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TBCB Inside the Ropes Your game and fantasy fights

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Old 06-04-2009, 10:42 PM   #101 (permalink)
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PWillis - perhaps, but with Dean's version of Chaplin from the Ratings of the Day thread, who knows what will happen in Atlantic City ...
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Old 06-04-2009, 11:42 PM   #102 (permalink)
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August 8, 1981

KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL


Big John's Right Puts
Sandman to Sleep





Big John Tate’s comeback continued Saturday night at the Stokley Athletics Center, but his win over Clayman Sandman Parker was hardly a huge step toward a shot at the world heavyweight title he lost last year.

Tate rendered Parker senseless with an overhand right midway through the eighth round, the third time the journeyman hit the canvas. Tate, who won his second straight since a pair of brutal knockout defeats in 1980 put his career in jeopardy, also dropped his foe in the third and eighth round.

“It felt good to put another man on the floor again,” Tate said. “I’m working my way back, slow but sure, and before you know it, I’ll be back where I was.”

The former titlist dominated most of the action, leading 68-63, 69-62 and 68-63 at the time of the knockout. But Parker – who lost his fourth in a row to fall to 30-12-1 with 17 knockouts -- landed several telling blows, including rights to the head in the second and fourth that had Tate covering up and clinching in order to ride out the round.

At least Big John was able to stay on his feet when hurt. The same could not be said for his catastrophic loss to Mike Weaver in the same ring on March 31, 1980, when he would have successfully defended his World Boxing Association crown if he could have lasted less than a minute more.

Weaver’s left hook, however, famously separated Tate from his senses, and his title. A misguided comeback effort less than three months later also ended disastrously, when Trevor Berbick nearly decapitated him in the ninth round of their meeting in Montreal.

This time, Tate seems to be taking a more traditional route, regaining his confidence against lesser foes in comfortable environs. In February, he comfortably outpointed little-known Harvey Steichen in 10 rounds at the Knoxville Coliseum. The win over Parker improved Tate’s record to 22-2 with 19 knockouts and marked his first win inside the distance since he devastated Kallie Knoetze in a title elimination bout in South Africa in June 1979.
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:55 AM   #103 (permalink)
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August 9, 1981

CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER

Dokes Demolishes Terrell

A sizzling left hand from unbeaten heavyweight Michael Dokes put Harry Terrell on the floor 18 seconds into their scheduled 10-round bout at Richfield Coliseum on Saturday night.

The rugged Cleveland native got up at the count of seven, but never really got back into fight. Though the younger and vastly more talented Dokes came within a punch or two of taking Terrell out in the first, he showed sporadic interest through the next several rounds, doing enough to win each clearly, but not showing much killer instinct, before turning it on again in the fourth.

Dokes battered Terrell with an array of power punches to the head and body delivered at a blistering pace through the fourth and fifth, with the older man looking eager to call it a night by the end of the latter round.

With less than a minute gone in the sixth, Dokes uncorked a devastating right behind a jarring left jab and Terrell (15-10, 7 KO) slumped to the canvas by sections. He made an effort to get up at five, but couldn’t even make it to his knees before being counted out at the 1:07 mark.

Dokes, who improved to 22-0-1 with 12 knockouts, led 49-45 on all three cards at the time.

The knockout, coming less than two months after Dokes stopped European champion John L. Gardner in six rounds, suggests the rising contender’s power may be catching up with his already-impressive hand speed, defense and footwork.

“Michael Dokes is the complete package, the future of the heavyweight division,” promoter Don King proclaimed after the fight. “He has the speed of Ali, the punch of Foreman and the ferocity of Frazier. The world saw again tonight what I have known for years – Michael Dokes is the future of the heavyweight division.”

While historically given to hyperbole, the promoter’s bombast was particularly interesting, since he has been the exclusive promoter of Larry Holmes since the World Boxing Council champion was a relatively unknown sparring partner for Muhammad Ali in the mid-1970s.

Holmes and King have been at odds lately, however, with the champion threatening to pull out of June’s title defense against Leon Spinks in Detroit unless paid a substantial portion of his purse up front. King reportedly attempted to have Holmes stripped of his WBC crown on the spot, before ABC television executives quashed the coup attempt. King has since denied any such effort, while Holmes has declined comment.

Holmes has said to be eyeing the winner of Saturday’s 10-round bout between unbeaten Renaldo Snipes and South African contender Gerrie Coetzee for his next title defense. That fight was scheduled as the second half of a heavyweight doubleheader kicked off by Dokes-Terrell on the Home Box Office pay-cable network, but had not been completed at press time.

With his arm around Dokes, King reiterated his assertion that Coetzee is ineligible to fight for the title, according to WBC policy.

“No fighter who carries the banner of South Africa, home of apartheid, deserves the opportunity to fight for the most prestigious championship in sports,” King said. “I’m sure my good friend Jose Sulaiman, esteemed and beloved president of the WBC, will agree with me.”
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Old 06-12-2009, 11:16 AM   #104 (permalink)
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August 9, 1981 (HBO between-fight interview)

(cue Larry Merchant at ringside with Larry Holmes)







LARRY MERCHANT: The heavyweight champion of the world needs no introductino, but we'll give him one anyway. Ladies and gentlemen -- Larry Holmes.


Larry, there has been a lot of talk about the implications of the fight between two top contenders – Renaldo Snipes and Gerrie Coetzee -- we’re about to watch. Will the winner, as reported, be your next opponent?






LARRY HOLMES: Snipes is as good a young fighter as there is out there. If he can beat a guy like Coetzee, he deserves the opportunity. If Coetzee wins, he gets the shot.

MERCHANT: There are other guys out there – Michael Dokes, Greg Page to name two – who are also unbeaten and have beaten fighters as good or better than has Snipes. They are also ranked higher by the sanctioning organizations. Why do you think he’s ahead of them in line for a title fight?

HOLMES: Coetzee is a more proven fighter than anybody Dokes or Page has fought. He’s been in two tough title fights, beat Leon Spinks, George Chaplin – if Snipes beats him, that means more to me than somebody beating up on a bunch of guys I’ve never heard of.

MERCHANT: Don King has gone on the record saying that he believes anyone who fights a South African fighter should be stripped of his title. Given his close relationship with World Boxing Council president Jose Sulaiman, are you at all concerned about losing your belt if you agree to fight Coetzee?

HOLMES: Let’s get something straight – Don King works for me, not the other way around. Or maybe I should say has worked for me in the past. I don’t know who is going to promote my next fight. It might be Don, or it might be Bob Arum, or it might be somebody else. Maybe I’ll promote it myself. How hard can it be? Call the networks, rent an arena, sell some tickets. Don’s made a lot of money off me – too much.

If he was such a great promoter, he’d have signed Cooney to fight me. He messed that up, and now Mike Weaver – who I knocked out – gets that fight. And all that money. And he didn’t have to deal with Don King to get it.

As far as the WBC goes, I’m not just the heavyweight champion of the WBC. I’m the heavyweight champion of the world. A bunch of letters don’t mean nothing to me.

MERCHANT: Are you saying you would be willing to give up your WBC belt if the circumstances dictated doing so?

HOLMES: Yes. King’s been holding that WBC crap over my head since I won the title, telling me I’d never have gotten my shot when I did if he hadn’t taken it away from Leon after he beat Ali.

MERCHANT: Did he say that when you were arguing in your locker room before the Spinks fight, after you initially refused to come out of your dressing room?

HOLMES: (laughs) Yeah, he tried pulling everything on me. But I told him I wasn’t making the walk until he came up with some cash. I’m tired of him ripping me off, and when Ali came in the dressing room during the undercard and told me Don still owes him more than a million for our fight, I said to myself, “Enough is enough.” It’s time for me to take control.

MERCHANT: Saoul Mamby, the WBC junior welterweight champion, was seen leaving the Federal Courthouse in Manhattan last month, but didn’t say why he was there. I’ve been told that you and your trainer have also been seen in that building this summer. What’s going on there?

HOLMES: I can’t say anything about that right now, Larry.

MERCHANT: There have been reports of a grand jury investigating the business practices of Don King and, possibly, the entire WBC. Have you testified before a grand jury on those matters.

HOLMES: Like I said, I’m not talking about anything but boxing right now. But let’s just say it is a very dirty sport. Somebody should have cleaned it up a long time ago.

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Old 06-12-2009, 04:46 PM   #105 (permalink)
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I sooooo like the direction that this seems to be going. It would be sweet to see the Hair Bear get what he has coming to him.... Now if only this would have happened in real life as it should have!
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Old 06-12-2009, 11:44 PM   #106 (permalink)
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August 9, 1981

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS


Call Him 'Mister:'
Snipes KOs Coetzee




Whether it was the report that a shot at Larry Holmes was in the offing, the chance to face a fighter portrayed – fairly or not – as an ambassador for apartheid, or the sell-out hometown crowd, the world saw a different Renaldo Snipes on Saturday.

The Yonkers-based heavyweight, known as much for a rather unexciting style as for an unbeaten record, turned destroyer, stopping two-time world title challenger Gerrie Coetzee in the third round.

Snipes’ aggressive style took everyone at the New Westchester Town Hall, particularly the heavy-handed – and heavy-footed – South African, by surprise.
After an even first round in which the fighters hugged more often than they punched and a second in which Snipes out-boxed his larger foe in characteristic style, things changed dramatically early in the third.

Snipes allowed himself to be backed into the ropes, but deftly reversed positions with Coetzee before launching a short, straight right to the chin that snapped the South African’s head back and stole his legs.

Rather than dancing away to safety after scoring, as had often been his wont through his first 21 pro bouts – all of them victories – Snipes moved in confidently, strafing the wounded Coetzee with an unerring string of jabs, crosses and hooks up top.

Coetzee managed only a couple of wild misses in response before Snipes followed a textbook left jab to the face with a right that landed high on his target’s temple. Coetzee wobbled, then crashed as the crowd crescendoed.

He was up at the count of eight and allowed to continue by referee Joe Cortez. It took just one more right hand down the pipe from Snipes, though, to convince Cortez that Coetzee had had enough. At 2:28 of the third round, Snipes had improved his record to 22-0 with 12 wins coming by way of knockout.

Coetzee (24-3, 15 KO) was helped to his corner and attended to by the ringside medical crew. After about five minutes, he was able to leave the ring and walk to his dressing room under his own power. He left the building about an hour later without commenting to reporters.

Snipes was mobbed by friends and family after the biggest win of his career. Injecting himself into the celebration at center ring was promoter Don King, who was seen on the fringes of Snipes’ entourage in the days leading up to the fight.

“We watched the films of his fights with Tate and Weaver, and I thought there was an opening to catch him with short rights inside,” Snipes said in the ring after the fight. “The first one I really landed was as good a punch as I’ve ever thrown, and I got in there and finished him. People said I’m just a boxer, but I can do it all.”

Home Box Office commentator Larry Merchant then asked Snipes about World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Larry Holmes’ pre-fight statement that he would next face the winner of Snipes and Coetzee.

“I heard other people say that this week, but the champ said it, too?” Snipes said. “Wow, that’s … “

Before he could finish, King forced his way between the winner and Merchant’s microphone.

“Renaldo Snipes is the next heavyweight champion of the world!” King exclaimed, wrapping his arm around the fighter. “He and Larry Holmes, two undefeated warriors, will put on the most pernicious pugilistic performance of modern times. Some people may be talking about Gerry Cooney and Mike Weaver, but the world will remember Larry Holmes and Renaldo Snipes.”

Before leaving the arena, Holmes offered his assessment of Snipes.

“He looked great,” Holmes said. “But it’s easy to look great against a big, dumb, slow robot. I don’t go down the first time I get hit.”

Told of King’s post-fight embracing of Snipes, Holmes -- who was widely criticized, most loudly by his longtime promoter, for saying he would fight Coetzee should he win on Saturday -- shook his head.

“That boy ought to watch who he hangs out with,” he said.
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Old 06-13-2009, 11:03 PM   #107 (permalink)
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August 21, 1981

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

Low Blows Keep Ratliff Perfect

Leroy Boone’s inability to keep his punches above Alfonso Ratliff’s beltline helped the lanky Chicago product remain unbeaten on Friday night at the International Amphitheatre.





Boone was docked a point in the first round for a low blow by referee Tony Perez, then fouled out with a blatant groin shot midway through the fourth, which left Ratliff – who improved to 12-0 with nine knockouts – writhing on the canvas for several minutes.

“He’s already tall, then he goes and yanks those trunks up to his ribcage,” Boone, who came in at a paunchy 231 pounds, complained afterwards. “I should have known better than to think I’d catch a break in this town, against that promoter. Thought I was fighting Robert DeNiro, with the acting job he was putting on.”

The 6-foot-4, 196-pound Ratliff was embraced in the ring after Perez’s decision by manager Carl King, whose father, Don promotes WBC heavyweight champion Larry Holmes, among other top fighters.

The elder King has taken particular interest in the rest of his stable lately, with Holmes making noise about fighting without his services.

Boone’s low blows were the night’s most effective punches. The fighters seldom threw more than one punch at a time, with Ratliff unable to land anything of much substance. Boone (13-8-1, five KO) led 29-28 on one card when he was disqualified, while the other two officials had it even at 28-28.

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Old 06-13-2009, 11:56 PM   #108 (permalink)
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August 21, 1981

THE STAR-LEDGER


Frank Flattens Feeble Foe


ELIZABETH, N.J. – Scott Frank improved to 16-0 on Friday night, but the quality of his opposition, or lack thereof, made it impossible to tell just how far he has come, or where he ranks in the heavyweight division.

Frank leveled the oft-kayoed Johnny Blaine three times in the second round of their scheduled 10-rounder, triggering an automatic stoppage under the rules of the New Jersey State Athletic Commission.

As in most of his previous 39 professional fights, of which he has won four, with three draws, Blaine offered little in the way of defense. To his credit, he remained on his feet throughout the first round, while allowing Frank unfettered access to both his head and body.

Frank started throwing overhand rights early in the second, and each one that connected put Blaine on the floor. The third and final flattening took place with 45 seconds left in the round, giving the Oakland, N.J. native his 13th pro knockout.

One something-of-a-celebrity at ringside was promoter Don King, who also attended Frank’s stoppage of Eddie Mallard in June. King did not promote Friday’s card at the Dunn Centre, but said he is considering signing Frank to a long-term contract.

“Gerry Cooney is not the only great hope of the metropolitan New York boxing scene,” King ranted, his arm around Frank. “This young man has what it takes to be the next Marciano, a real-life Rocky. All he needs is the opportunity.”

To date, Frank’s biggest win came in his fifth outing, when he won a 12-round decision over a 39-year-old Chuck Wepner for the New Jersey heavyweight title. That prestigious bauble was not at stake on Friday, since Blaine hails from Waterbury, Conn.
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Old 06-14-2009, 12:36 AM   #109 (permalink)
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August 21, 1981

LAS VEGAS SUN

Bazooka Gets Bombed

Wilfredo Gomez came into Friday night’s super-fight against WBC featherweight champion Salvador Sanchez on a streak of 32 fights that ended by way of knockout.


It did. Just not in the way anyone expected -- with the world's most feared pound-for-pound puncher on the floor, trying to figure out what hit him.


Sanchez floored Gomez less than a minute into the first round with a left hook to the head followed by another to the liver of the consensus choice as the world’s top 122-pounder.

Sanchez proved that 126 pounds is quite another matter, flooring Gomez again before the first round ended, battering him along the ropes at the end of the second, nearly forcing referee Carlos Padilla to signal an unbelievably early stoppage. Gomez survived, but Sanchez dominated through the next five rounds.

Gomez had his moments, rocking Sanchez several times with lefts to the body and a few hard rights to the head. Sanchez never lost control, however, and accelerated the beating as the fight wore on.

In the eighth, Gomez went down again after taking a vicious left hook to the face. He was up at two, but out on his feet as Sanchez opened up with both hands. When Gomez’s left eye began to balloon a minute into the round, Sanchez altered his tactics accordingly and started blasting away with straight rights. Two consecutive such shots sent Gomez crashing again.





The WBC junior featherweight king made it to his knees at the count of two, but came no closer to an upright position before being counted out. He tried to rise at eight, but his rubbery legs wouldn’t comply and he fell on his left side, where he heard Padilla toll 10.





An elated Sanchez improved to 41-1-1 with 32 knockouts, while Gomez fell to 32-1-1, 32 KO.
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Old 06-15-2009, 05:44 PM   #110 (permalink)
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August 22, 1981

Tonight, Greg Page tries to avenge the closest thing to a blot on his professional record (17-0, 16 knockouts) when he faces George Chaplin, over whom he was given a controversial majority decision win in his 10th pro fight, in April 1980.

The rematch has quite a buzz for a non-title fight, including advance stories in papers all over the country, such as the Ocala Star-Banner.

The Associated Press story linked above makes note of Page's conditioning issues, but was apparently written before he scaled a svelte 221 at yesterday's weigh-in ...
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Old 06-15-2009, 07:57 PM   #111 (permalink)
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I think you should give George a chance at the USBA title he was robbed of in AC.
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Old 06-15-2009, 08:10 PM   #112 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PWillisTheMan View Post
I think you should give George a chance at the USBA title he was robbed of in AC.
good catch -- I should have mentioned that. Page will be defending his USBA title in a scheduled 12-rounder against Chaplin, as in RL. I don't think I'd mentioned the USBA title previously, since Evangelista wouldn't qualify as a challenger and the USBA refused to sanction the Cummings bout as a title defense for reasons that have not been fully explained.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:13 AM   #113 (permalink)
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August 22, 1981

(cue Brent Musburger)




CBS Sports Saturday takes you now from the thrilling conclusion of the US Supercross at the Superdome in New Orleans to Atlantic City’s Boardwalk, for a heavyweight rematch. Most ringside observers thought George Chaplin outpointed then-prospect Greg Page when the two met 16 months ago in Page’s hometown. Today, Chaplin gets his second chance against a fighter who has blossomed into a top contender, scoring seven straight knockouts since their last meeting and turning his career over to one of the great trainers in ring history, Angelo Dundee.


For their second meeting, the scene shifts from Page's hometown of Louisville to Atlantic City, where another legendary cornerman, Gil Clancy, is at ringside to bring you 12 rounds of boxing action for the United States Boxing Association’s heavyweight title, along with his broadcast partner, Tim Ryan. Gil, can Chaplin repeat his performance from last time, and even beat a man many consider the top young heavyweight in the world?

(cut to Clancy at ringside)




Of course he can, Brent. He’s the kind of defensive-minded counterpuncher who can make anybody look bad. Page likes to let the other guy lead, too, and two counterpunchers can make for a real stinker of a fight. I thought Page did enough to win the first fight, and he’s in better shape since he started working with Angelo Dundee.

He’s been more aggressive at times in his two fights with Dundee in his corner, too. Chaplin’s had some tough fights since their first meeting, getting a draw against Jimmy Abbott and getting shutout by Gerrie Coetzee three months ago. I don’t think either of those guys is near Page’s level, but styles do make fights. And Chaplin’s style should make this another tough one for Page. We’ll be back after this word from our sponsor.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:27 AM   #114 (permalink)
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August 22, 1981 (Page-Chaplin II)

ROUND 1

The fighters meet at center ring and ... Page clinches. Referee Arthur Mercante separates them, Chaplin hooks to the ribs, then misses with a right cross up top and ... Page clinches.

They stand at center ring, apparently trying to out-feint each other. Finally, Page lands a right lead to the head of Chaplin. After missing with a left hook and a right, Chaplin lands a fairly effective jab, then whiffs with another right as Page drops his hands to his sides and pulls his head back at the last second.

The crowd serenades the fighters with a few whistles and more than a few boos after a slow first round in which neither fighter did much. Chaplin landed more punches, relatively speaking, but missed more, too.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:40 AM   #115 (permalink)
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ROUND 2

Page comes out on his toes and launches a left hook followed by a right cross, the second punch landing cleanly and opening a cut on the inner edge of Chaplin's left eyebrow.

As blood starts to run Chaplin's nose and into his mouth, the two trade light body punches until Page's left hook causes Chaplin to lurch to his right, clearly hurt.

After scoring to the body with both hands, Page lands consecutive right uppercuts, the second harder than the first. But just as he's starting to look seriously hurt, Chaplin blocks yet another uppercut and responds with a pair of hard jabs that move Page back a step. Chaplin comes off the ropes with a combination just before the bell. The crowd cheers at the close of what is clearly Page's round.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:52 AM   #116 (permalink)
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ROUND 3

Instead of following up on his strong second round, Page comes out dancing, then lays on the ropes and blocks a few punches before clinching. The only effective shots for the first two minutes are a left uppercut and a right cross from Chaplin, both of which land without much effect.

Page comes off the ropes behind a pawing jab, then follows up with a cracking right that sends sweat, and blood, flying. Chaplin's cut is open again, but Page shifts his attack to the body, landing several punches that score points without a great deal of impact.

A right uppercut from Page doesn't land square, but does appear to worsen Chaplin's cut, causing his corner to work intently on it during the break.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:00 AM   #117 (permalink)
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ROUND 4
His bleeding stopped, Chaplin lands a right lead before trading groin shots with Page, with each drawing a warning from Mercante.

As Chaplin becomes more aggressive, perhaps motivated by the taste of his own blood in the two previous rounds, Page begins displaying his defensive skills and countering sharply. He makes Chaplin miss with a hook and responds with one of his own that connects. After dodging a lead right, he lands a quick, but light, combination.

After blocking two body shots, Page cuts off the ring and unloads a hook to that strays south of Chaplin's belt line. Chaplin doubles over and Mercante quickly takes a point, motioning to the ringside officials.

Page briefly protests, but quickly begins taking his angst out on his opponent. He lands a right cross that buckles Chaplin's knees. But when he moves in to follow up, Chaplin scores with a desperation right that forces Page to clinch until the bell.

The round goes to Chaplin because of the foul. After four, ringside expert Rocco Del Sesto's unofficial scorecard reads three rounds for Page to one for Chaplin. But the first could easily be scored for Chaplin, which would make the fight even a third of the way through.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:15 AM   #118 (permalink)
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ROUND 5

The fighters spend the first 30 seconds circling and feinting, capped by Pae dropping his hands, then motioning Chaplin in. He complies and they suddenly engage in an extended toe-to-toe exchange at center ring, followed by a hard jab from Chaplin.

After another exchange, Chaplin connects with a nasty left hook that comes from down low up to Page's chin, then a right uppercut that lands squarely.

Chaplin comes out of the ensuing clinch with a right cross that gives birth to a mouse under Page's right eye.

After absorbing a right, Chaplin lands a couple of body shots and and uppercut to complete easily his best round of the fight.

Unofficially, ringside expert Rocco Del Sesto has it 3-2, Page, but it could easily go the other way as the fight approaches the halfway point.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:26 AM   #119 (permalink)
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ROUND 6

After some dancing by Page and a few pawing jabs from each fighter, Chaplin launches a murderous right that lands square, causing Page to stumble back towards a neutral corner and nearly go down, clearly hurt the worst he's been all night.

Page tries to fend Chaplin's charge off with a hook, but misses wildly and almost loses his footing in the process. He stumbles into Chaplin and the two grapple for several moments until Mercante breaks them, warning Chaplin to stop pulling down on the back of Page's neck.

They come together again, but both keep their hands moving instead of clinching, with Chaplin landing a short right uppercut.

Page, flat-footed now, bulls Chaplin into the journeyman's own corner, before stepping back and scoring with a three-punch salvo to the head.

Page moves inside and deftly evades Chaplin's attempted clinch, delivering a lightning-quick combo, a left hook and a right cross, neither of which travels more than a couple inches before landing squarely on either side of Chaplin's jaw.

The speed and force short-circuit his equilibrium, and CHAPLIN GOES DOWN!

Mercante pushes Page back towards a neutral corner and begins counting.

1 ...
2 ...
3 ...
4 ...
5 ... Chaplin begins trying to get up ...
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:28 AM   #120 (permalink)
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6 ... but his legs betray him and he lists to the right, landing on his side.
7 ...
8 ...
9 ...
10!

The winner by knockout at 1:58 of the sixth round, and still USBA heavyweight champion -- GREG PAGE!
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