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Old 06-21-2018, 07:37 PM   #741
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The one on the left is actually dan_kite2.fg and the one on the right is dan_kite1.fg
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Old 06-22-2018, 11:23 PM   #742
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This one, I have no idea what happened. Steven Williams was the Orioles' 24th-round pick in 1987, out of Crescent City (FL) and made progress through the system: a year at Bluefield, a year at Erie, and by 1990 he'd reached full-season A ball, with Wausau in the Midwest League. His stats there were nothing amazing, but hardly awful (7-9, 4.16; 106/48 K/W ratio), and he'd started to make the transition to full-time starting, this being the first year the majority of his appearances hadn't come out of the pen. Still only 21 years old, and a lefty to boot, it seemed likely there would be more to Steve's story.

And yet…one relief appearance for Frederick in '91, and that was the end of that. I assume an injury, but I couldn't find any further info.

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Old 06-23-2018, 01:10 AM   #743
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Originally Posted by Amazin69 View Post
This one, I have no idea what happened. Steven Williams was the Orioles' 24th-round pick in 1987, out of Crescent City (FL) and made progress through the system: a year at Bluefield, a year at Erie, and by 1990 he'd reached full-season A ball, with Wausau in the Midwest League. His stats there were nothing amazing, but hardly awful (7-9, 4.16; 106/48 K/W ratio), and he'd started to make the transition to full-time starting, this being the first year the majority of his appearances hadn't come out of the pen. Still only 21 years old, and a lefty to boot, it seemed likely there would be more to Steve's story.

And yet…one relief appearance for Frederick in '91, and that was the end of that. I assume an injury, but I couldn't find any further info.

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Old 06-23-2018, 03:18 AM   #744
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Brian Stone was a three-year star at Division II University of New Haven, leading the Chargers to the D-II College World Series all three seasons he was there, and earning (D-II) All-America honors as a junior. Taken by the Brewers in the 5th round of the 1986 draft, he skipped his senior season to turn pro.

He had trouble keeping his ERA down during his three seasons moving up the Brewers' chain, and when his walk totals started to balloon at Stockton in 1988 (8.0 W/9), Milwaukee apparently lost interest. Not sure if he was released or traded, but 1989 saw Stone in the Cardinal chain, at Savannah in the Sally League. Where he promptly got back into form, working largely out of the bullpen and posting both a career-best 2.59 ERA and a career-best 10.5 K/9 rate.

Before Stone knew it, he was a AA Arkansas Traveler to finish out 1989, but he was already being dogged by arm pains, and could only average a hair over 5 IP in his nine AA starts. 1990 was more of the same, as Stone pitched through the pain at Arkansas (3.21 ERA) and even earned a brief call up to AAA Louisville, but he could only manage 4+ IP/appearance, making 6 starts and a relief appearance for less than 30 innings at Arkansas. Eventually his arm issue was diagnosed as a torn labrum and after a couple of futile attempts at Arkansas in 1991, Brian was cut loose, with no other takers.

So, yeah, he's in the U of NH Hall of Fame, but when it came to his pro career, the busted labrum made Brian sink like a Stone.

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Old 06-23-2018, 05:00 AM   #745
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Brian Stone was a three-year star at Division II University of New Haven, leading the Chargers to the D-II College World Series all three seasons he was there, and earning (D-II) All-America honors as a junior. Taken by the Brewers in the 5th round of the 1986 draft, he skipped his senior season to turn pro.

He had trouble keeping his ERA down during his three seasons moving up the Brewers' chain, and when his walk totals started to balloon at Stockton in 1988 (8.0 W/9), Milwaukee apparently lost interest. Not sure if he was released or traded, but 1989 saw Stone in the Cardinal chain, at Savannah in the Sally League. Where he promptly got back into form, working largely out of the bullpen and posting both a career-best 2.59 ERA and a career-best 10.5 K/9 rate.

Before Stone knew it, he was a AA Arkansas Traveler to finish out 1989, but he was already being dogged by arm pains, and could only average a hair over 5 IP in his nine AA starts. 1990 was more of the same, as Stone pitched through the pain at Arkansas (3.21 ERA) and even earned a brief call up to AAA Louisville, but he could only manage 4+ IP/appearance, making 6 starts and a relief appearance for less than 30 innings at Arkansas. Eventually his arm issue was diagnosed as a torn labrum and after a couple of futile attempts at Arkansas in 1991, Brian was cut loose, with no other takers.

So, yeah, he's in the U of NH Hall of Fame, but when it came to his pro career, the busted labrum made Brian sink like a Stone.

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Had a feeling "sink like a stone" was coming....
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Old 06-23-2018, 08:49 PM   #746
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Everybody Must Get Stone-d!!

Quote:
Had a feeling "sink like a stone" was coming....
Well, as the saying goes, "there's a reason it's a classic."

Anyway, don't throw rocks at me, but I've got another "Stone" fellow for you. Eric Stone (not to be confused with Brian Stone's son, Eric Stone, who pitched for Boston College from 2012-2015 but has no pro career) was a righty from Parsons, KS who put in two years at Seminole State in Florida before transferring to the University of Texas. After one year as a Longhorn, he was drafted by the Rangers in the 43rd round of the 1987 draft, but chose not to sign.

Returning to UT, Stone became the ace of the staff, running his record to 15-1 before dropping his last two decisions. This bumped him up 37 rounds in the 1988 draft, with the Tigers taking him in the 6th round.

His first half-season at Fayetteville was forgettable (0-5, 5.47 in seven starts) but he was apparently on a very tight pitch count after the long college season (18.2 innings in the seven outings) and so couldn't have qualified for any wins even if the Generals were in front. Given the winter off and bumped up to Lakeland in the Florida State League for 1989, Stone looked more polished (5-9, 3.56 in 25 starts, k/9 up to 7.0) and earned an invitation to spring training the following year. (Likely as an NRI, but still.)

By this time, Stone had cracked the Top 10 of Baseball America's list of the Top 10 Prospects in the Detroit chain (headed by Rico Brogna, Travis Fryman and Scott Aldred; at #8, Stone slotted in between Phll Clark and Rob Richie) and at Tigers camp he impressed Sparky Anderson, who used him for two innings to close out Detroit's first win of the spring season. He didn't make the big team, but he was only sent down as far as Toledo, two steps above where he'd been last season and a quick drive up I-75 if he was needed.

He wasn't because, frankly, being a Mud Hen was too high a jump, too soon. While Stone's main stats stayed roughly the same (2-4, 3.79) and he kept the K/9 up at 7.2, he had now lost the strike zone and was walking 7.8/9. After 7 starts, he spent the bulk of the season in the bullpen.

Baseball America wasn't ready to give up on Stone for 1991, merely dropping him one notch to #9 in their Tiger Prospects list. The Tigers thought that sending him to AA London (the step they'd skipped by rushing him the year before) would be the stepping-stone to get Eric back on the path to the big time. But his six starts in London were rocky, to say the least. Stone went 1-5, 5.74, yielding 26 hits and 25 walks in only 26.2 IP. And only 10 strikeouts to go along with those walks, at that.

This pretty much killed his Tigers career, stone-cold. Detroit sent him to Cleveland on July 8th, as the PTBNL for their acquisition of Steve Cummings, back on May 21. (This, incidentally, was part of a long "tree" of Tribe Transactions, going back to the drafting of Jerry Dybzinski and forward for decades to come.) Cleveland figured dropping Stone even farther was called for, and Stone was able to find solid ground again at A-ball Columbus, going 1-3, 2.94 in 9 starts, and getting his K/W ratio sorted out again. (37/19).

For 1992, the Tribe tried Stone at A+ Kinston, and moved him to the bullpen. His ERA went up to 4.05, but his K/9 zoomed to 11.9, as Stone was really chucking it now. However, the walks were rising again, back up to 6.3/9. Still, Cleveland thought Stone had done enough to earn a second shot at AA, and moved him up to Canton-Akron for '93.

He kept the ERA down to 3.05, but he was nibbling all over the place (17 walks in 22.2 innings, with only 15 strikeouts) and after 13 relief appearances like that, the Tribe decided that, even if they were the Cleveland Indians, even they didn't need pitchers who were hopeless above A-ball. And they cut him, placing the headstone on his career's grave.

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Old 06-24-2018, 01:13 AM   #747
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazin69 View Post
Well, as the saying goes, "there's a reason it's a classic."

Anyway, don't throw rocks at me, but I've got another "Stone" fellow for you. Eric Stone (not to be confused with Brian Stone's son, Eric Stone, who pitched for Boston College from 2012-2015 but has no pro career) was a righty from Parsons, KS who put in two years at Seminole State in Florida before transferring to the University of Texas. After one year as a Longhorn, he was drafted by the Rangers in the 43rd round of the 1987 draft, but chose not to sign.

Returning to UT, Stone became the ace of the staff, running his record to 15-1 before dropping his last two decisions. This bumped him up 37 rounds in the 1988 draft, with the Tigers taking him in the 6th round.

His first half-season at Fayetteville was forgettable (0-5, 5.47 in seven starts) but he was apparently on a very tight pitch count after the long college season (18.2 innings in the seven outings) and so couldn't have qualified for any wins even if the Generals were in front. Given the winter off and bumped up to Lakeland in the Florida State League for 1989, Stone looked more polished (5-9, 3.56 in 25 starts, k/9 up to 7.0) and earned an invitation to spring training the following year. (Likely as an NRI, but still.)

By this time, Stone had cracked the Top 10 of Baseball America's list of the Top 10 Prospects in the Detroit chain (headed by Rico Brogna, Travis Fryman and Scott Aldred; at #8, Stone slotted in between Phll Clark and Rob Richie) and at Tigers camp he impressed Sparky Anderson, who used him for two innings to close out Detroit's first win of the spring season. He didn't make the big team, but he was only sent down as far as Toledo, two steps above where he'd been last season and a quick drive up I-75 if he was needed.

He wasn't because, frankly, being a Mud Hen was too high a jump, too soon. While Stone's main stats stayed roughly the same (2-4, 3.79) and he kept the K/9 up at 7.2, he had now lost the strike zone and was walking 7.8/9. After 7 starts, he spent the bulk of the season in the bullpen.

Baseball America wasn't ready to give up on Stone for 1991, merely dropping him one notch to #9 in their Tiger Prospects list. The Tigers thought that sending him to AA London (the step they'd skipped by rushing him the year before) would be the stepping-stone to get Eric back on the path to the big time. But his six starts in London were rocky, to say the least. Stone went 1-5, 5.74, yielding 26 hits and 25 walks in only 26.2 IP. And only 10 strikeouts to go along with those walks, at that.

This pretty much killed his Tigers career, stone-cold. Detroit sent him to Cleveland on July 8th, as the PTBNL for their acquisition of Steve Cummings, back on May 21. (This, incidentally, was part of a long "tree" of Tribe Transactions, going back to the drafting of Jerry Dybzinski and forward for decades to come.) Cleveland figured dropping Stone even farther was called for, and Stone was able to find solid ground again at A-ball Columbus, going 1-3, 2.94 in 9 starts, and getting his K/W ratio sorted out again. (37/19).

For 1992, the Tribe tried Stone at A+ Kinston, and moved him to the bullpen. His ERA went up to 4.05, but his K/9 zoomed to 11.9, as Stone was really chucking it now. However, the walks were rising again, back up to 6.3/9. Still, Cleveland thought Stone had done enough to earn a second shot at AA, and moved him up to Canton-Akron for '93.

He kept the ERA down to 3.05, but he was nibbling all over the place (17 walks in 22.2 innings, with only 15 strikeouts) and after 13 relief appearances like that, the Tribe decided that, even if they were the Cleveland Indians, even they didn't need pitchers who were hopeless above A-ball. And they cut him, placing the headstone on his career's grave.

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Stone -
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Old 06-24-2018, 07:38 PM   #748
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When the pitchers come home to Roost.

In 1988, Doug "the Red Rooster" Rader, former manager of the Rangers (and for two games, interim manager of the White Sox), was scouting for the Angels while hoping for another shot at a top job. One of the reports he filed was on Jason Doss, a righthanded pitcher from Fort Pierce, FL.

Rader called Doss an "average" prospect (no dis on Doss; far better to be "average" than not a prospect, after all) and noted he had a curve ball reminiscent of Don Sutton's. Rader also noted that Doss would like grow into his body as he had a strong back and torso, and he was correct, as Doss grew from 5'10, 165 lbs to an eventual 6'1", 180 lbs.

However, Rader also noted that Doss was already suffering shoulder problems as a result of being misused by his high school coach: on this occasion, Doss was too pained to start, yet was made to warm up three separate times before coming in to save the game with four innings in relief. Ouch.

Armed (pardon the pun) with knowledge of how Doss was being misused, the Angels passed on Doss, who was taken in the 23rd round by the Cubs, instead. The Cubs, logically enough, figured they knew how to take care of their young arms, regardless of what had gone before.

So they gave Doss a half-season in rookie ball and a year at Class-A Charleston (WV), moving him between starting and relief. Then, in 1990, the Cubs started Doss at Peoria (Midwest), but when he struggled (2-6, 4.64), they dropped him a half-notch to Geneva in the NY-Penn League and made him a pure starter. This seemed to help, and Doss went 3-3, 3.27 in 9 games (8 starts).

Having earned a second shot at Peoria in '91, Doss made the most of it, compiling a mark of 11-11, 3.54, with a 9.71 k/9. And while his control was never exactly pinpoint, he was keeping his walks in the 4s, and the overall 154/68 K/W stats would seem good enough.

So Doss got anohter half-step boost in 1992, to Winston Salem, where he struggled to a 4-4, 5.09 in 14 starts and…got released? I mean, he wasn't setting the league on fire, I'll give you, but his peripherals were still decent and he was only 21 years old. Perhaps the shoulder troubles came back? But he hadn't missed any time before this so it still seems premature.

(BTW, Doug Rader got the Angels job in 1989, skippered the Halos to a 91-71 finish and placed 4th in Manager of the Year voting. Then he had two sub-.500 seasons and got fired. And so it goes.)

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Old 06-24-2018, 10:06 PM   #749
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazin69 View Post
In 1988, Doug "the Red Rooster" Rader, former manager of the Rangers (and for two games, interim manager of the White Sox), was scouting for the Angels while hoping for another shot at a top job. One of the reports he filed was on Jason Doss, a righthanded pitcher from Fort Pierce, FL.

Rader called Doss an "average" prospect (no dis on Doss; far better to be "average" than not a prospect, after all) and noted he had a curve ball reminiscent of Don Sutton's. Rader also noted that Doss would like grow into his body as he had a strong back and torso, and he was correct, as Doss grew from 5'10, 165 lbs to an eventual 6'1", 180 lbs.

However, Rader also noted that Doss was already suffering shoulder problems as a result of being misused by his high school coach: on this occasion, Doss was too pained to start, yet was made to warm up three separate times before coming in to save the game with four innings in relief. Ouch.

Armed (pardon the pun) with knowledge of how Doss was being misused, the Angels passed on Doss, who was taken in the 23rd round by the Cubs, instead. The Cubs, logically enough, figured they knew how to take care of their young arms, regardless of what had gone before.

So they gave Doss a half-season in rookie ball and a year at Class-A Charleston (WV), moving him between starting and relief. Then, in 1990, the Cubs started Doss at Peoria (Midwest), but when he struggled (2-6, 4.64), they dropped him a half-notch to Geneva in the NY-Penn League and made him a pure starter. This seemed to help, and Doss went 3-3, 3.27 in 9 games (8 starts).

Having earned a second shot at Peoria in '91, Doss made the most of it, compiling a mark of 11-11, 3.54, with a 9.71 k/9. And while his control was never exactly pinpoint, he was keeping his walks in the 4s, and the overall 154/68 K/W stats would seem good enough.

So Doss got anohter half-step boost in 1992, to Winston Salem, where he struggled to a 4-4, 5.09 in 14 starts and…got released? I mean, he wasn't setting the league on fire, I'll give you, but his peripherals were still decent and he was only 21 years old. Perhaps the shoulder troubles came back? But he hadn't missed any time before this so it still seems premature.

(BTW, Doug Rader got the Angels job in 1989, skippered the Halos to a 91-71 finish and placed 4th in Manager of the Year voting. Then he had two sub-.500 seasons and got fired. And so it goes.)

Attachment 564534
I find it interesing that there are a lot of players with early success and around age 21 they are done. For every success story we have 10 of these guys.

James
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Old 06-25-2018, 06:25 PM   #750
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Clearly, he belonged in the bullpen

Bret "Braz" Davis was a star for Pearland (TX) High School, eventually (in 2005) being inducted into their Hall of Fame. Okay, so it's only a high school's Hall of Fame, but I don't see you being honored along Kirk Dressendorfer and Craig Smajstra, so…

Drafted in the 34th round by the Yankees in 1984, Braz opted to attend Baylor instead, and after three years as a Bear, he was tabbed by the Cubs in the 21st round of the 1987 draft. Rather than return for his senior season, he signed this time. Ursine loyalty?

Soon Davis was Braz-ing a path up the Cubs' chain, a year at a time. Wytheville, Charleston (WV), Peoria, Winston-Salem…his control kept improving and his WHIP kept dropping, while his strikeouts and ERA stayed good. Okay, the ERA took a small bump at Winston-Salem (at 3.73, it was the first time he'd ever been over league average) but the Cubs were impressed enough to give Davis his first in-season promotion, bringing him up to AA Charlotte to finish the year.

Where he got banged around pretty good. 1-2, 5.94 in 3 starts and relief outing, 16 hits and 14 walks in only 12.2 innings (and only 3 Ks to go with all that carnage)…not the best way to finish a season. But it shouldn't have finished his career…except that it did.

What happened? Yes, four BAD games at Charlotte, but it was his first taste of AA and it was only four games. And yes, Davis was now 25 (college years take away the time organizations are willing to invest), but he was a lefty and you'd think they'd keep getting chances. And if the Cubs didn't want him, you'd think someone else might take a flyer.

Perhaps what happened was that Davis had set his own deadlines, giving himself until a certain age to make progress towards the bigs and his AA struggles at age 25 had convinced him to return hang up his spikes? In any event, Davis settled in Corsicana TX and became a decorated firefighter. Myself, I'd rather be putting out "fires" in a relief role than fighting them for real, but perhaps that's just me.

(And sorry about that Braz-en pun. And that one, too.)

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Old 06-25-2018, 09:40 PM   #751
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazin69 View Post
Bret "Braz" Davis was a star for Pearland (TX) High School, eventually (in 2005) being inducted into their Hall of Fame. Okay, so it's only a high school's Hall of Fame, but I don't see you being honored along Kirk Dressendorfer and Craig Smajstra, so…

Drafted in the 34th round by the Yankees in 1984, Braz opted to attend Baylor instead, and after three years as a Bear, he was tabbed by the Cubs in the 21st round of the 1987 draft. Rather than return for his senior season, he signed this time. Ursine loyalty?

Soon Davis was Braz-ing a path up the Cubs' chain, a year at a time. Wytheville, Charleston (WV), Peoria, Winston-Salem…his control kept improving and his WHIP kept dropping, while his strikeouts and ERA stayed good. Okay, the ERA took a small bump at Winston-Salem (at 3.73, it was the first time he'd ever been over league average) but the Cubs were impressed enough to give Davis his first in-season promotion, bringing him up to AA Charlotte to finish the year.

Where he got banged around pretty good. 1-2, 5.94 in 3 starts and relief outing, 16 hits and 14 walks in only 12.2 innings (and only 3 Ks to go with all that carnage)…not the best way to finish a season. But it shouldn't have finished his career…except that it did.

What happened? Yes, four BAD games at Charlotte, but it was his first taste of AA and it was only four games. And yes, Davis was now 25 (college years take away the time organizations are willing to invest), but he was a lefty and you'd think they'd keep getting chances. And if the Cubs didn't want him, you'd think someone else might take a flyer.

Perhaps what happened was that Davis had set his own deadlines, giving himself until a certain age to make progress towards the bigs and his AA struggles at age 25 had convinced him to return hang up his spikes? In any event, Davis settled in Corsicana TX and became a decorated firefighter. Myself, I'd rather be putting out "fires" in a relief role than fighting them for real, but perhaps that's just me.

(And sorry about that Braz-en pun. And that one, too.)

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Old 07-01-2018, 03:30 PM   #752
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Alec Bohm??

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Old 07-01-2018, 06:47 PM   #753
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Alec Bohm: looks like he is going to be a very good player. Based on his age he will probably be brought up around 23-24 hit 10-12 dingers with decent average and around 25-27 start peaking out at about 18-25 homers, maybe around .270 average....

I am rating him based on other players that had similar stats at age 19-21 in college. Homers and average will drop a bit from college numbers, but once he gets the experience the power numbers will rise. just my opinion....
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:49 AM   #754
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The Ol' College Trey

Virginia Beach native Trey McCoy starred at Virginia Tech, being inducted into the school's Hall of Fame in 2007. As a freshman, he tied the NCAA record for grand slams (four), as a sophomore he won the conference Triple Crown, and when he left after his junior season he had the school record for batting average (.374) and was 2nd all-time in HR and RBI. His slugging percentage was still, as of 2007, the 7th-best in NCAA history.

Drafted in the 9th round by the Rangers…wait, the 9th round? Well, yeah, because while McCoy was the real McCoy at bat, in the field he was an outfielder…but not much of one. In his entire professional career, he never posted a Range Factor of 2.00 or higher during any year's work in the outfield. And this proved to not be enough Range for the Rangers.

Still, he could rake. In his initial half-season at rookie-level Butte, he posted a .357/.458/.635. And the Rangers at least gave him a shot in the outfield, playing him there 49 times, as opposed to 11 games at 1B and 8 at DH (or perhaps PH). But that "sterling" 1.31 Range Factor McCoy recorded soon had Texas rethinking this; in no other season did he play more than half of his games in the outfield.

1989 saw McCoy moved to Gastonia in the Sally League. The hitting slumped a little (.280/.377/.473 in 130 games), perhaps because McCoy was sulking about being primarily a DH (67 games, 42 OF, 21 at 1B). I have to admit, I can see the Rangers' point, given that in 42 OF games, McCoy only caught 41 fly balls and committed 8 errors. Clank!

So the Rangers sent him back to Gastonia in 1990, rather than the promotion his bat might otherwise have merited. He continued to hit (.338/.415/.563), but grew frustrated at his lack of progress and briefly retired. The Rangers lured McCoy back by promoting him to Port Charlotte in the FSL, but he struggled there (.688 OPS) and retired again.

1991 saw more frustration. The Rangers now were touting McCoy as a catcher/first baseman, despite the fact that McCoy had never caught an inning professionally, nor would he ever so do. They'd moved him up to AA Tulsa to challenge him and he rose to the occasion with a .902 OPS, despite only hitting .241. But he only played 44 games, so there may have been another retirement in there.

More struggles at Tulsa in '92 (.608 OPS) saw McCoy back in Gastonia, where he continued to devour the Sally League. (.354/.496/.657). But he only played 47 games, again. Perhaps there was an injury as well?

Finally, in 1993 it all came together, as McCoy got in a full season's work at Tulsa and led the Texas League in HR (29) and RBI (95). His .988 OPS saw him bumped up to AAA Oklahoma City for the season's final week, and he was even better at the higher level (.250/.382/.679). So the next year, he got a steady job DHing for Oklahoma City and if the numbers were only slightly less stellar (.306/.389/.521), surely they were enough to earn at least a September look-see from the big club?

Except, of course, this was 1994, and there was no September for McCoy to earn his call-up to. And the next year, the scramble for veteran free agents led to the Rangers stocking Oklahoma City with the likes of Jim Lindeman (and, later, Sam Horn) and McCoy found himself out of a job. He hooked on with his hometown Norfolk squad, but his bat had slowed and after a season or so of mostly pinch-hitting, he had washed out as a Tide, too. So he went home. Which, as noted, was only in Virginia Beach, anyway.

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Old 07-02-2018, 08:04 AM   #755
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Virginia Beach native Trey McCoy starred at Virginia Tech, being inducted into the school's Hall of Fame in 2007. As a freshman, he tied the NCAA record for grand slams (four), as a sophomore he won the conference Triple Crown, and when he left after his junior season he had the school record for batting average (.374) and was 2nd all-time in HR and RBI. His slugging percentage was still, as of 2007, the 7th-best in NCAA history.

Drafted in the 9th round by the Rangers…wait, the 9th round? Well, yeah, because while McCoy was the real McCoy at bat, in the field he was an outfielder…but not much of one. In his entire professional career, he never posted a Range Factor of 2.00 or higher during any year's work in the outfield. And this proved to not be enough Range for the Rangers.

Still, he could rake. In his initial half-season at rookie-level Butte, he posted a .357/.458/.635. And the Rangers at least gave him a shot in the outfield, playing him there 49 times, as opposed to 11 games at 1B and 8 at DH (or perhaps PH). But that "sterling" 1.31 Range Factor McCoy recorded soon had Texas rethinking this; in no other season did he play more than half of his games in the outfield.

1989 saw McCoy moved to Gastonia in the Sally League. The hitting slumped a little (.280/.377/.473 in 130 games), perhaps because McCoy was sulking about being primarily a DH (67 games, 42 OF, 21 at 1B). I have to admit, I can see the Rangers' point, given that in 42 OF games, McCoy only caught 41 fly balls and committed 8 errors. Clank!

So the Rangers sent him back to Gastonia in 1990, rather than the promotion his bat might otherwise have merited. He continued to hit (.338/.415/.563), but grew frustrated at his lack of progress and briefly retired. The Rangers lured McCoy back by promoting him to Port Charlotte in the FSL, but he struggled there (.688 OPS) and retired again.

1991 saw more frustration. The Rangers now were touting McCoy as a catcher/first baseman, despite the fact that McCoy had never caught an inning professionally, nor would he ever so do. They'd moved him up to AA Tulsa to challenge him and he rose to the occasion with a .902 OPS, despite only hitting .241. But he only played 44 games, so there may have been another retirement in there.

More struggles at Tulsa in '92 (.608 OPS) saw McCoy back in Gastonia, where he continued to devour the Sally League. (.354/.496/.657). But he only played 47 games, again. Perhaps there was an injury as well?

Finally, in 1993 it all came together, as McCoy got in a full season's work at Tulsa and led the Texas League in HR (29) and RBI (95). His .988 OPS saw him bumped up to AAA Oklahoma City for the season's final week, and he was even better at the higher level (.250/.382/.679). So the next year, he got a steady job DHing for Oklahoma City and if the numbers were only slightly less stellar (.306/.389/.521), surely they were enough to earn at least a September look-see from the big club?

Except, of course, this was 1994, and there was no September for McCoy to earn his call-up to. And the next year, the scramble for veteran free agents led to the Rangers stocking Oklahoma City with the likes of Jim Lindeman (and, later, Sam Horn) and McCoy found himself out of a job. He hooked on with his hometown Norfolk squad, but his bat had slowed and after a season or so of mostly pinch-hitting, he had washed out as a Tide, too. So he went home. Which, as noted, was only in Virginia Beach, anyway.

Attachment 566131
Here you go..

As always your bios hit me every time. Sometimes the difference of making it to the pros is just dumb luck and chance - so many players that with a few good years and a little luck would have had their dreams fulfilled.
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Old 07-02-2018, 04:31 PM   #756
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He's on a Mission?

Little information on this next one, I'm afraid.

Brian Sullivan attended Vanguard University in Costa Mesa, CA, which is affiliated with the Assemblies of God church. Perhaps they required their students to do missionary work, the way the LDS church does? Because by the time Sullivan was ready to turn pro, he was 25.

It's not surprising that he could only hook on with the independent Reno Silver Sox of the California League, and he did well enough there (6-7, 2.57; 91/33 K/W in 98 innings between the rotation and the bullpen) to have the Expos buy his contract and give him two late season starts with West Palm Beach. He found FSL hitters a more difficult task (14 hits in just 9.2 innings) but didn't walk hardly anyone, and the ERA was still just 3.72, so that at least merited another year's look.

For 1990, the Expos sent him down a half-step, to Rockford in the Midwest League, and converted him to a pure reliever. Sullivan had no problems with the switch, posting a 2-0, 2.31 out of the pen, keeping the WHIP down to 0.94, and the K/9 at 7.71. And yet, after 13 outings, his career came to an end.

Was there an injury? Did the church send him on (another?) mission? Did the Expos decide they just weren't interested in having 26-year-old relievers at A-ball, even if they were looking good and they were left-handed, to boot? Beats me.

A nephew, Danny Sullivan, was later a quarterback at Arizona State. Which is pretty irrelevant for Uncle Brian's brief baseball career, but it's all I could find, so there it is.

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Old 07-02-2018, 06:12 PM   #757
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Little information on this next one, I'm afraid.

Brian Sullivan attended Vanguard University in Costa Mesa, CA, which is affiliated with the Assemblies of God church. Perhaps they required their students to do missionary work, the way the LDS church does? Because by the time Sullivan was ready to turn pro, he was 25.

It's not surprising that he could only hook on with the independent Reno Silver Sox of the California League, and he did well enough there (6-7, 2.57; 91/33 K/W in 98 innings between the rotation and the bullpen) to have the Expos buy his contract and give him two late season starts with West Palm Beach. He found FSL hitters a more difficult task (14 hits in just 9.2 innings) but didn't walk hardly anyone, and the ERA was still just 3.72, so that at least merited another year's look.

For 1990, the Expos sent him down a half-step, to Rockford in the Midwest League, and converted him to a pure reliever. Sullivan had no problems with the switch, posting a 2-0, 2.31 out of the pen, keeping the WHIP down to 0.94, and the K/9 at 7.71. And yet, after 13 outings, his career came to an end.

Was there an injury? Did the church send him on (another?) mission? Did the Expos decide they just weren't interested in having 26-year-old relievers at A-ball, even if they were looking good and they were left-handed, to boot? Beats me.

A nephew, Danny Sullivan, was later a quarterback at Arizona State. Which is pretty irrelevant for Uncle Brian's brief baseball career, but it's all I could find, so there it is.

Attachment 566241
Here you go....
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Old 07-03-2018, 10:33 AM   #758
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Historical Facegen

Would someone please provide a historical facegen link? Many thanks!
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Old 07-04-2018, 06:42 PM   #759
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Paul Russo was a teammate of Tino Martinez at the University of Tampa, where he was Conference Player of the Year and a two-time Division II All-American. Drafted in the16th round by Minnesota in 1990, he tore up the Appalachian League in his half-season at Elizabethtown (KY), the Twins' longtime affiliate, winning the MVP and setting a franchise HR record (22) that still stands.

Perhaps Russo, described as a modern-day Paul Bunyan, had set the expectations bar too high, as he never topped that 22 HR total in any full season. But he made steady progress through the Twins' system, even with the Twins deciding to convert him from a catcher (as he'd been in college) to a 1B/3B. (My game's AI kept him behind the dish, which is probably why he made the majors so quickly…"fastest route to the majors" and all that, but the Twins were playing Scott Leius at 3B, so it's understandable they might want to develop prospects there.)

Nothing outstanding, but after an .844 OPS (and 20 HR and 100 RBI) for Kenosha (A) in 1991, a .781 (and 22 HR, again) for Orlando (AA) in '92, and an .824 at Portland (AAA) in '93, promotion would seem logical, but it didn't come. This extensive profile by Twins Daily from last August doesn't mention any injuries, but given that Russo only played 83 games for Portland.and wasn't called up, it seems likely that something had gone wrong.

Especially since the Twins dropped Russo back to AA (now Nashville) to start 1994, which doesn't make much sense unless he was rehabbing. He was frankly mediocre at AA (.701 OPS for a half-season), but I don't know if that was continued injury or the sulks or whatever. He did do better (.799) when brought back to AAA (now Salt Lake City) for the last month of the season, but of course…it was 1994, so nothing higher available.

After that, the Twins apparently decided that Russo was never going to get over the hump and cut him loose. He spent the next five years in the Padres, Yankees, and Astros chains, being a consistent AAA performer but never enough to demand promotion (never even reaching .800 OPS). And finally, the market for mediocre old first basemen ran dry. And so it goes.

Nowadays, Russo runs Hit Factory Baseball in Orlando (with his brother, Pat).

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Old 07-04-2018, 08:30 PM   #760
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Paul Russo was a teammate of Tino Martinez at the University of Tampa, where he was Conference Player of the Year and a two-time Division II All-American. Drafted in the16th round by Minnesota in 1990, he tore up the Appalachian League in his half-season at Elizabethtown (KY), the Twins' longtime affiliate, winning the MVP and setting a franchise HR record (22) that still stands.

Perhaps Russo, described as a modern-day Paul Bunyan, had set the expectations bar too high, as he never topped that 22 HR total in any full season. But he made steady progress through the Twins' system, even with the Twins deciding to convert him from a catcher (as he'd been in college) to a 1B/3B. (My game's AI kept him behind the dish, which is probably why he made the majors so quickly…"fastest route to the majors" and all that, but the Twins were playing Scott Leius at 3B, so it's understandable they might want to develop prospects there.)

Nothing outstanding, but after an .844 OPS (and 20 HR and 100 RBI) for Kenosha (A) in 1991, a .781 (and 22 HR, again) for Orlando (AA) in '92, and an .824 at Portland (AAA) in '93, promotion would seem logical, but it didn't come. This extensive profile by Twins Daily from last August doesn't mention any injuries, but given that Russo only played 83 games for Portland.and wasn't called up, it seems likely that something had gone wrong.

Especially since the Twins dropped Russo back to AA (now Nashville) to start 1994, which doesn't make much sense unless he was rehabbing. He was frankly mediocre at AA (.701 OPS for a half-season), but I don't know if that was continued injury or the sulks or whatever. He did do better (.799) when brought back to AAA (now Salt Lake City) for the last month of the season, but of course…it was 1994, so nothing higher available.

After that, the Twins apparently decided that Russo was never going to get over the hump and cut him loose. He spent the next five years in the Padres, Yankees, and Astros chains, being a consistent AAA performer but never enough to demand promotion (never even reaching .800 OPS). And finally, the market for mediocre old first basemen ran dry. And so it goes.

Nowadays, Russo runs Hit Factory Baseball in Orlando (with his brother, Pat).

Attachment 566726Attachment 566727
I used the image from kenosha, Edited tehe shadow out and for a better overall image added some "white" teeth rather than the pink in the image.
I think this turned out very well. Also added an 180x270 and 90x135 image for those that prefer photos.
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