old 11-04-2012, 03:06 PM   #67
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Class of 1976, Hitters: Griffey Jr, Zernial

Four players enter this year, 2 hitters and 2 pitchers. This is the strongest class since the inaugural class with 3 first ballot entries.

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Ken Griffey Jr, The Kid, Kid Nintendo, Junior....whatever you call him, now he is HOFer.

As the 4th pick in 1947, the Cincinnati Reds drafted the home town favorite. He played with him until he was taken by the Montreal Expos in the expansion draft prior to the 1969 season, joining Barry Larkin, there. He retired after appearing in just one game in 1970.

Griffey is among the HOF elite.

7 times he hit 50 HRs in a season with a career high of 59 in 1959. 6 times he drove in at least 150 runs in a season, both feats are unequaled.

He twice won the Triple Crown. 3 times he won a GG and he went to 13 All-Star Games.

He won 6 MVPs and a ROY.

Career numbers? He posted a career npa OPS+ of 160 with a slash line of 289/371/571. The slg% number is 2nd best all-time.

He collected 3061 hits. And BTW, he hit 829 HRs. The HR total is second best all-time. The player who is the career leader played at the same time in the NL as Griffey. That Griffey won 2 triple crowns and 6 MVPs is understating his greatness due to the competition he had.

6 times he led the league in HRs, 8 times in RBI, 5 times in R, and 2 batting titles (the triple crown years) with a career high of .361 in 1953.

His 2460 career RBI are second best all-time. His 1930 runs scored is 9th best.

In 2 WS he hit .359 with 3 HRs in 39 ABs. He won one title, in 1951.

Griffey's numbers well exceeded the Hall averages in all categories, and he gets in on the First Ballot Standard.

Black Ink: 112 (26)
Gray Ink: 326 (162)
HOFm: 455 (235)
HOFs: 74 (61)

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Gus Zernial is also a first ballot inductee. His path is unique. He was not selected by the computer, and did not make it through standard screening. When no the players on the spreadsheet met the current Hall standards, he got in by virtue of having the 8th best slg% of all time, .538. There are three active players ahead of him on the list, so he may move up on the list if they do not maintain their paces.

Zernial twice hit 50+ HRs in a season, hitting a career high of 57 in 1957 (as Griffey hit 59 in '59? As Maris hit 61 in '61 RL??).

The 10th player taken in the 1953 draft, Zernial won the ROY in 1954 for the NY Giants when he hit 36 HRs.

Once he hit the age of 30, he bounced aroung the league, changing teams 7 times.

In the 1961 WS, playing for the White Sox, he hit 3 HRs in 7 ABs in a losing effort. Following that performance, the White Sox figured it might be a good idea to use him not as a bench player, but a starter. The following season he led them to the WS again, and this time won. He hit 57 HRs in the regular season while teammate Jody Davis hit 50.

After 1962, he found himself bouncing around as a part time player, but producing whenever he got a chance. His 357 HRs ties him for 28th on the all-time list with Tommy Heinrich and fellow HOFer Brett Lawrie.

A 271/329/538 slash line gave him a 140 npa OPS+ for his career.

With nearly 30% of hits resulting in HRs, his 1291 career hits do not tell the story of his value.

I was not familiar with the RL Zernial. He passed away in January, 2011. I found some mentions of him being a good guy, so I will say that he was a good guy in this world, also, and the Hall is happy to welcome him.

Zernial is a floor breaker, but the Hall Standards are going up with the induction of this class. His metrics here are very close to RL.

Black: 8 (8)
Gray: 70 (58)
HOFm: 64 (28)
HOFs: 21 (18)

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Old 11-04-2012, 07:25 PM   #68
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Class of 1976, Pitchers: Grove, Keefe

Grove is in the conversation of best pitcher ever IRL. He is in the conversation here, also. A first ballot entry on the First Ballot Standard, Grove posted a 9.76 composite. No pitcher other than Original Inductee Charles Ferguson has a higher composite.

Drafted first over all in 1950 by the Cardinals, he retired following the 1970 season having spent his entire career with them.

He won 357 games and lost 253 for a win% of .605, 4th best amongst HOFers.

He won 8 Cy Young Awards. The most anyone else has won is 6.

He retired as the career strikeout leader with 4722. He enters the Hall 2nd on that list.

From 1953 through 1957 he led the league in wins, each season.

From 1951 through 1959, he led the league in strikeouts each season.

He won WS titles in 1954 and 1955 with fellow HOFers Daisy Davis, Keith Hernandez and Roger Repoz.

The only thing human about his resume is that in 6 WS he was 2-6 with 5 no decisions.

He had a career OOTP ERA of 3.13 (npa ERA+ 123) and a K/BB ratio of almost 3. His HOFs number is the highest of any HOF pitcher.

Black Ink: 111 (111)
Gray Ink: 336 (319)
HOFm: 353 (232)
HOFs: 82 (62)

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Had he retired in 1970, Tim Keefe would have gotten in on the First Ballot standard. Instead, he was passed over when the standards were higher, but finds his way in with class of '76 as a very worthy entry.

A second rd draft pick in 1909, he waited a year to break in with the big league club, in 1911. He won the Rookie of the Year and the CYA by going 25-8 witn an OOTP ERA of 2.05 (npa ERA+ of 151).

He pitched until he was 45 and retired following the 1932 season with 299 wins against 268 losses and an OOTP ERA of 2.82 (npa ERA+ 116).

Pitching in a low strikeout era, he racked up 2619 Ks in 5238 IP.

He appeared in 4 WS, but came up short, each time. He went 3-5 in 10 WS starts, but posted an ERA+ of 260 in those games.

Black: 41 (58)
Gray: 280 (245)
HOFm:169 (271)
HOFs: 50 (70)

The Ink numbers here and in RL are remarkably close for both Keefe and Grove.

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Old 11-04-2012, 08:24 PM   #69
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Hall Chart at 40

I know I just posted a chart from 1974, but this year is illustrative to compare the first class with 1976. The first 5 plots are the original class. The last 4 (furthest t the right) are 1976, the strongest class since the first one.

I made a very swaggy comment some time back that players with composite scores of 10 or above are once in a decade players. With 97 seasons played, the Hall has 9 players that have a composite score of 10 or better. I like it when I swag on target.
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Old 11-05-2012, 06:41 PM   #70
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Class of 1977: Bostock, Davis, Ayers

The league has reached the Seattle/Toronto expansion and FA/Arbitration years. More player movement might increase some entrant's HOFm/s scores as they reach a point giving milestone. I hadn't thought of this previously. If there is an impact, however small, it reflects the RL environment and should not impact the final totals when compared to RL.

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Lyman Bostock is one of my favorite players to use in historical games. He always has been. A "what might have been" player if there ever was one.

By all accounts he was a really really good guy. Wrong place, wrong time, RL is done. Welcome to the cornfield, Lyman!

Bostock was drafted by the Athletics, the team I had been managing, but they fired me. I kept a closer tab on how their seasons progressed than others. And I followed Bostock from his ROY Award season of 1956 until he retired in 1971.

Bostock was drafted 8th in 1955. He hit 17 HRs and collected 199 hits while posting a slash line of 337/397/497 for a npa OPS+ of 152.

He finished his career with a .304 BA, .366 OBP, and .441 slg and 2395 hits. His npa OPS+ for his career was a solid HOF 134.

He drove in 100 runs or more 3 times, which was a bit surprising. That he scored 100 runs in each of those seasons, plus 2 others, was not surprising.

He led the league in hits 4 times and won 3 batting titles.

A 6 time All-Star, Bostock won a GG and in 1956 won a WS in his only post season appearance. HOF Pedro Martinez was a 40 yo teammate that season, but Bostock was the star.

Bostock was inducted by the default settings, but he did not get in on the First Ballot screening. However, he does get into the Hall in his first year of eligibility on the basis of his Black Ink numbers being above the Hall average.

If I was playing favorites with the Hall inductions, I would have been very partial to Lyman. But he needed no outside help from me, his numbers are legitimate HOF totals.

Black Ink: 39
Gray Ink: 167
HOFm: 122.5
HOFs: 33

----------------

Willie Davis, like Bostock, was entered by the software's default settings. And like Bostock, he didn't get in on the First Ballot screening, but when he was checked with the normal standard (standard standard??) he also becomes enshrined in his first year of eligibility.

Willie Davis hit 169 triples in his career, leading the legue 6 times (htting a career high 21 in 1962). He does not get in because of his placement on the all-time triples list, he is 34th, there. What is notable is that there is no player in the top 100 that started his career in 1952, or later, except for Davis.

Davis was the 4th over all player taken by the Brooklyn Dodgers (nice) in the 1951 draft.

He won 5 GGs in CF and went to 5 All Star Games.

In 1958 he batted .338 to win the NL batting title. It was his best year from an OPS+ standpoint (npa 162 from obp/slg 381/589).

He batted .300 for his career and also hit 296 HRs.

Also like Bostock, he went to one WS and won. He was helped by fellow HOF teammates King Kelly and Chuck Klein.

Davis gets in by virtue of his HOFs number being above the league average.

Black: 22 (2)
Gray: 181 (64)
HOFm: 107.5 (50)
HOFs: 51 (28)

-------------------

Doc Ayers had a nice career, here. He won 246 games. He was an 8 time All Star. The first overall pick in 1937. ROY winner. However, the selection committee has driven itself to drink heavily from all the acrimony amongst the camps.

Ayers lost more games (251) than he won, and walked more (2016) than he struck out (1757). Yet the committee uses the Veteran Standard to induct him. Ayers must have provided some really good hooch for the committee members.

This is a head scratcher.

Black: 11
Gray: 115
HOFm: 95
HOFs: 23

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Old 11-06-2012, 04:00 PM   #71
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Class of 1978: Mays, Brown

One hitter and one pitcher enter this year.

Willie Mays was taken as the 8th player in the 1945 draft by the Cardinals. He played his entire career there, and retired in 1972.

He played more games than any player in league history, 3697. He also had the most ABs, 13723. He is the third player to collect 4000 hits (4108) and enters the Hall 3rd on that list.

A contemporary of Ken Griffey Jr, these seasons were a Golden Age for baseball and CFers. Battling each other for individual and team titles provided an era of greatness.

Having two CFers in the same league and both reaching the 'once in a decade' composite score of 10+ for their careers is just neat.

Mays is the All-Time HR king, having hit 885. He hit 3 HRs in a game 4 times, more than anyone else. He is also the only player to hit 4 HRs in a game.

He is also the career RBI leader (2513). His career TB total of 7597 is more than 600 more than Ty Cobb, who is second on that list.

He hit 50 Hrs in a season 5 times and holds the single season RBI mark of 168.

He won three triple crowns, which is even more amazing when it is considered that Ken Griffey Jr picked up 2 Triple Crowns of his own in the same league during his playing days.

He appeared in more All Star games (19) than anyone.

He won 4 MVPs and 6 GGs (again, battling Griffey for these trophies).

In 6 WS he hit 12 HRs, and took home two titles. This figure of 12 is the highest I have seen, but I haven't been able to find a place in OOTP where career WS totals are displayed. The back to back title teams in '54 and '55 also featured HOFers Daisy Davis, Lefty Grove, Keith Hernandez, and Roger Repoz.....tough roster.

Willie, Speaker, and The Kid...the best CFers in this league. (ADD: OK, Cobb was good, too, but he played about 40% of his games in RF. His name doesn't fit the melody nicely, either).

Mays enters on the First Ballot screening. ADD: His career slash line of 299/378/554 was good for a npa OPS+ of 159.

Black Ink: 112 (57)
Gray Ink: 445 (337)
HOFm: 519.5 (376)
HOFs: 79 (76)



--------------

Kevin Brown was the 4th player selected in the 1929 draft. He spent his entire career with the team that picked him, the Cleveland Indians. Amazingly, playing his entire career for the Tribe, he did win a WS. That team also featured HOFers Ty Cobb and Rusty Staub....catchy sounding pair of OFers...Cobb-n-Staub.....

He did not win the ROY in 1930, but his team won the WS, and he was certainly a strong candidate for ROY, going 18-9. His npa ERA+ of 97 and OOTP ERA of 4.73 turned off some of the voters, but it was a start to a career that culminates in a deserving HOF induction.

He becomes the first .500 pitcher in the HOF....316-316. His career OOTP ERA of 3.36 is good for a fine career npa ERA+ of 114 (which would robably be a pa ERA+ of about 105).

In 1945 he won the CYA by going 21-15 with a npa ERA+ of 147 from an OOTP ERA of 254.

He pitched 43 shutouts (18th) and was named to 7 AS teams. He also picked up 2 GGs along the way.

Brown's Gray Ink exceeds the HOF average.

His RL numbers are just short of getting him in based on the standards used here. I don't think he will get any nudge to induction because of treating the media members well....

Black: 38 (19)
Gray: 249 (166)
HOFm: 159 (93)
HOFs: 38 (41)

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Old 11-07-2012, 03:57 AM   #72
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Class of 1979: Cano, Daulton

A bit of a surprise for me, here. I thought I had a for sure player from the spreadsheet entering in Darren Daulton. Robinson Cano was sorted higher on the list and was screened first and he got in, to my pleasant surprise (less work for me). When I got down to Daulton, his numbers came up short. No one else from the spreadsheet met the standards, so I went to the WAR/VORP lists, and Dautlon was the highest on either that was eligible. The reason he was the highest is because Cano was already entered into the Hall.

So, with this class we have the highest eligible VORP candidate in Daulton, and the highest eligible WAR candidate, in Cano.

------------

Though Robinson Cano was the highest eligible player on either the WAR or VORP list, he gets in because his HOFm number was higher than the Hall average. This number can be sneaky because of huge binuses available to middle IFers and Cs for playing time, GGs, and post season play. I believe Cano is the first player to enter on the basis of HOFm number, and that number only.

He becomes the SIXTH member of the WS winning St Louis teams of 1954-55 to be inducted (Willie Mays, Daisy Davis, Keith Hernandez, Lefty Grove, and Roger Repoz being the others).

Taken late in the first rd of the 1953 draft, Cano turned out to be quite a steal. 5 times he hit .300 or better, and he collected 200 hits in a season 3 times.

He had an off year in 1963, but bounced back in 1964. From 1957-1964 (except for 1963) he was an All Star and a Gold Glove winner at second base, each year.

He played in 2514 games before his 1971 retirement. He collected 2801 hits and 384 HRs in his career.

He hit .318 in 36 post season games and connected for 9 HRs in those games.

A career line of 282/320/428 was good for a npa OPS+ of 111.

He ranks 2nd on the all time HR list for second basemen and 3rd in hits.

Black Ink: 12
Gray Ink: 132
HOFm: 169.5
HOFs: 45

---------------------

Darren Daulton hit 412 HRs in a career spanning from 1953-1971, all as a catcher (4th for Cs).

He was named to 10 All Star teams and won 4 GGs.

Taken as the second player over all in the 1952 draft, Daulton hit 31 HRs for the NY Giants to win ROY honors.

Traded to the Angels in the middle of the 1962 season, Daulton established club records in power categories there. His 39 HRs in 1964 is still the club mark. His HR totals from 1963 through 1966 are the 4 best in club history. After the mid June trade in 1962, he hit 24 HRs for the Angels that season, 6th best for an Angel for a season.

He collected 1780 hits in his career. While that only yielded him a .244 career BA, his npa OPS+ number of 131 came from the 1211 walks he drew (.353 OBP) and his slg% of 468.

His only post season appearance came in the 1969 play-offs where his Angels lost to a Yankee team on its way to its second straight WS.

Black: 8 (4)
Gray: 99 (22)
HOFm: 151 (25)
HOFs: 45 (30)
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Old 11-08-2012, 12:40 PM   #73
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Class of 1980: Menke, Lum, Sexton

The tensions between the camps in the selection committee reached a tipping point. The Blue Dogs, sick and tired of the pompous cacophony emanating from the Traditionalists and Saberheads, took charge.

All three entrants came from the leader boards.

------------------

The Blue Dogs told the leaders of of the Traditionalists and Saberheads to shut up about all of their theoretical nonsense, and pulled support from members of each camp who had grown ashamed of their leadership and strong armed Denis Menke into the Hall. The Blue Dogs flipped off both camps by saying that Menke deserves induction because he had struck out more times than any other eligible candidate, and if he wasn't inducted, no one would be.

Denis Menke did strike out 1723 times, 4th on the All Time list, behind Willie Mays in the third position. But Menke was a very good player and is deserving of induction, but the Blue Dogs were making a point to the others by flexing their counter intuitive muscles. Enough voters from the other camps saw through the Blue Dog grandstanding on agreed with selection.

Menke played 2002 games at SS, 14th All-Time. He also played an additional 1000+ games at 2B and 3B in a career that started as a 9th over all pick in the 1951 draft.

He collected 2580 hits in 2902 games (also 14th) and posted a career slash line of 252/344/382 for a npa OPS+ of 106.

He made 8 All Star teams and played in 2 WS, winning with the Giants in 1965. He is the first player from this team to be enshrined, but he won't be the only one.

His best offensive season, from npa OPS+ standpoint, was in 1961 when he hit .275 with 27 HRs and scored 103 runs while posting a 133 npa OPS+.

Menke illustrates how important eras, or even specific seasons can be in influencing raw stats. In 1968 he had an OPS of .655 which was a npa OPS+ of 107. In 1970 he had an OPS of .739 which was also an npa OPS+ of 107.

Black Ink: 6 (0)
Gray Ink: 91 (11)
HOFm: 85 (10)
HOFs: 47 (18)

-----------------

Mike Lum enters on the basis of being the highest ranked eligible player on either the VORP or WAR lists. He is the only floor breaker in this class.

Mike Lum was a 3rd rd draft pick in 1920. He retired following the 1938 season having played his entire career with the Boston Red Sox.

6 times he hit over .300 and he ended his career with a .299 batting average and 2038 career hits. A .368 OBP and .441 slg% gives him a career npa OPS+ of 120.

A 3 time GG winner, Lum made one All Star appearance. He won 2 WS in three tries. In his rookie 1922 season, he contributed a .310 average as he and fellow HOF teammates Benny Kauff and Bret Saberhagen brought the title to Boston. In 1931 Mike Sirotka joined the Lum, Kauf, Saberhagen core as the Red Sox won, again.

Black: 12
Gray: 82
HOFm: 52
HOFs: 30

------------------------

Tom Sexton was also part of the Blue Dog flip off as they argued to the other camps that he deserved entry because now that Menke was in, Sexton had the most strikeouts of any hitter eligible but not in the Hall. While this is true, Sexton was an overlooked entry since he became eligible in 1977, literally.

Sexton's retirement was overlooked in 1971. He was on the spread sheet, but since he had been noted as retired, he didn't get consideration. I have back-up mechanisms for screening because there is a human element here. He would have been put into consideration eventually, but he just had not been, yet.

Sexton has the numbers to be in the HOF through standard standards. The Blue Dogs recognized this, but still chose to make the argument to the others that his strikeouts were the reason they wanted him in.

Sexton was the 7th player taken in the 1948 draft. IRL he only has data from 1884 (something about OOTP loving to develop these 1884 players).

He finished his career here with 2747 hits. His 2787 GP at SS are the mos ever. He also has the most walks as a SS, 1624, in the history of the league.

He was a teammate of Ken Griffey Jr in 1951 when they brought a WS title to Cincinnati.

A 5 time AS, Sexton won 2 GGs at SS as he posted a career slash line of 273/336/333 for a npa OPS+ of 101.

Though the Blue Dogs did pull him from the All Time strikeout list, Sexton's HOFm/s numbers are both above the current Hall averages.

Black: 24
Gray: 102
HOFm: 180
HOFs: 48

ADD: When I conceived of the model, I debated whether or not to include negative stat leaders (strikeouts, caught stealing for hitters, walks, losses for pitchers) as categories for consideration when going to the leader boards for entries. I decided to use them because the RL leaders in these categories are in the HOF. They are a result of playing a long time. I thought it would be a way of getting people in that slipped through cracks of the method, itself. As it turns out, in the case of Sexton, by using the strikeout list it captured a candidate that slipped through the cracks due to the imperfect human administration (me) of the model. Lum is the floor breaker, but he came from the WAR list, obviously a positive stat. The least statisticlly deserving entry, Lance Blankenship, came from the BB list. At this point, I think keeping the negative stat lists in play is desirable.

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Old 11-09-2012, 06:39 PM   #74
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Class of 1981: York, Root

Rudy York joked about the controversy surrounding the strikeout totals of the previous class inductees. The reason being that with 2365, York has the most strikeouts in league history.

However, York also hit 509 HRs, 9th All-Time. As a catcher he hit 360, 5th most.

Drafted by the Braves, but not signing in 1953, York was again drafted by the Braves in 1954 with the 9th pick in the first rd. He wound up playing his entire career with the team.

A 6 time All Star, York won 3 Gold Gloves at catcher to go along with his power hitting. He had 1667 RBI in his career that ended after the 1971 season. His career npa OPS+ of 111 comes from a slash line of 244/312/433.

Twice he hit over 40 HRs and 4 times drove in 100 or more runs in a season.

He didn't fare well in the postseason. He went 0 for 16 in 2 post season appearances.

York enters on the basis of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Using the standards for traditional entry in this Hall, York would be a HOFer IRL.

Black: 1 (14)
Gray: 95 (145)
HOFm: 149 (68)
HOFs: 56 (28)

-------------------------

Charlie Root gets the call from the Selection Committee and enters on the Veteran Standard.

Root was the 12th player taken in the draft in in 1931 by the Pirates. He stayed with them his entire career until he retired in 1951.

He won 276 games vs 273 losses. He posted an OOTP ERA of 3.88 for an OPS+ of 104. Twice he led the league in wins. In 1932 he led the league in saves, with 10.

He made no post season appearances.

Black: 20 (12)
Gray: 228 (171)
HOFm: 113 (64)
HOFs: 31 (28)
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:50 PM   #75
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The Hall Chart at 35

The mean composite score is now at 5.04. Rounding the composite scores to the nearest whole number results in both a median and modal average of 4. The mean will continue to decline because the once in a decade players will come around, well, once in a decade.

The chart has an interesting display. At approximately the 65th entry we see pretty much the same pattern on either side of that point, except that the plots on the right side are about a point and a half lower.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:48 PM   #76
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Class of 1982: O'Neill, Canseco, Guillen

All three entries came from the leader boards. Two are first ballot entries. Two are floor breakers. The composite average falls below 5.0 with this class.

-------------

Paul O'Neill is both a first ballot entrant and a floor breaker, the first such induction.

O'Neill was a second rd draft pick by the Pirates in 1958. His rookie season he batted .291 with 29 HRs to win Rookie of the Year honors. Retiring after the 1976 season, he collected 2151 hits and 360 HRs and posted a slash line of 279/355/461 for a npa OPS+ of 137.

He hit 40 HRs in both 1966 and 1967, leading the league in slg% in 1966 with a .581 mark for a career best npa OPS+ of 168.

A 4 time All-Star, O'Neill won 5 GGs in RF. He appeared in post seasons, but did not win a WS.

O'Neill is a RL favorite of mine. He is a player who meant more to the game and his teams than plain numbers. If I had a vote, I would have been among the 2.2% that put his name on the ballot. I am glad to see him in here.

O'Neill was the highest placing eligible player on either the VORP or WAR lists. He is inducted on that basis.

Black Ink: 5 (4)
Gray Ink: 72 (45)
HOFm: 43.5 (71)
HOFs: 34 (37)

-----------

Jose Canseco also gets in on his first year of eligibility. His numbers were short of getting him in on First Ballot screening or the standard standard, but when the selection process went to the leader boards, his 557 HRs placed him sixth on the All-Time list, so he gets in via that route.

The ninth overall pick by the Pirates in 1957, he was team mates with fellow classmate Paul o'Neill through the 1966 season before being traded to the Cubs for Arky Vaughan.

Canseco collected 2034 hits and 1501 RBI before retiring in 1976. He was ROY in 1958, giving the Pirates consecutive winners of that award (O'Neill), when he hit .280 with 42 HRs and 122 RBI while posting a npa OPS+ of 137.

His career npa OPS+ was the same 137, from a slash line of 255/306/502...the same npa OPS+ of fellow teammate/classmate O'Neill.

His post season output was but a 1 for 11 in the LCS for the Cubs.

A 7 time All Star, Canseco won 4 GGs in his career. Using the standard standard of entry for this Hall, Canseco would be inducted IRL.

Black: 20 (15)
Gray: 158 (93)
HOFm: 155.5 (103)
HOFs: 40 (39)

--------------------------

72 years after retirement, Carlos Guillen gets the call from the Hall. The longest wait of any hitter. He gave his induction speech at the age of 108.

Guillen was a second rd draft pick in 1894, and he retired following the 1910 season.

He won 9 Gold Gloves at SS and collected 1973 hits in the Dead Ball Era.

In 1896 his Chicago White Sox team which included fellow HOFers Dave Parker and John Romano won the WS.

Guillen had a career npa OPS+ of 108.

Guillen was the highest ranked eligible player on the WAR list, tied with a player on the VORP list. The Saberheads won the argument and got the fine fielding Guillen into the HOF over the big hitting defensive liability on the VORP list.

Guillen is a floor breaker.

Black: 3
Gray: 102
HOFm: 59
HOFs: 27

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Old 11-10-2012, 10:05 PM   #77
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Class of 1983: Grich, Hamilton, Newhouser

Bobby Grich makes the HOF on his first year of eligibility. He was a software selection, but did not make it on the First Ballot screening. His HOFm/s both exceeded the Hall average, so he gets in.

The power hitting defensive specialist IRL played to form here. He collected 450 HRs, 17th most all-time, and the most ever by a second baseman.

He won consecutive AL MVPs in 1960 and 1961, the years Roger Maris won, IRL. His best offensive season came in 1971 when he hit a career best 44 HRs and posted a slash line of 311/405/573 for a npa OPS+ of 183. The reason he didn't win the MVP that year? Someone was busy topping the Maris RL single season HR mark.

Grich appeared in 12 AS games and won 12 GGs. His Oriole teams won consecutive WS in 1959-60 where Grich played with HOFer Bobby Mathews (who posted 41 RS wins, those two years).

Grich put together a stunning OPS+ for a middle infielder, career npa 140, from a slash line of 271/367/460. He collected 2648 hits, drove in 1559, and scored 1498 times.

Grich was the 5th player taken in the 1957 draft and retired in 1977.

Black Ink: 13 (8)
Gray Ink: 146 (40)
HOFm: 216 (42)
HOFs: 57 (32)

-----------------------

Billy Hamilton was not entered by the software on the default settings, but he gets in as a first ballot entrant with both of his Ink totals besting the Hall average.

Drafted 2nd overall in 1959 by the White Sox, he played his entire career on the South Side. He collected 2410 hits and drew 1667 walks, 6th All-Time, and the most by any eligible player not already in the Hall.

He stole 729 bases while being caught only 340 times. A career line of 282/401/371 gives him a npa OPS+ of 127.

A 6 time All Star, Hamilton won 3 GGs and consecutive WS in 1962-63 with fellow HOFer Gus Zernial.

Black: 38 (43)
Gray: 137 (133)
HOFm: 90.5 (154)
HOFs: 39 (31)

----------------

Hal Newhouser was the 4th pick of the draft in 1913. He did not come to terms with the Cardinals, and the next year the Cubs picked him with the first overall selection. Newhouser never appeared in a WS...that'll learn ya.

Posting a record of 229-195 for his career, Newhouser collected 22 saves in his career, the most of any HOFer.

His career OOTP ERA of 3.88 is good for a npa ERA+ of 105. In 1924 he led the league in wins (21) while pitching for a 5th place Cubs team. He led the league in strikeouts each year from 1918 through 1921.

Newhouser enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black: 29 (47)
Gray: 158 (180)
HOFm: 70 (140)
HOFs: 28 (34)
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Old 11-11-2012, 08:59 AM   #78
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Class of 1984, Part 1 - DiMaggio, Warner

Five players, 4 hitters and 1 pitcher, get in this year.

-----------

DiMaggio may be the best baseball name, ever. There is a royal essence that comes with it. And a royal baseball family, as well.

There is a tactile pleasure pronouncing the name out loud. It's a great name for fans of baseball to say. No matter how many bleacher beers you have had, you still pronounce it correctly. It's wonderfully slur-proof.

Joe DiMaggio was the greatest of the brothers D, and the Joltin' One joins this happy Hall in the cornfields. Answer to Paul Simon's question: just outside of Dyersville.

Joe DiMaggio was drafted 7th over all by, who else but, the Yankees, in 1955. Instead of retiring a Yankee, he signed as a Free Agent with the Cubs in 1977. The Cubs finished 28 games under .500. Should have known! That was his last ML action.

In a career that, in the regular season at least, was more spectacular than RL, Joe collected 3459 hits (11th), 593 HRs (6th), and 1921 RBI (8th).

He won one HR title and 2 batting crowns. In 1963, in addition to a batting title he won the league MVP (331/404/582, npa OPS+ 195). Only 6 players have posted a better WAR total for a season than Dimaggio's 11.23 from that 1963 season.

A career slash line of 280/349/484 generated a npa OPS+ of 139. a 14 time All Star, DiMaggio won 7 GGs in CF.

He never won a WS, though he appeared in 2 of them.

DiMaggio is a first ballot inductee entered on the First Ballot screening given to all who meet the software default requirements for induction meaning his Ink and HOF composites were both over the current Hall average.

Black Ink: 30 (34)
Gray Ink: 268 (226)
HoFm: 226 (260)
HoFs: 64 (58)

-----------------

Jackie Warner. "Who?" I asked when he received his computer induction. That I didn't know a part time player who played in 1966, and 1966 only won't have me losing any sleep. However, in this reality, he is immortalized in the Hall of Fame. And this isn't some fluke right place at the right time on the right leader board induction.

Jackie Warner was a third rd pick of the St Louis Cardinals in 1957. He played with them until he retired following the 1977 season.

He collected 2802 hits and 427 HRs and retired with a .303 BA. His npa OPS+ for his career is 136.

Warner was an 8 time All-Star and won 3 GGs in RF.

In 1962 he hit .346 in a 7 game WS defeat to the White Sox of HOFers Billy Hamilton and Gus Zernial. That was the closest he came to winning a title.

From 1962-1967 he collected 200 hits each season. He had one other 200 hit season and batted .300 or better 12 times, winning a batting title in 1965.

Warner's HOFm/s numbers both exceed the Hall average.

Black: 23
Gray: 170
HOFm: 207
HOFs: 48

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Old 11-11-2012, 04:12 PM   #79
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Class of 1984, Part 2- Post, Crawford, Walsh

Wally Post enters the Hall 8th on the career HR list with 538. This is the highest slot of any eligible player on any leader board, and is why the selection committee inducts him.

How cool is this? On BBRef Post's most similar player is fellow HOFer (here) Gus Zernial. The parallel realities mingle.....

Post was the 14th player taken overall in 1947 by the St Louis Browns. He remained with the organization his entire career and retired as a Baltimore Oriole in 1971.

He collected 2141 hits and 1545 RBI with a career slash line of 247/301/479 for a nap OPS+ of 119.

In 1950 he reached the 40 HR plateau in only 367 AB as he posted a career best OPS of 1.036.

Post won WS in 1948, 1950, 1959, and 1960. Maurice Archdeacon was on the early squads, Bobby Grich on the later, and Bobby Mathews contributed to both.

Black Ink: 6 (1)
Gray Ink: 112 (36)
HOFm: 90 (14)
HOFs: 33 (16)

-----------------------

Back to the WAR/VORP lists, and once again the no fielding slugger on the VORP list is tied with the slick fielder on the WAR list. Saberheads win again as Willie Crawford gets the call.

Picked in the middle of the first rd by the Cardinals in 1909, Crawford played in St Louis until he retired in 1925.

In 1918 he led the league in WAR when he collected 30 doubles, 20 triples, and a 323/379/469 line for a npa OPS+ of 163.

A career .302 hitter, his obp/slg numbers of 374/414 for his career give him a npa OPS+ of 130.

The 7 tme GG winner as a corner OFer collected 1946 hits.

Crawford is a floor breaker (a lot more of these than I expected when I commented a few classes back).

Black: 0 (0)
Gray: 101 (0)
HOFm: 41 (4)
HOFs: 27 (12)


------------------

Ed Walsh completes the RL HOF book ends of this class.

The 2nd player taken in the 1907 draft, he played his entire career with the Giants and won 2 WS in 1920 and 1921 with fellow HOFers Buddy Bell, Gabby Hartnet and Denard Span.

He posted a career mark of 214-212 with an OOTP ERA of 2.54 (npa ERA+ 115).

In 1916 he led the league in ERA with a 1.84 mark (npa ERA+ 150).

Walsh enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black: 17 (67)
Gray: 202 (148)
HOFm: 72 (147)
HOFs: 34 (62)

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Old 11-12-2012, 05:46 PM   #80
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Class of 1985, Hitters: Sisler, Blessitt, Buckner

3 hitters and a pitcher join with this class.

--------------

George Sisler had a career packed with incredible seasons early on, then a substantial drop off, just as IRL (function of recalc, here).

How incredible? From 1967 to 1970 he won FOUR consecutive MVPs. He led the league in hits, each of those seasons (as well as the 2 prior).

He won the batting title each of those four seasons.

He also led the league in SB twice.

The fourth player taken in the 1964 draft, Sisler collected 2194 career hits. from his first year through 1971 he collected at least 200 hits a year, except in the pitching dominated 1968 where he got 196.

In 1968 he posted his highest npa OPS+ number, 200. His OPS for that season was .961. In 1970 he posted his highest OPS total, 1.052, for a npa OPS+ of 190.

330/375/483 for his career is good for a 149 npa OPS+.

Sisler never played in a WS, and only made one post season appearance.

A 6 time All-Star, Sisler also won ROY honors.

He gets in on his first year of eligibility on the First Ballot Screening given to those inducted by the program's default settings.

Black Ink: 52 (29)
Gray Ink: 157 (198)
HOFm: 201.5 (200)
HOFs: 38 (44)

-----------------------

As little as I felt bad about knowing Jackie Warner, I feel even less so about not being familiar with Ike Blessitt. The sponsor of his BBRef page makes a cup o' coffee reference. Indeed. 4 games, 5 PAs, no hits, 2 Ks as a 22 year-old in 1972.....and here he becomes a first ballot HOFer.

He was not entered by the software, but his HOFs number exceeded the Hall average, so he gets in. Welcome!

Blessitt was a third rd draft pick in 1959. He retired following the 1979 season with 2288 hits and 351 HRs. His career slash line of 273/370/451 is good for a npa OPS+ of 136.

A 6 time All-Star, he hit a career high 40 HRs in 1965. In 1970 he posted his best npa OPS+ number of 165 by slashing 333/438/527.

He won a WS with the Giants in that 1965 season as a team mate of HOFer Denis Menke.

He also got a ring with the Indians in 1979, but did not make any regualar or post season game appearances that year.

Blessitt won a GG in RF.



Black: 13
Gray: 104
HOFm: 74
HOFs: 48

----------------

Bill Buckner is a childhood favorite and seeing him enter this HOF makes me smile. He was a much better player than he ever got credit for being, and certainly a man who contributed more to the game than a WS miscue.

The 12th player selected in the 1924 draft, Buckner collected 2955 hits before retiring in 1951.

Not a big favorite of the Saberheads because he rarely walked (295/323/422, here) he also VERY rarely struck out. In 10022 career ABs, Buckner fell on strikes just 182 times.

He hit 585 doubles in his career, 11th All-Time. 2 other eligible players were also 11th on their leader board list, but the selection committee chose Buckner from them.

He won the only WS in which he appeared, in 1937 with the Washington Senators. Previous inductee Al S Smith was on that team.

Buckner won 4 GGs (all in LF) and appeared in 2 ASGs.

Black: 5 (9)
Gray: 112 (94)
HOFm: 78 (70)
HOFs: 37 (26)

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 11-12-2012 at 05:49 PM.
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