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Old 02-20-2007, 03:08 PM   #21 (permalink)
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1968 AFL Championship: Down the Path to Super Bowl III

AFL Championship Game

Shea Stadium, Flushing, NY

New York Jets (11-3) vs. Oakland Raiders (12-2)

The defending AFL Champion Oakland Raiders again found themselves one step away from professional football's grandest stage, and this time, a brash young team was standing in their way.

Led by AFL MVP Joe Namath, the New York Jets burst onto the main AFL stage after waiting in the wings behind the Houston Oilers last season. Only the Raiders scored more points during the regular season than the Jets, and only three teams allowed fewer points to be scored. Not only that, but New York also had revenge on their minds following their last defeat of the regular season, 43-32, at the hands of these same Raiders in Week 10.

With revenge on their minds, the Jets came out quickly, marching down the field on their first possession in nine plays, covering 84 yards. Although they could not get into the end zone, a Jim Turner chip shot field goal gave the Jets the lead. Oakland would respond after a Joe Namath interception when Daryle Lamonica found Fred Biletnikoff two yards deep in the end zone for a score and a 7-3 lead. The Jets, suddenly shellshocked at the quick score, saw their chances of controlling the first half go up in smoke when they missed a field goal and then lost two fumbles to the Raiders on their next three drives. Oakland turned these mistakes into ten more points with a George Blanda field goal and a Pete Banaszak run to give them a 14 point lead at the half.

With their backs against the wall, the Jets came out swinging to start the second half. Once again, Namath looked like the MVP, driving the Jets down the field to Oakland's 8 yard line. However, New York still could not find the end zone, and Jim Turner's second field goal cut the Raider lead to 11. However, on their very next possession, Namath threw a costly interception at the Jets 22, giving Oakland excellent field position, and Lamonica made them pay, finding Warren Wells with a 12 yard touchdown pass that just about closed the lid on New York's day. Namath would be intercepted two more times in the fourth quarter trying to drive the Jets down the field, and Lamonica (14/17, 181) added his third touchdown of the day with another pass to Fred Biletnikoff late in the fourth to finish the scoring. For the second straight year, the Raiders were champions of the AFL.

Final Score: Oakland-31 New York Jets-6

Real Life Score: New York Jets-27 Oakland-23
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Old 02-20-2007, 03:51 PM   #22 (permalink)
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1968 NFL Playoffs: Down the Path to Super Bowl III

NFL Divisional Playoffs


Cleveland Browns (10-4) vs. Dallas Cowboys (12-2)
Cleveland Municipal Stadium, Cleveland, OH

For the second straight season, the Dallas Cowboys and Cleveland Browns squared off in the divisional round of the NFL playoffs, with the Cowboys looking to go to their third consecutive NFL Championship, and the Browns looking to gain a small piece of payback for their close defeat last season.

Unlike last seaon's defensive minded battle, these two teams faced off in a high scoring, high flying affair, with the winner literally coming down to who had the final possession.

Cleveland got on the board first, with a Bill Nelson touchdown pass to Eppie Barney following a Don Meredith interception. The Cowboys would answer right back on their next drive, going 85 yards in 10 plays and eating up over six minutes of clock. The drive finished with a Craig Baynham 29 yard touchdown gallop as time expired in the first quarter with the score tied at 7-7.

Dallas would take the lead midway through the second quarter, as Chuck Howley picked off a Nelson pass at midfield, and Don Perkins finished the 55 yard drive with a 12 yard touchdown sweep, putting Dallas in the lead once more. Cleveland would tie the game yet again on their next drive, as Leroy Kelly punched it in from nine yards away, making it 14 a piece with just over three minutes to play in the half. The two teams would swap field goals in that time, tying the game for the final time at 17-17.

Neither team seemed able to do much right after halftime, but on Dallas' second possession of the half, Don Meredith put together his best drive of the game, which culminated in a Bob Hayes ten yard touchdown reception that put Dallas ahead once again. Meredith's next pass did not go nearly as well, as he was intercepted, leading to a Cleveland field goal and a 4 point Dallas lead heading into the fourth quarter.

Following a punt for each team, the Browns took control of the ball at their own 33, and proceeded to march down the field more cleanly than they had all day. When Bill Nelson found Ernie Green in the end zone for an 11 yard touchdown catch, the Browns were back on top with just under seven minutes to play. After both teams again traded punts, and with backup Craig Morton in the game to spell Meredith, the Cowboys had one last chance. Morton did what Meredith could not do consistantly in the second half: lead Dallas down the field and into the end zone. Craig Baynham's second touchdown run of the day came with just 53 seconds remaining, and Cleveland could get no further than midfield, sending the Cowboys to their third consecutive NFL Championship.

Final Score: Dallas-31 Cleveland-27

Real Life Score: Cleveland-31 Dallas-20


Baltimore Colts (13-1) vs. Minnesota Vikings (8-6)
Memorial Stadium, Baltimore, MD

The powerhouse Colts had every reason to believe the Minnesota Vikings would be a pushover in their divisional playoff matchup. Baltimore had scored 120 more points than the Vikings, and Minnesota had allowed over 100 more points than the Colts. They just had no idea how easy it was going to be on this day.

After the Vikings kicked a 48 yard field goal to open the scoring, NFL MVP Earl Morrall led the Colts to 27 straight points in the first half. First came a Lou Michaels field goal in the first quarter. Then, in the second quarter came two Jerry Hill runs, from three and eleven yards, a Terry Cole eight yard run and another Michaels field goal as time expired in the first half.

Down 27-3, the Vikings could do absolutely nothing in the second half, allowing the Colts to control the ball for almost 40 minutes during the game and giving up 27 first downs as a defense. Starting quarterback Joe Kapp was replaced by Gary Cuozzo, and while he wasn't effective either, he at least got the Vikings into the end zone early in the fourth quarter. Of course, Minnesota missed the extra point, and then allowed the Colts to score three more times in the same quarter. Morrall (21-23, 304) completed a touchdown pass to Willie Richardson, then Terry Cole added his second touchdown run of the day and Tom Matte took one in from eleven yards out to end the scoring for Baltimore. The Vikings were able to get a late safety, but it was far too late to make any sort of impact.

Final Score: Baltimore-48 Minnesota-11

Real Life Score: Baltimore-24 Minnesota-14


NFL Championship Game

The Cotton Bowl, Dallas, TX

Dallas Cowboys (12-2) vs. Baltimore Colts (13-1)

The Dallas Cowboys found themselves in their third consecutive NFL Championship against possibly the best team in professional football history. Don Shula's Baltimore Colts could not only outscore any team in the NFL, they would punish them while doing it. Allowing just 10 points a game, Baltimore's defense was the finest in the league, and though it seemed like Dallas would have their hands full with the Colts, it was soon seen that this game would be the other way around.

Dallas came out with a game plan that they knew could beat the Colts if they could execute. They wanted to control the clock, wearing out Baltimore's fast defense and keeping their offense on the sidelines at the same time. In the first quarter, it worked, although neither team could score. By the time the second quarter started, Baltimore's offense was clearly frustrated, and Dallas had started to pick up large chunks of yardage against a tiring Baltimore defense. Bob Hayes found the first chink in Baltimore's armor, catching a 12 yard touchdown from Don Meredith early in the second quarter to give Dallas the lead. On their next possession, the Cowboys blew open Baltimore's defensive front, allowing Don Perkins to run almost untouched, 67 yards for another touchdown, putting Dallas ahead 14-0 heading into the half.

If the first half was just a bad dream for the Colts, the second half quickly became a nightmare. Earl Morrall, who was masterful in beating the Vikings, could not get started today, as the Dallas defense hit any Baltimore receiver with the nerve to head across the middle of the field. With their main passing avenue gone, the Colts just could not get anything going on offense, making just five first downs in the second half. Dallas added a final field goal near the end of the third quarter, and with the embarassed Colts watching on the sidelines, celebrated their second NFL title with a dominating win over a clear favorite.

Final Score: Dallas-17 Baltimore-0

Real Life Score (In Cleveland): Baltimore-34 Cleveland-0
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Old 02-21-2007, 11:11 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Super Bowl III

Super Bowl III

The Orange Bowl, Miami, FL

Oakland Raiders (12-2)


Head Coach: John Rauch
453 Points Scored
233 Points Allowed

Starting Quarterback: Daryle Lamonica


Road to the Super Bowl:
Defeated New York Jets, 31-6-AFL Championship



Dallas Cowboys (12-2)


Head Coach: Tom Landry
431 Points Scored
186 Points Allowed

Starting Quarterback: Don Meredith


Road to the Super Bowl:
Defeated Cleveland, 31-27-NFL Divisional Playoffs
Defeated Baltimore, 17-0-NFL Championship

The Game

The losers of the previous two Super Bowls faced each other for the first time in Super Bowl III. The Dallas Cowboys were still feeling the sting of losing to the Buffalo Bills in the first championship game, while the Oakland Raiders were attempting to go all the way after finishing just short last season.

After their impressive play in the NFL Championship, Dallas came out and somehow looked even better, blocking a George Blanda field goal on Oakland's opening drive, then shutting the Raiders down for the rest of the first half. While neither team could score in the first quarter, Dallas' running attack had started to open some holes in Oakland's front, and they would be exploited early in the second quarter. Halfback Craig Baynham, who spent much of the year as a backup to Don Perkins, scored the first points of Super Bowl III with a three yard touchdown run two minutes into the second quarter.

Oakland was forced to punt after three plays on their next possession, and Dallas returned the kick to Oakland's 24 yard line. Lance Rentzel came down with a Don Meredith pass in the end zone, giving Dallas a seemingly overwhelming 14-0 lead. Oakland would get no more chances the rest of the half, putting the Cowboys in position to win their first Super Bowl.

Neither team could advance the ball in their first possession of the second half, but Dallas was able to make headway the second time they had the ball. Using Dan Reeves, Don Perkins and Craig Baynham, Dallas pummeled the Raiders into submission, and when Baynham burst through the middle for a 49 yard touchdown, the game was over in every aspect except time. The Cowboys hardly passed the ball after that, and their defense was up to the task of stopping the Raiders, only allowing three points when Oakland blocked a punt and started at Dallas' one yard line. In a picture of how well Dallas played, the Raiders lost three yards on three plays and settled for a Blanda field goal. Oakland would mount no more threats, and Dallas had claimed what they believed was theirs prior to Super Bowl I.

Final Score: Dallas-21 Oakland-3

MVP: Craig Baynham: 9 carries, 73 yards, 2 catches, 18 yards, 2 TD
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Old 02-21-2007, 09:58 PM   #24 (permalink)
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The Jets wuz robbed!!!!
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Old 02-24-2007, 12:20 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Dude.....where are ya?
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Old 02-24-2007, 01:15 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magnet View Post


Lets see the Vikes do better than 0-4 in the Super Bowl!
Sounds good, and see them win it all in '98 also.

Suggestions, maybe post all the super bowl winners in your first post so we can see quickly who the real super bowl winners were and who yours were.
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Old 02-24-2007, 01:59 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by molarmite View Post
Sounds good, and see them win it all in '98 also.

Suggestions, maybe post all the super bowl winners in your first post so we can see quickly who the real super bowl winners were and who yours were.
I like that idea. I'll do that right now, and then start working on the playoffs leading up to Super Bowl IV.
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Old 02-24-2007, 03:12 PM   #28 (permalink)
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1969 AFL Playoffs: One More Before the Merge & On To Super Bowl IV

For the final season of the AFL as a seperate league, four teams made the playoffs as the NFL's playoff structure was adopted in preparation for the merge, which will take place following Super Bowl IV.

AFL Divisional Playoffs

New York Jets (10-4)
vs. Kansas City Chiefs (11-3)
Shea Stadium, Flushing, NY

Last season, the Jets were humiliated by the Oakland Raiders in the AFL Championship game. This year, the now two time defending AFL Eastern Division champions looked more prepared, and again had the MVP of the league in Joe Namath. However, the Chiefs came in with the best defense in the AFL, and just like the Raiders proved last year, the Chiefs were able to push the Jets around with defense.

However, it was Kansas City's offense that did the talking in the first quarter, taking the opening kickoff and marching with the ball for the first nine minutes of the game. Although they had to settle for a Jan Stenerud field goal, the Chiefs were already forcing their style of play onto the brash New York team. Kansas City did the same thing on their first full possession of the second quarter, with quarterback Len Dawson and halfback Mike Garrett leading the charge, the Chiefs were able to put up another field goal and extend their lead to 6-0. On their next possession, Stenerud's kick sailed wide left, but the Chiefs were granted another chance with the ball when Namath's pass was intercepted by Jim Kearney and returned to New York's 43.

After a quarter and a half of pounding on New York's defensive line, Mike Garrett finally broke through it on that drive, taking a handoff and going 31 yards up the middle for a touchdown that put the Chiefs ahead 13-0. With only 45 seconds to go in the half, Namath's wild passing finally settled down, and he put New York in position to kick a field goal. Kicker Jim Turner's attempt was good, and New York was down only 10 heading into the half.

Defense was the name of the game in the second half, and Kansas City was more than happy to accomodate the Jets. Throughout the second half, the Chiefs would take the ball for long stretches of time before making it to the cusp of field goal range and punting it back to the Jets. While they were not scoring any points, they were keeping Joe Namath off the field. The only points in the third quarter came on another Stenerud field goal. On their very next possession to start the fourth quarter, the Chiefs took the ball 57 yards in eight plays and finished with a Dawson touchdown pass to Gloster Richardson that put the lead at 23-3. With New York's running game rendered useless by Kansas City's dominant defense, and Namath (9/21, 118, 1 INT) unable to find his stride, the Jets once again found themselves being embarassed at home by a superior opponent.

When the gun sounded, the Chiefs were headed to their second AFL Championship in four years, while the Jets were left to wonder exactly what went wrong this time around.

Final Score: Kansas City-23 New York Jets-3

Real Life Score: Kansas City-13 New York Jets-6


Oakland Raiders (12-1-1) vs. Houston Oilers (6-6-2)
Oakland-Alameda Stadium, Oakland, CA

The biggest mismatch in AFL playoff history took place in Oakland in the divisional round of the AFL playoffs this year, as the mighty Raiders took on the seemingly overwhelmed Houston Oilers. Oakland was led by coach John Madden, quarterback Daryle Lamonica and a defense that took no prisoners. Houston was outscored by their opponents and their quarterback, Pete Beathard, threw 11 more interceptions than touchdowns on the season.

Throughout the game, Oakland had the advantage, but it seemed like they were almost toying with Houston, or not taking them seriously enough. Their defense continually stopped Houston's drives in the first quarter, but Oakland could not manage to score any points, as George Blanda missed a 41 yard field goal. The second quarter was a different story, however. Houston still could not move on Oakland's defense, but Oakland was able to get going against Houston's, scoring on three consecutive drives. Two Blanda field goals and a Herwitt Dixon 24 yard touchdown run put the Raiders up 13-0 at the half.

The second half was more of the same for both teams. Oakland's offense, sensing no need to attempt to do more than they already had, proceeded to hold onto the football for extended drives that resulted in no points, but exhausted Houston's defense. Houston's offense fared no better, scoring no points and only crossing midfield once before the fourth quarter. The lone points in the second half came on a Lamonica eight yard touchdown pass to Fred Biletnikoff midway through the third. Oakland's defense kept Houston off the board, and sent the Raiders to their third straight AFL Championship game.

Final Score: Oakland-20 Houston-0

Real Life Score: Oakland-56 Houston-7


AFL Championship Game

Oakland-Alameda Stadium, Oakland, CA

Oakland Raiders (12-1-1) vs. Kansas City Chiefs (11-3)

The Oakland Raiders were full of confidence going into their AFL Championship game matchip with the Kansas City Chiefs. After all, they had won the previous two AFL titles, and they had also defeated the Chiefs twice during the 1969 season. However, if there was one thing that the Chiefs had in their favor, it was that they knew the Raiders' strengths and weaknesses, and in this title game, those factors would come into play as the AFL was sent off with one of its most exciting games.

In the first quarter, Oakland's defense seemed to have retained the ferocity it had against Houston, keeping the Chiefs from moving the ball into Raider territory, and giving their offense even better field position. The second time this happened, Oakland started with the ball in Kansas City territory, and it took just eight plays for Daryle Lamonica to find Charlie Smith just outside the end zone. He walked in untouched for the score, and Oakland was leading 7-0.

The Chiefs were finally able to cross midfield and respond to Oakland late in the second quarter, when Len Dawson finally found the level of play he had been at for most of the season. He marched the Chiefs down the field, completing passes to Otis Taylor and Mike Garrett, then, when that stalled, he sent Garrett running head first into Oakland's powerful defensive front. Eventually, that stalled as well, and the Chiefs settled for a Jan Stenerud field goal that dropped Oakland's lead to four points. On the Raiders' next possession, however, they would strike back. Daryle Lamonica passed the Raiders right back down the field, and with just 14 seconds left in the half, found Warren Wells in the corner of the end zone with a 24 yard rocket to put Oakland up 14-3 at halftime.

Oakland's intensity carried over to the second half, and they recorded an early safety when Dawson was sacked by Dan Conners in the end zone. The safety put the Raiders up by 13 points and seemingly closed the door on any hope that Kansas City had, especially when they could not score in the third quarter.

The fourth quarter was another story for both teams. Kansas City started with the football, and finally started to make headway against Oakland's defense. When Dawson found Frank Pitts along the side of the end zone, the Chiefs were suddenly back in the game, 16-9, but they had suffered a possibly crushing blow. Dawson was hammered just as he released the ball by Oakland lineman Dan Birdwell and was injured. Although he was able to leave the field, it would be up to backup Mike Livingston to lead the Chiefs back. Though their chances looked grim, Livingston did what he had to do, completing his first pass of the game to Pitts for 24 yards on a third and 21. Just two plays later, he found Otis Taylor streaking behind the Raider secondary and hit him in stride. The 41 yard touchdown pass with only a 1:19 to play put the Chiefs up 17-16 and silenced the once rabid Oakland fans.

The now shellshocked Raiders were unable to even move the ball on their last drive. Lamonica's final pass was over the head of everybody, and Kansas City was able to run out the clock. With an incredible, unthinkable comeback, the Chiefs were headed to their first Super Bowl as the final champions of the AFL.

Final Score: Kansas City-17 Oakland-16

Real Life Score: Kansas City-17 Oakland-7
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Old 02-25-2007, 03:24 PM   #29 (permalink)
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1969 NFL Playoffs: One More Before the Merge & On To Super Bowl IV

NFL Divisional Playoffs

Minnesota Vikings (12-2)
vs. Los Angeles Rams (11-3)
Metropolitan Stadium, Bloomington, MN

After a dismal showing in last season's playoffs where the Baltimore Colts defeated them by 37 points, the Minnesota Vikings came out for the 1969 season poised and ready to strike at the rest of the NFL. Standing in their way were the Los Angeles Rams, who missed the playoffs in 1968 and were more than ready to prove their win in Super Bowl II was not a fluke.

The Rams did just that early in the first quarter. After pinning the Vikings deep in their own territory, Joe Kapp's first pass of the game was intercepted by Willie Daniel, who took the ball to the Minnesota four yard line. Although the Rams could not punch it in from there, they did get a Bruce Gossett field goal that gave them the lead. With their final possession of the first quarter, Rams quarterback Roman Gabriel daftly passed Los Angeles down the field, accounting for 42 of the 43 yards needed to reach the end zone. Les Josephson put the Rams ahead 10-0 with a 16 yard cath and run. The Vikings, now faced the the daunting task of coming from behind against the Fearsome Foursome, could do nothing in the second quarter, and punted every time they had the ball. Los Angeles, content with their lead and unable to establish a running game, did the same and went into the half with a ten point lead.

Both defenses ruled the day for the first part of the second half, as neither team could get anything going with the run or the pass. Gabriel made his only mistake of the game when he threw an interception in Rams territory, but Los Angeles made up for the mistake when they forced the Vikings to punt, and returned that same punt down to Minnesota's three yard line. From there, Gabriel was able to make a simple pass to halfback Larry Smith, and the Rams were up 17-0.

Minnesota finally got on the board late in the third quarter with a Fred Cox field goal, but by then, the Rams had total control over the game. Without a solid running game, Minnesota could not establish themselves on the field, and the Rams were able to rush Kapp on almost every play. The two teams would exchange field goals in the fourth quarter and the Rams found themselves bound for a much warmer place than Minnesota as they advanced to the NFL Championship for the second time in three years.

Final Score: Los Angeles-20 Minnesota-6

Real Life Score: Minnesota-23 Los Angeles-20


Dallas Cowboys (11-2-1) vs. Cleveland Browns (10-3-1)
The Cotton Bowl, Dallas, TX

For the third straight season, the Browns and Cowboys faced off in the NFL playoffs. The previous two times, Dallas had come out victorious and advanced to the NFL Championship. With another trip on the line, Cleveland was going to attempt to do everything they could to finally get past Dallas. What they got was the best from both teams in an offensive shootout that had the fans on their feet all day long.

Cleveland had manhandled Dallas 42-10 in the regular season, and at the start of the game, it looked like that could happen again. Quarterback Bill Nelson guided the Browns down the field on the first possession of the game, masterfully passing the ball through Dallas' secondary. On the first running play of the game, halfback Ron Johnson burst through the defensive line and went 18 yards for a Cleveland touchdown. Dallas was able to respond as quickly as Cleveland first scored. After a 59 yard run by back Calvin Hill on their first play, quarterback Craig Morton found Lance Rentzel 13 yards away, in the end zone, and Dallas had tied the game.

After Cleveland was stopped on a fourth down conversion attempt in Dallas territory, the Cowboys went on the move again. This time, Calvin Hill was their main battering ram, and the young halfback did not disappoint, scoring a 39 yard touchdown on pitch play that broke down Cleveland's defense perfectly. The Browns were quick to respond this time, driving 54 yards in nine plays and finishing their drive with a 22 yard pass from Nelson to wideout Gary Collins that knotted the score at 14-14 after one quarter of play.

The second quarter started out just like the first. In just three plays, Dallas went 69 yards, with Morton finding Dennnis Homan in the end zone for a 19 yard touchdown, putting the Cowboys ahead by a score once again. Finally, both teams' defense decided to show up, and neither team would score again for the rest of the half. The only other chance was a Dallas missed field goal about halfway through the quarter.

With Dallas getting the ball first in the second half, Cleveland knew they had to make a stand, and they did so very quickly. After stopping the Cowboys on their first three plays, the Browns blocked Dallas' punt and returned it for a touchdown that tied the score. With momentum on their side, the Browns stripped tight end Mike Ditka on Dallas' next possession and recovered at their own 46. They then moved down the field, pounding the ball ahead with halfbacks Ron Johnson and Leroy Kelly. When that stalled, they settled for a Don Cockroft 31 yard field goal that put them in front for the first time since the first quarter.

With their backs against the wall, the Cowboys responded yet again. On their last drive of the third quarter, they finally began moving the ball again on Cleveland's defense. The dual running attack of Calvin Hill and Walt Garrison blasted Cleveland's front seven, and when they brought the secondary in to help with the run, Morton found Bob Hayes behind the coverage for a seven yard touchdown pass, putting Dallas ahead 28-24.

Dallas's running game set the tone in the fourth quarter, as both Hill (20 carries, 170 yards) and Garrison (15 carries, 101 yards) ate up precious time that the Browns needed to make a comeback. Morton's fourth touchdown pass of the game, this one to Dan Reeves, with three minutes to play sealed the deal, and the Cowboys were headed to their fourth straight NFL Championship.

Final Score: Dallas-35 Cleveland-24

Real Life Score: Cleveland-38 Dallas-14


NFL Championship Game

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles Rams (11-3) vs. Dallas Cowboys (11-2-1)

In a rematch of the NFL Championship from two years ago, the defending Super Bowl Champion Dallas Cowboys took on the Super Bowl champions from the year before, the Los Angeles Rams. Though some of the faces had changed in the time that these two teams had squared off for the right to go to the Super Bowl, the dreams and desires of the players had not, and these two teams put on a game for the ages in the final NFL game held before the merge.

Dallas' plan of attack was to attempt to use halfbacks Calvin Hill and Walt Garrison much like they had the week before against Cleveland. On their first drive, it worked to perfection. Hill and Garrison were involved in all but one play on the drive, and Hill was able to score from 28 yards out on a draw play, giving the Cowboys the lead and taking momentum away from the Fearsome Foursome. Their next drive was more of the same, although now the Rams' defenders were cheating up in anticipation for the run. When they did that, quarterback Craig Morton was able to throw over their heads, and he did that several times on that drive, finishing it off with a touchdown pass to Lance Rentzel from 20 yards out to put Dallas ahead 14-0.

The Rams needed to do something in order to get themselves back into the game, and NFL MVP Roman Gabriel was just the man to do it. Gabriel expertly led the Rams down the field on their next possession, finishing it off with a 27 yard touchdown pass to Wendell Tucker that cut the Cowboy lead in half. Dallas was able to strike back on their first possession of the second quarter. Following a Gabriel interception, Dallas' running attack again came to fruition, with Walt Garrison busting down the left sideline for 49 yards and Calvin Hill scoring on the next play from nine yards out. Once again, Dallas' lead was 14 points.

The Rams could do nothing on their next possession and were force to punt the ball to Dallas. With almost 4 minutes remaining in the half, the Cowboys once again marched down the field, getting as far as the Los Angeles 4 yard line before having to kick a field goal that put them up 24-7. As time expired in the first half, the Rams looked beaten, while the Cowboys already seemed to be celebrating another NFL title.

At first, the third quarter looked to be a continuation of the first half for the Rams and Cowboys. Neither team could move the ball on their first possession, and the Rams were close to having to punt again before Gabriel completed a 17 yard pass to Larry Smith on third and 8 to keep the drive alive. Three plays later, Gabriel was able to do one better for Smith, finding him with a 13 yard pass for a touchdown that gave Los Angeles hope. Dallas missed a field goal on their next possession, and the Rams took the ball heading into the fourth quarter with at least a small glimmer of hope.

That glimmer soon exploded into a supernova for the Los Angeles. On their first possession of the fourth quarter, Gabriel found Tommy Mason with a 14 yard touchdown pass that cut the Dallas lead to three points. With their offense now making headway, the Los Angeles defense came to life, forcing the Cowboys to punt after just three plays. The Rams returned the punt to the Dallas 36 and from there were able to move far enough for Bruce Gossett to tie the game with a 33 yard field goal.

With nothing going right for them in the second half, Dallas started to get desperate. Plays that had worked in the first half were now being snuffed out by Los Angeles' defense, and the once steady Craig Morton was nervous and shaky. Dallas was forced to punt to the Rams with 4:30 remaining in the game, and when Roman Gabriel took the field, everyone knew what was coming. First, Les Josephson picked up 29 yards on a run up the middle. Then, the Rams used both Josephson and Larry Smith to batter the now tired Dallas fron four. With their line exhausted, Gabriel had all the time in the world to throw, and got the Rams down to the Dallas one yard line. From there, Gabriel's fourth touchdown pass of the afternoon, a quick out to Billy Truax, was simple, and the Rams took the lead for the first time all day with just 1:15 left to play.

Los Angeles' blitzing defense refused to let Morton get a clean look on Dallas' last drive, and his final pass of the game was picked off by Ed Meador, ending any hope Dallas had. As Gabriel ran out the clock, he soaked in the cheers and basked in the fact that the Rams were heading to their second Super Bowl.

Final Score: Los Angeles-31 Dallas-24

Real Life Score (In Minnesota): Minnesota-27 Cleveland-7
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Old 02-25-2007, 04:07 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Super Bowl IV

Super Bowl IV

Tulane Stadium, New Orleans, LA


Kansas City Chiefs (11-3)


Head Coach: Hank Stram
359 Points Scored
177 Points Allowed

Starting Quarterback: Len Dawson


Road to the Super Bowl:
Defeated New York Jets, 23-3-AFL Divisional Playoffs
Deafeated Oakland, 17-16-AFL Championship



Los Angeles Rams (11-3)


Head Coach: George Allen
320 Points Scored
243 Points Allowed

Starting Quarterback: Roman Gabriel


Road to the Super Bowl:
Defeated Minnesota, 20-6-NFL Divisional Playoffs
Defeated Dallas, 31-24-NFL Championship



The Game

Two of the best defenses in football squared off in the final Super Bowl before the NFL and AFL were to merge. The Kansas City Chiefs made a living off of their defense, with coach Hank Stram establishing himself as one of the best in all of football. Kansas City's offense was led by quarterback Len Dawson, halfback Mike Garrett and receiver Otis Taylor. The Rams featured a newer, but still equally fearsome, front four, while quarterback Roman Gabriel was the NFL MVP.

Defense was the name of the game early in Super Bowl IV, as neither team could even get past midfield on their first two possessions. On the Chiefs' third possession of the game, Len Dawson was pressured by Deacon Jones and threw an interception into the hands of Doug Woodlief. Woodlief took the ball 36 yards for a touchdown, marking the first defensive touchdown in Super Bowl history. The extra point made it 7-0, and the Rams had the lead heading into the second quarter.

Once the second quarter started, it was more of the same for the Chiefs. Dawson was intercepted for the second time on the first play of the quarter, this time by Ron Smith, giving the Rams the ball deep in Kansas City territory. The Rams could not get a first down, but they were able to have Bruce Gossett kick a 26 yard field goal to extend the lead to 10-0. On Kansas City's very next drive, Dawson threw his third interception of the game as this one found Doug Woodlief once again. Though the Rams turned it back over just five plays later, the tone of the game had already been set.

On their next possession, Kansas City finally looked like they were making progress. They had advanced into Los Angeles territory for the first time, and the Rams looked to be back on their heels. Coach Hank Stram then called a play that will live in infamy. The play was called 65 Toss Power Trap, and though the Chiefs had not run that play in some time, the Rams were prepared for it. Mike Garrett fumbled the ball after being stopped in the backfield and the Rams recovered, effectively ending the best chance the Cheifs had to score the entire day up to that point. The Rams had to punt after the fumble, but once again, they proved how this game was going to be played.

Following the punt, Kansas City finally completed a drive without a punt or a turnover. Dawson got the Chiefs down the field but was unable to guide them into the end zone, instead settling for a Jan Stenerud field goal with under a minute to play in the half. After 30 minutes of football, the Rams were ahead by a touchdown.

Once the third quarter started, neither team found a way to move the ball against the opposing defense. Punts were more frequent than first downs throughout the third quarter, and the only points came on a Bruce Gossett field goal that put the Rams back on top by ten points. Inn the fourth quarter, it was more of the same. Gossett added his third field goal on the first play of the quarter and his fourth came on Los Angeles' next drive following another Mike Garrett fumble.

The Chiefs were running out of time, and their offense could not pass the ball against a ferocious Los Angeles rush. Dawson was totally ineffective (14/25, 161, 3 INT) until the closing minutes of the game, when he finally got the Chiefs into scoring position. Garrett made up for his earlier two fumbles with an 11 yard touchdown run. However, the Chiefs missed the extra point and found themselves down 19-9. After a poor kick return, the Chiefs brought down Gabriel in the end zone for a safety to make the score 19-11, but they could get no closer. The Rams were able to run out the rest of the clock using short passes and draw plays, and when the gun sounded, they were Super Bowl champions for the second time.

Final Score: Los Angeles-19 Kansas City-11

MVP: Doug Woodlief: 1 tackle, 2 INT, 1 TD
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Old 02-25-2007, 08:39 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Man, in four seasons only TWO teams who made it to the SB in real life have managed to make it here, with both losing.
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Old 02-27-2007, 02:38 PM   #32 (permalink)
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1970 AFC Playoffs: Two Leagues Become One-The Road to Super Bowl V

Following the merger of the AFL and NFL, two seperate conferences were established for the former individual leagues. The American Football Conference, formerly the AFL, was comprised of each of the ten AFL franchises, as well as the Pittsburgh Steelers, Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Colts. Although only one of those teams would make an impact in 1970, harmony seemed to finally have been reached in professional football.

AFC Divisional Playoffs


Baltimore Colts (11-2-1)
vs. Cincinnati Bengals (8-6)
Memorial Stadium, Baltimore, MD

The surprising Cincinnati Bengals, who turned a 1-6 start into an 8-6 final record and an AFC Central Division title, took their act on the road for their first ever playoff game against the well established Baltimore Colts. For many, Paul Brown's Bengals were an afterthought, a team not worthy of even belonging in the same stadium as the mighty Colts. After this playoff game, however, the Colts would certainly like to argue that statement.

At the start of the game, it certainly looked as if the Colts would run up and down the field all day on the Bengals. On Cincinnati's second drive, quarterback Virgil Carter's pass was intercepted by the Colts. Seven plays and 48 yards later, the ageless Johnny Unitas found Norm Bulaich in the end zone for a four yard touchdown that put the Colts ahead 7-0. It would not take long for the Bengals to wake up following that initial shock. On their very next drive, Cincinnati took their game into the teeth of Baltimore's defense, gaining large portions of yards with running backs Jess Phillips and Paul Robinson. On the second play of the second quarter, Robinson took a pitch and ran 28 yards to the end zone, tying the game and putting most people in Memorial Stadium into a state of shock.

The next Baltimore drive did little to calm the nerves of the fans. The Colts lost 17 yards on the drive, and when their punt was returned to their own 36 yard line, it was now the Bengals who had a chance to break the game open. Fortunately for the Colts, Cincinnati could not get a first down, and had to settle for a Horst Muhlmann field goal and a three point lead. Rookie kicker Jim O'Brien finally gave the Colts something to be excited about when he tied the game with a 35 yard kick on Baltimore's next possession that ended the scoring in the first half. As the teams walked off the field, Cincinnati was feeling as if they had already shocked the world, while the Colts could not believe what had happened.

Whatever was said in the locker room at halftime must have worked for the Colts, because they came right out with the football on their opening drive and took the lead with another O'Brien field goal. They then switched their focus over to their running game, in order to run large chunks of time off the clock. Their defense also stepped up in the second half, holding the Bengals to only two first downs in the third quarter. As the fourth quarter started, the Bengals still could not get their offense back to where it was in the first half. Virgil Carter was ineffective in the pocket, and their once stellar running game had stalled out. Cincinnati had two final chances to score in the fourth, but Carter was intercepted to end one drive and receiver Speedy Thomas fumbled on Cincinnati's last offensive play. The Colts were able to run out the clock and headed to their first AFC Championship.

Final Score: Baltimore-13 Cincinnati-10

Real Life Score: Baltimore-17 Cincinnati-0


Oakland Raiders (8-4-2) vs. Miami Dolphins (10-3-1)
Oakland-Alameda Stadium, Oakland, CA

For a team making their very first playoff appearance, the Miami Dolphins certainly had the look of a much more experienced team. Quarterback Bob Griese had been battle tested in many losing seasons with the Dolphins, while running backs Larry Csonka, Jim Kiick and Mercury Morris formed a tandem that very few teams could best. Wide receiver Paul Warfield, in his first season in Miami, gave the Dolphins a deep receiving threat. However, they were facing the veteran Oakland Raiders, and many of their players had already been to two Super Bowls. With playoff experience against relative newcomers, the battle lines were drawn.

The first quarter of the game was defined by defense. Neither team could score on their opening possessions, both of which were long, time consuming drives that faltered just out of field goal range. The second time they had the football, the Dolphins were able to move into range before stalling, and kicker Garo Yepremian booted a 26 yard field goal to put Miami on top. Oakland tied the game midway through the second with a George Blanda field goal and after a Bob Griese interception, they took the lead on a Daryle Lamonica touchdown pass to Herwitt Dixon. Neither team could break through for the rest of the half, and the Raiders went into the locker room with a touchdown lead.

Oakland came out after the half with a confident attitude, and it showed on their first possession. The Raiders drove the length of the field against the Dolphins, and Lamonica found Fred Biletnikoff from one yard out to give the Raiders a 17-3 lead. Miami was able to get another Yepremian field goal on their next drive, but heading into the fourth quarter, they found themselves down 17-6 and in need of a miracle to even make the game competitive.

What they got was just that. On their first possession of the quarter, Larry Csonka rumbled his way into the end zone from six yards away, but Yepremian missed the extra point. Oakland had trouble fielding the kickoff, and the Raiders started their drive inside their own five. The Dolphins were able to take advantage, dropping Lamonica in the end zone for a safety, making the Oakland lead only three points. After a quick punt by the Dolphins, the Raiders made another costly mistake. This time, Lamonica's pass was intercepted by Lloyd Mumphord, who returned it 54 yards for a touchdown and the lead. Down now to their last chance, Lamonica took the Raiders on an almost eight minute drive, converting a fourth and nine at one point, to put the Raiders in position to score. With just under two minutes remaining, he found Fred Biletnikoff in the end zone for a touchdown that put the Raiders up 24-21.

With the lead once again, Oakland's defense was able to step up, stopping Griese's passing attacks with ease and getting the ball away from Miami after just five plays. The Raiders were then able to run out the clock, and Oakland was headed for their fourth consecutive AFC Championship.

Final Score: Oakland-24 Miami-21

Real Life Score: Oakland-21 Miami-14


AFC Championship Game

Memorial Stadium, Baltimore, MD

Baltimore Colts (11-2-1) vs. Oakland Raiders (8-4-2)

The 1970 AFC Championship game was between two of the most powerful teams in professional football over the past half decade. Of course, the Baltimore Colts were doing their work in the NFL, while the Oakland Raiders became one of the best teams in the AFL. In their first ever meeting, the Colts and Raiders would put on a show worthy of the new merged league, with a winner not decided until the final minute of play.

On the first play from scrimmage, Daryle Lamonica's pass was intercepted by the Colts and returned to Oakland's 33 yard line. Although the Colts could only get a Jim O'Brien field goal out of the early turnover, momentum had been claimed for the first quarter. Batlimore's defense pushed the Raiders around, stopping them from moving past the 50 yard line on any drive. While the Colts could do no better until the end of the quarter, their defense was doing more than enough to make sure the Colts had the lead.

On the first play of the second quarter, Johnny Unitas found Roy Jefferson, who walked into the end zone untouched for a four yard touchdown that put the Colts up 10-0. Oakland was finally able to move on offense on their second possession of the quarter, getting down to Baltimore's 12 yard line before stalling and having to settle for a George Blanda field goal. Just one offensive play later, the tide of the game would turn completely.

Unitas' first pass on Baltimore's next possession was intercepted by Oakland's Nemiah Wilson. With nothing but open field in front of him, Wilson was able to run 20 yards untouched for the game tying touchdown. All of a sudden, Baltimore's momentum was in Oakland's hands, but if one man could take it back, it was Johnny Unitas. The old quarterback led the Colts right back down the field, mixing run and pass together to confuse Oakland's defense. On fourth and goal from Oakland's one yard line, fullback Tom Nowatzke pounded the ball into the end zone, giving the Colts the lead back with just a minute and a half to go in the half.

Oakland would not waste that minute and half as Lamonica lived up to his "Mad Bomber" nickname. He guided the Raiders down towards Baltimore's end zone, keeping his passes near the sideline so Oakland could stop the clock. Finally, with five seconds left in the half, he found Warren Wells for the tying touchdown. At the half, neither team was sure who would win, but everyone was certain that the next 30 minutes of football would be some of the most intense of the entire season.

For just the second time in the game, it appeared as if Oakland had momentum on their side, as they marched down the field with the opening possession of the second half to Baltimore's eight yard line. Though they could not get it into the end zone, Blanda was able to make the field goal, giving the Raiders a 20-17 lead. With just under five minutes to play in the third, Unitas struck again on a quick drive, finding Eddie Hinton open in the middle of the field. Hinton did the rest, charging 43 yards for the go ahead score. As the game reached its final quarter, the stands were literally shaking in their foundations.

While Baltimore's defense was stopping Oakland for the most part at the start of the fourth quarter, the Colts could get nothing done on offense either. The first two times they had the ball, they were driven backwards, and Oakland continued to get better and better field position. When Blanda missed a 47 yard field goal attempt with 5:30 left in the game, things looked bleak for the Raiders. However, their defense once again stepped up, stopping the Colts on three plays and forcing a punt. On their next possession, Lamonica found Rod Sherman streaking down the sideline and hit him in stride, but just eight yards from the goal line, he fumbled the football and a trailing Baltimore defender was able to recover.

With almost no chance left, Oakland's defense pinned its ears back and came after Unitas and the Colts. What they ended up doing was force them back to their own goaline, where they had to punt. Baltimore's punt was off the side of their punter's foot and and got caught in the wind, finally coming to a stop at their own 26 yard line. With just 1:21 remaining, the Raiders would have one last shot. After two running plays that gained 20 yards, Oakland found themselves just six yards away from a victory, but time was running out, and they were out of timeouts. Marv Hubbard was stopped after a one yard run in an attempt to catch the Colts off guard. On second down, with 40 seconds remaining and the clock running, Lamonica managed to squeeze a pass in between two Baltimore defenders to Raymond Chester for a touchdown and the lead.

Now down 27-24, Unitas tried all that he could, but his old knees were not able to stand up to the intense Oakland pass rush. There was not enough time left for the Colts, and the Raiders had won one of the more amazing title games in history after losing under similar cirumstances the year before.

Final Score: Oakland-27 Baltimore-24

Real Life Score: Baltimore-27 Oakland-17
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Old 02-27-2007, 06:09 PM   #33 (permalink)
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1970 NFC Playoffs: Two Leagues Become One-The Road to Super Bowl V

NFC Divisional Playoffs

Dallas Cowboys (10-4)
vs. Detroit Lions (10-4)
The Cotton Bowl, Dallas, TX

The perennial playoff powerhouse Dallas Cowboys found themselves facing a different opponent in the divisional round of the NFC Playoffs for the first time in three years as they took on the surprising Detroit Lions for the right to go to the NFC Championship. The Lions boasted a powerful defense and an offense led by running backs Mel Farr and Altie Taylor, as well as a passing game keyed by Charlie Sanders.

At the start of the game, neither team could move the ball, as both Dallas and Detroit found that playing against a very strong defense makes even thinking about getting a first down difficult and painful. It seemed as if the first big play of the game would come by a stroke of luck, and that's exactly what happened.

Dallas rookie running back Duane Thomas took a handoff from quarterback Craig Morton with a pair of Lions defenders bearing down right at him. As if by instinct, the young man ducked low enough that the two opposing players missed on their hits, leaving a wide open running lane for him to fill. Sixty-six yards later, Thomas was in the end zone, and Dallas had a 7-0 lead. Thomas would strike again in the second quarter, when he scored for the second time, this time with a four yard burst up the middle. Dallas' mighty defense stopped Detriot in their tracks, and at the half, the Cowboys were holding onto a 14-0 shutout.

The Lions had been playing poorly all day on offense, and it seemed that it was only a matter of time before they finally came to life. Midway through the third quarter, thanks to a good punt return, it happened. Quarterback Bill Munson, who had come in for starter Greg Landry, hit Charlie Sanders with a five yard touchdown pass that cut Dallas' lead in half. The rest of the third quarter was filled with punts, as both teams again settled into a defensive mindset.

Heading into the fourth, the Lions knew that they had to establish their running game if they wanted to win. On their first possession of the quarter, they were able to do just that, using both Taylor and Farr to break apart the Dallas front four. Farr scored the game tying touchdown on a two yard run, and suddenly Dallas wasn't nearly as confident as they had been. Of course, that feeling didn't last too long, as the Cowboys came galloping right down the field on the legs on Thomas and Walt Garrison. Together, along with second year quarter back Roger Staubach, the running backs were able to dismantle Detriot's defense, putting them in position for a go ahead score. Garrison gave them that score with a nine yard run with just under 1:30 to play.

With the lead in hand once again, Dallas was able to stop Detroit's last gasps on defense, finishing the game by knocking down a last second deep pass from Munson. The Dallas Cowboys were headed to their fifth consecutive NFC Championship.

Final Score: Dallas-21 Detroit-14

Real Life Score: Dallas-5 Detroit-0 (I swear, that must have been the most boring game ever!)


Minnesota Vikings (12-2) vs. San Francisco 49ers (10-3-1)
Metropolitan Stadium, Bloomington, MN

Something was bound to give in the matchup between the San Francisco 49ers and Minnesota Vikings, who had the league's highest scoring offense and least scored upon defense, respectively. The 49ers were relative newcomers to the land of success, and with NFL MVP John Brodie quarterbacking the team, they hoped to stay around for some time. The Vikings hoped to counter Brodie with the Purple People Eaters, one of the best defensive lines in all of football.

At the start of the game, it was Brodie who had the advantage over the Vikings. On just the second play from scrimmage, he found running back Doug Cunningham down the left side of the field, wide open. His pass was true, and 74 yards later, the 49ers had scored the first points of the game. The only misfortune came when the extra point attempt was missed by Bruce Gossett, but the 49ers still led 6-0.

After that first possession, the Vkings swore to each other not to give up another big play for the rest of the game, and then they went out to make good on their promise. Although they did allow San Francisco to kick a field goal early in the second quarter to stretch their lead to 9-0, they never allowed another big play the rest of the game. In fact, they made sure that the second quarter belonged to the Vikings.

After the San Francisco field goal, Minnesota quarterback Gary Cuozzo led his team down the field for the first time. He used short passes and handoffs to running back Dave Osborn to get the Vikings within field goal range, and Fred Cox put one through the uprights to cut the 49er lead to six points. On San Francisco's next play, Brodie's pass was intercepted and returned to the one yard line. Just one play later, Cuozzo found Gene Washington in the corner of the end zone for a touchdown. Minnesota's extra point was good, and they had the lead for the first time. San Francisco was forced to punt after just three plays, and Minnesota went right back down the field, ending this drive with a Clint Jones touchdown run. They finished the half with another Cox field goal, putting them in at the half with a 20-9 lead.

The second half belonged to the Minnesota Viking defense. They made good on their promise from the first half, absolutely dominating the 49ers when they decided to run or pass the ball. Brodie could do nothing the rest of the game, and finished 9 for 22 for 159 yards and the one touchdown. When the Vikings had the ball, they continually handed it off to their running backs, who were able to pick up first downs and eat time off the clock. The only scoring in the half came on Fred Cox's third field goal of the game with 1:19 to play. San Francisco left the field dominated, while the Vikings were headed to their first championship game.

Final Score: Minnesota-23 San Francisco-9

Real Life Score: San Francisco-17 Minnesota-14


NFC Championship Game

Metropolitan Stadium, Bloomington, MN

Minnesota Vikings (12-2) vs. Dallas Cowboys (10-4)

The battle between two of the more defensive minded teams in the NFL started the way that almost everyone thought it would, as the teams traded interceptions in the first minute of the game. From there, it was Minnesota who was able to take the early advantage, getting a 3-0 on a Fred Cox field goal on their second possession. Dallas, who was obivously looking for revenge following their 54-13 defeat in Minnesota earlier in the season, held their ground after that and didn't allow the Vikings to score again in the half.

After a quarter and a half of being stuck in the mud, Dallas' offense finally started to move. Craig Morton did the smartest thing he could have done up to that point: hand the ball off to his running backs. Walt Garrison and Duane Thomas each pounded into the Purple People Eaters, knocking them backwards and taking yardage that used to belong to Minnesota. Although the Cowboys had to settle for a Mike Clark field goal on their first scoring drive, they had sent a message to the Vikings. On their very next possession, they did the same thing, getting down inside the Minnesota five yard line with under 30 seconds to play. They had to again settle for a Clark field goal, but they now had the lead going into halftime.

Coming out of the half, it was obvious that the defenses would have control of this game throughout, and that was the case. Neither team could get moving during the first part of the third quarter. Only when Morton completed a screen pass to Thomas for a 63 yard touchdown did either team gain considerable yardage in the third quarter, although the Cowboys now had a 13-3 lead. Dallas also had Morton hurt on the play, and when Roger Staubach came in, he was also able to lead Dallas down the field, resulting in another field goal to give the Cowboys a 13 point lead just at the start of the fourth quarter.

Dallas' powerful defense was all that was needed in the fourth, as they kept Gary Cuozzo (7/33, 83 yards) bottled up all day. Without a passing game to move the ball quickly, the Vikings had no way of chipping away at Dallas' lead, and soon time became a factor. Only when Minnesota put in backup quarterback Bob Lee did the Vikings start to move. Dave Osborn scored on a 15 yard run to get the Vikings to within 6 points, but Dallas would not give the ball back again. Using Thomas, Walt Garrison and Calvin Hill, the Cowboys finished off any chance the Vikings had to comeback by making sure they never got the ball again. When the gun sounded, the Cowboys were going to their third Super Bowl and would face the Raiders in the first rematch in Super Bowl history.

Final Score: Dallas-16 Minnesota-10

Real Life Score (In San Francisco): Dallas-17 San Francisco-10
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Old 02-28-2007, 01:12 AM   #34 (permalink)
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Super Bowl V

Super Bowl V

The Orange Bowl, Miami, FL

Oakland Raiders (8-4-2)


Head Coach: John Madden
300 Points Scored
293 Points Allowed

Starting Quarterback: Daryle Lamonica


Road to the Super Bowl:
Defeated Miami, 24-21-AFC Divisional Playoffs
Defeated Baltimore, 27-24-AFC Championship



Dallas Cowboys (10-4)


Head Coach: Tom Landry
299 Points Scored
221 Points Allowed

Starting Quarterback: Craig Morton


Road to the Super Bowl:
Defeated Detroit, 21-14-NFC Divisional Playoffs
Defeated Minnesota, 16-10-NFC Championship



The Game

The first rematch in Super Bowl history took place between the Dallas Cowboys and the Oakland Raiders. Just two years before, defense had ruled the day as Dallas took Super Bowl III. With so many players from each team still playing in Super Bowl V, there was little doubt that it would be another defensive struggle, though no one could see that it would be the lowest scoring Super Bowl in history.

The game did not start out as if it would become a defensive struggle. On the opening drive of the game, Oakland was able to use it's running game effectively against Dallas and on the sixth play of the drive, Hewritt Dixon broke off tackle to the right and scampered 38 yards for the opening score. Oakland led 7-0, and their defense was going to make sure that they could hold the lead this time.

Dallas was battered and bruised against Oakland's defense this time around. They could muster only one first down in the first quarter, and quarterback Craig Morton was under an almost unstoppable pass rush by the Raiders. On their first possession of the second quarter, however, the Cowboys were able to move down the field, with Morton converting a third and eight and a third and fifteen, in route to a Mike Clark 41 yard field goal. Now, it was Oakland who was facing the pressure from a Dallas defense that knew full well what it could do. Lamonica was intercepted late in the second quarter, ending a possible scoring drive, and the first half ended with the Raiders up 7-3.

The third quarter was more of the same, with both teams attempting to use their running games to tire out and find holes in the opposing defenses. Dallas' two pronged attack of Duane Thomas and Walt Garrison did well, as did Oakland's Hewritt Dixon. Though neither team could get into scoring range, both knew what had to be done in the fourth and final quarter, and one team would finally be able to take advantage of a benefitial situation.

On their first possession of the fourth quarter, Dallas coach Tom Landry decided to remove Craig Morton from the game, replacing him with Roger Staubach. The move worked perfectly, as Staubach's running ability confused the Raiders, and his passes were crisp an on target, as opposed to much of what had left Morton's hand that day. Slowly but surely, the Cowboys drove down the field on the arm of Staubach. Finally, with just over eight minutes to go in Super Bowl V, he swung a pass out to Calvin Hill, who turned and ran upfield seemingly through every Oakland defender for a 27 yard touchdown reception. The extra point put Dallas up by three, 10-7.

Oakland still had time to work and at least have an attempt at a field goal to tie the game, but now time was working against them. Their first two attempts ended in punts, and though they kept the Cowboys from scoring, precious seconds were now melting away. With just about two minutes remaining in the game, the Raiders got one last chance after a missed Dallas field goal. Lamonica first found Dixon for a 16 yard gain out to the 48 yard line. After thre quick incomplete passes, the Raiders were down to 1:43 seconds remaining and facing a fourth and ten. Lamonica, under pressure, managed to throw a complete pass to Fred Biletnikoff, who ran out of bounds seven yards past the first down marker, giving the Raiders another chance.

On second and eight from Dallas' 33 yard line, Lamonica looked over the middle of the field for an open receiver. What exactly he saw, no one knows, but the ball ended up in the hands of Dallas linebacker Steve Kiner for Lamonica's second interception of the game. Kiner led his celebrating defense off the field as Morton began to run out the clock. Despite the best efforts from Oakland, including an MVP performance by running back Hewritt Dixon, the Raiders could not stop the Cowboys from becoming the second team to win multiple Super Bowl championships.

Final Score: Dallas-10 Oakland-7

MVP: Hewritt Dixon (Oakland): 16 carries, 95 yards, 1 catch, 16 yards, 1 TD (First MVP from a losing team.)
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Old 02-28-2007, 10:35 AM   #35 (permalink)
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Real Life Score: Dallas-5 Detroit-0 (I swear, that must have been the most boring game ever!)
Hah! You must have missed the Steeler/Seahawks Super Bowl. That one will never be topped.
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Old 02-28-2007, 03:27 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Oh, I watched that game, but by the end of it, I may have been a little bit intoxicated, so it seemed a lot better at the time. Come on though, 5-0??? That's a field goal and a safety, and that's it. At least Super Bowl 40 had some touchdowns and didn't resemble a baseball score.
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Old 03-01-2007, 10:09 AM   #37 (permalink)
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Come on though, 5-0??? That's a field goal and a safety, and that's it. At least Super Bowl 40 had some touchdowns and didn't resemble a baseball score.
What does score have to do with quality of game?
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Old 03-01-2007, 01:38 PM   #38 (permalink)
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Touché salesman. I've never seen the game, so I can't speak on that. I will tell you that Super Bowl 40 is definately up there in terms of poor games, especially with performance being called into play. I honestly can't even think of another game that I've watched in the past five years that was as boring as that one, and even before that, it's difficult to find something. So yeah, I would have to say that's the most boring game I've watched.

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Old 03-01-2007, 03:54 PM   #39 (permalink)
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1971 AFC Playoffs: Taking a Trip to Super Bowl VI

AFC Divisional Playoffs

Kansas City Chiefs (10-3-1)
vs. Miami Dolphins (10-3-1)
Municipal Stadium, Kansas City, MO

After a year away from the playoffs, the Kansas City Chiefs returned with one of the top teams in the AFC to take on the Miami Dolphins, who were looking to win their first playoff game after falling short against Oakland last year. Kansas City was still banking on Len Dawson and Otis Taylor to connect through the air, while Miami had a focused ground attack with Larry Csonka and Jim Kiick.

As the game started, Kansas City had the advantage first. Quarterback Len Dawson was able to pass over and around Miami defenders on the Chiefs' opening drive, guiding them 69 yards in 11 plays and putting Kansas City on the board first with an Otis Taylor three yard touchdown reception. It did not take long for Miami to respond, handing the ball to Kiick and Csonka on four straight plays, the last being a Csonka 39 yard touchdown run after Kiick gained 44 on the play before.

The second quarter featured the Chiefs attempting to take a page out of the Dolphins' playbook. Kansas City decided to shelve its passing game for much of the quarter, going instead with running backs Warren McVea and Ed Podolak, who were able to bash into the Miami defense for large portions of yardage. Unfortunately for Kansas City, this strategy only got them three points at the start of the quarter. Miami tied the score with just over two minutes remaining in the half, and both teams had turnovers cost them scoring chances on their last full possessions of the quarter. At the half, the Chiefs and Dolphins were tied at 10-10.

While the first two quarters had been more defined by offense, the third quarter would be defined by defense. The Dolphins struck first, blocking a Kansas City punt on their first drive of the half. Miami would get a field goal out of the block, and took their first lead of the game. Neither team could do anything the rest of the quarter, as the Chiefs still continued to run the ball straight into Miami's defensive front, shocking and angering fans who thought the best way to beat the Dolphins would be to pass over their front seven and test their secondary. With Miami up by just a field goal, the game entered its final quarter.

The fourth quarter proved to be Miami's undoing. Kansas City's running attack began to tire out the defense for the Dolphins, and Warren McVea retook the lead for the Chiefs with a 36 yard touchdown scramble up the middle. Miami caught a break on Kansas City's next drive when Len Dawson was intercepted as the Chiefs were getting closer to the end zone again. However, with the lead, Kansas City's defense now knew they had to hold on, and Brian Griese was hit by Bruce Bergey and fumbled. The Chiefs recovered deep in Miami territory, and Wendell Hayes found the end zone from 5 yards out to put the final nail in Miami's coffin. Kansas City racked up 230 rushing yards on the day, while holding the Dolphins to just 273 total yards. Miami was left battered by an AFC West opponent once again, and the Chiefs were going to their third AFC Championship.

Final Score: Kansas City-24 Miami-13

Real Life Score: Miami-27 Kansas City-24/2OT (Longest game in NFL history)


Cleveland Browns (9-5) vs. Baltimore Colts (10-4)
Cleveland Municipal Stadium, Cleveland, OH

Much like the Kansas City Chiefs, the Cleveland Browns were returning to the playoffs after a year's absence, although they were playing on the AFC side of the playoffs for the first time. The Browns relied heavily on running back Leroy Kelly to batter opposing defenses into surrender, while the Colts had one of the better defenses in all of football, and were rallying behind Johnny Unitas, whose time in football was almost up.

Baltimore set the tone of the game from the opening kickoff. After a good return, the Colts set about punishing the Cleveland's defense, first passing over top of them with Earl Morrall, then running right through them on the first running play of the game, which resulted in a 34 yard touchdown for Norm Bulaich. The Colts then set about containing Leroy Kelly and forcing quarterback Bill Nelsen to beat them. The plan worked to perfection in the first quarter, as Kelly was bottled up by Baltimore defenders, and Nelsen was totally ineffective.

The second quarter was more about sloppiness than anything else. Neither team could put together a sustained drive, as the Colts turned the ball over twice, and Cleveland missed two field goals that would have put them right back into the game. Morrall looked lost at times for Baltmore, while Nelsen hadn't even found the field yet for the Browns. Baltimore went into the half ahead 7-0, but even they knew they should have been holding on to a much slimmer lead at that time.

In the third, Baltimore fans got their wish, as Johnny Unitas entered the game to replace Morrall. Though his knees weren't what they used to be, and his once powerful arm couldn't throw the ball nearly as far as he used to, he was still able to lead the Colts on the only scoring drive of the quarter, completing three of four passes before Don Nottingham finished things with a 14 yard touchdown run. With the way Baltimore's defense was pounding the Browns, Cleveland would need a miracle to come back and win.

Whatever prayers they had were never answered. Kicker Don Cockroft missed his third field goal of the game early in the fourth, and the game was effectively over at that point. Baltimore continued to run time off the clock with their running game, while Cleveland's passing game was as ineffective as it had been all season. The Colts would add a late field goal and finished the shutout of Cleveland, while the Browns were left to wonder if they would get another chance at the Super Bowl next season.

Final Score: Baltimore-17 Cleveland-0

Real Life Score: Baltimore-20 Cleveland-3


AFC Championship Game

Municipal Stadium, Kansas City, MO

Kansas City Chiefs (10-3-1) vs. Baltimore Colts (10-4)

In the final football game played at Municipal Stadium, the Kansas City Chiefs faced off against the Baltimore Colts for the right to go to Super Bowl VI. The Chiefs won the AFC title just two years before, while the Colts fell short in the AFC title game against the Raiders last year. Both teams brought punishing defenses and older quarterbacks that each wanted one last shot at Super Bowl glory.

Much like their game the week before against the Browns, the Colts were able to start the AFC Championship off with a bang. On the first drive of the game, Earl Morrall, who started the game over Johnny Unitas, led the Colts down the field with a mixture of run and pass, and capped the drive with a Norm Buliach 35 yard touchdown run into the teeth of the Kansas City defense. Baltimore's defense stopped the Chiefs cold on their first drive, and Morrall stepped back out onto the field and promptly marched Baltimore right back down the field. Morrall was responsible for 45 of the 51 yards on Baltimore's drive, including the one yard touchdown pass to Tom Mitchell that put the Colts up 14-0 as the first quarter came to a close.

The second quarter was not much better for the Chiefs. Baltimore missed an early field goal attempt that would have put them up 17-0, but Kansas City could do nothing, and had to punt. On their next possession, Len Dawson was intercepted deep in Baltimore territory, ending a scoring drive that could have cut the Colts' lead in half. The Chiefs finally did get on the scoreboard with just 44 seconds to go in the half on a Jan Stenerud 30 yard field goal. The only problem was Kansas City's defense apparently thought the half was over, and they let the Colts head right back down the field and kick a field goal of their own as the half came to a close to make the score 17-3.

The remainder of the game was dominated by defense. The Colts attempted to use their running game to just take time off the clock while stopping the Chiefs both on the ground and through the air. Dawson was intercepted again in Baltimore territory, while Stenerud inexplicably missed another short field goal midway through the third. Kansas City would add one more field goal at the start of the fourth quarter, but after that, the Colts kept the ball away from their offense for the remained of the game. The running attack that had worked so well against the Dolphins could not get started, and the Chiefs were forced to watch as another team celebrated an AFC title as they closed down their old stadium.

Final Score: Baltimore-17 Kansas City-6

Real Life Score (In Miami): Miami-21 Baltimore-0
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1971 NFC Playoffs: Taking a Trip to Super Bowl VI

NFC Divisional Playoffs

Minnesota Vikings (11-3)
vs. Dallas Cowboys (11-3)
Metropolitan Stadium, Bloomington, MN

The rematch of last season's NFC Championship game was highly anticipated, though most people were expecting another defensive struggle. The only major change to either team on offense was Dallas deciding to go with Roger Staubach at quarterback over Craig Morton. Staubach, along with running back Duane Thomas and wide out Bob Hayes, helped make the Cowboys the highest scoring team in football. Meanwhile, Minnesota still had the Purple People Eaters and they were the key part of the stingiest defense in the NFL.

The majority of this game would be spent seeing which defense could batter the other offense more. Minnesota let up first, allowing Staubach to push the Cowboys into field goal range, but Mike Clark missed a 32 yard attempt midway through the first quarter, and the game remained scoreless. Meanwhile, Dallas' Doomsday Defense was pressuring quarterback Gary Cuozzo even more so than last year's NFC Championship game, and the Vikings could only punt during their possessions in the first quarter.

The second quarter saw more of the same from each defense, while Dallas began to make strides thanks to the mistakes of the Vikings. Two times in the second, Minnesota had what looked like a scoring drive going. Both times, Dallas defenders stripped the ball away from running back Oscar Reed, ending the threat. After the second fumble, Dallas advanced the ball slowly down the field, taking what little yardage they could get from the running game and letting Staubach make throws only when necessary. Mike Clark's field goal with 14 seconds left in the half was the lone score up to that point, and Dallas found themselves 30 minutes away from a sixth straight NFC Championship game appearance.

Neither team could even advance the ball in the third quarter, as the poor weather conditions in Minnesota began to have their way with the game. Minnesota still could not advance the ball even into field goal range, and Dallas had Mike Clark bounce a 38 yard field goal attempt off the upright near the end of the quarter, keeping the score at 3-0 Dallas heading into the fourth.

Minnesota mounted one last valiant effort against the Cowboys, but with their running attack only gaining 26 yards the entire day, the Vikings were stuck in the mud without any way of getting out. With just under two minutes to play, Gary Cuozzo finally had the Vikings going in the right direction, but Minnesota's third fumble of the game, this one by Al Denson, was recovered by Dallas at midfield, and Staubach was able to run out the rest of the clock, sending Dallas to yet another NFC Championship game.

Final Score: Dallas-3 Minnesota-0

Real Life Score: Dallas-20 Minnesota-12


San Francisco 49ers (9-5) vs. Washington Redskins (9-4-1)
Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CA

For the first time since 1945, the Washington Redskins were playing football with a chance to win a championship. New head coach George Allen brought his Super Bowl winning attitude with him from Los Angeles, and the "Over the Hill Gang" found it contagious. While Billy Kilmer and Larry Brown led the offense, the real strength of the team was on defensive side of the ball, which only allowed 190 points all season. San Francisco still had a powerful offense that was led by John Brodie, and their defense had improved as well, as they were inspired from last season's loss to Minnesota in the playoffs.

Whatever strength the 49ers' defense may have had wasn't showing in the first quarter. After stopping the Redskins on their opening drive, San Francisco allowed Kilmer to pass his way down the field, moving Washington closer and closer to a touchdown. Finally, backup running back Charlie Harraway plunged in from two yards out, giving Washington a 7-0 lead. San Francisco quickly responded, using Vic Washington on the ground to punish the Redskins as they moved into field goal range. Bruce Gossett's 49 yard boot cut the Redskins' lead to four points going into the second quarter.

Following a Redskin punt, the 49ers moved rapidly back down the field again to start the second quarter, with the main play being Vic Washington's 50 yard burst up the middle. Unfortunately for San Francisco, they again stalled and had to settle for another Gossett field goal that cut the lead to only one point. On their very next drive, they had a chance to take the lead, but Jack Pardee intercepted Brodie at the Washington 15, ending the last scoring threat either team would have in the half.

The second half was the definition of a defensive struggle. Washington was comfortable with their slim lead, and preferred to just run the ball and let their defense stop San Francisco. The 49ers had their chances to prove the Redskins wrong, but they could never do it. Gossett missed a 49 yard field goal towards the end of the third quarter, and Brodie was again intercepted in Washington territory with 12 minutes to go in the game. San Francisco would get no other chances, and Washington was off to see Dallas for a chance to go to Super Bowl VI.

Final Score: Washington-7 San Francisco-6

Real Life Score: San Francisco-24 Washington-20


NFC Championship Game

Texas Stadium, Irving, TX

Dallas Cowboys (11-3) vs. Washington Redskins (9-4-1)

For the first time, the NFC Championship game would be played between interdivisional opponents. Both the Redskins and Cowboys were quite familiar with each other, having split their games against each other this season. Their head coaches knew each other well, too, as George Allen and Tom Landry were the only two NFC coaches to have ever won the Super Bowl.

Just like both teams' games the week before, the NFC Championship would be won on defense. Washington got the ball first, and the Redskins moved down the field on Dallas, but Curt Knight missed what should have been an easy 30 yard field goal to keep Washington off the board. Dallas could do nothing either, punting the ball after falling just short of field goal range themselves. In fact, neither team would score until there were only 12 seconds remaining in the half. Dallas kicker Mike Clark made up for missing a field goal earlier in the second quarter by booting a 37 yarder that put the Cowboys up 3-0 at the half.

In the second half, Washington's offense still could not find a way to move the ball against Dallas. Their running game, which had done well the week before against San Francisco, was all but invisible and quarterback Billy Kilmer could not find any open receivers. The only thing keeping the Redskins in the game was the fact that Dallas was having a similar lack of success against Washington's defense. Staubach's normally crisp passes were being batted down by Washington linemen, and his open receivers were completely covered by Redskin defenders. The only scoring came on another Mike Clark field goal as the quarter came to a close.

The fourth quarter belonged to Dallas and its secondary. On two straight possessions, Kilmer got the Redskins into Dallas territory. Both times, he was intercepted by Dallas. Mel Renfro ended the first threat, while Herb Adderly finished off the second drive. On the very next Washington possession, Adderly struck again, jumping on a poorly thrown pass and returning it 12 yards for the only touchdown of the game. While the extra point was missed, it did not matter for Dallas. The Redskins would not mount another offensive threat, and Dallas was headed for their fourth Super Bowl.

Final Score: Dallas-12 Washington-0

Real Life Score: Dallas-14 San Francisco-3
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